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What's a Rogers R 360?

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#1
Gary

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http://cgi.ebay.com/... ... otohosting
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#2
Elvis

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Hey guys, look familiar?...

Posted Image

Well, its official - this guy is either a SCAM ARTIST, or he thinks he's got more than what he really has.

I bought that same model at a local music store in 1986 for $170.

The model is "Twister" and it was available in Blue or Red (looked more like pink) Ripple.
The R-360, for that vintage of drum, was made by Yamaha in the early 70's for Rogers. It was Rogers first attempt with using an imported drum as their "loss leader".
During those years, there were 3 models - Rock Solid, Double Soul and Twister.
Luan shells, knockoff hardware. They weren't bad, but any Rogers afficianado will generally turn their nose up at an R-360 (or its later big brother, the R-380).
Oddthing about that Twister kit. The bass, rack tom and snare were all 6-lug, but the floor tom was 8 lug. Never could figure that one out.
Also, floor tom legs require a drum key to tighten/loosen the lock screw.
Personally, I had a lot of fun with my little Twister kit. The rims on those drums were the same as Rogers used on their own kits, and the rim was quite thin - 1.0-1.2 mm. A lot of drummers actually preferred the thinner Rogers (and Ludwig, too) rims because they said it allowed the drum to "open up" more.
The problem was that, in the hands of an inexperienced drummer, they could get warped to point of being unusable pretty easily, if the kid was too heavy-handed.
That same inexperienced drummers has an advantage these days, since the thinnest rim he's likely to run across is 2.0mm, and thus will handle the "learning curve" more easily.
That was the biggesst problem with my pariticular kit. All the rims were so bent up, I could hardly tune the heads.

Anyway, its generic Rogers and is probably worth about 1/10 the price he's asking for it.

Still, nice drums. Would make a nice little, inexpensive bop kit for anyone wanting something small and easily portable.



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#3
torydrum

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but it's got a 14" FT. :?
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#4
trixonian

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Fake Rogers, but like many of the "firewood" import sets, they had cool finishes and are playable instruments, just not worth much on the market

Dan Coluccio answers this question often

viewtopic.php?f=2&t=43146&p=443295&hilit=r360#p443295

http://www.drumforum... ... hilit=r360

http://www.drumforum... ... 60#p334623

http://www.drumforum... ... 60#p378899
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#5
shilohjim

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The price is crazy, but those are good drums. The shells are Birch, not luan. The exact same shells as the Yamaha's of that period.
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#6
shilohjim

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Rogers had another R360 and R380 later, and those were the cheap luan drums. But I think the "real" Rogers were already gone by then.
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#7
Retro Rob

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found these posted yesterday. I always heard these weren't the quality of the 60s era Rogers
http://omaha.craigsl...1068526195.html
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#8
poot

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Retro Rob said:

found these posted yesterday. I always heard these weren't the quality of the 60s era Rogers
http://omaha.craigsl...1068526195.html


Yup, those are the 5-ply birch shells. Good-sounding drums but you've got to get the clip mounts off the ride toms. They really choke the resonance. That is the weak point of the early Yamaha/Rogers R-series kits.
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#9
jeannie

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I've been playing another drummer's 360 set like that with some different mount system at an open mic night and like 'em fine. Love the 20" bass. Of course, it's quiet enough that I play without my earplugs so everything sounds wonderful, including the B8 Pro cymbals.

I thought I saw a 360 set on ebay with a 16 inch floor tom. That is just wrong. :x
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#10
trixonian

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shilohjim said:

Rogers had another R360 and R380 later, and those were the cheap luan drums. But I think the "real" Rogers were already gone by then.


Thanks for pointing out the difference. I recall seeing these periodical discussions but it didn't stick with me that there are two series of R3XX. According to some of Dan's old posts the R 380's were made in the 80's subsequent to the Yamaha era. That might help me remember the distinction.

I've got a set of the Big R Rogers which were 8 or 9 ply maple shells with no re-rings and I thought the Big R's disappeared in the early 80's. Some of the early Big R sets had the older thin shells with grey paint inside, you can usually tell these sets apart by the knobby mounts and hexagonal floor tom legs as opposed to the memriloc floor tom legs which were oversize diameter hollow tubes.

Anyhow, I'll have to re-read my Rogers book about the late era history. I remember some big company (CBS?) bought them out and started making crappy drums, and the Big R's were the last high end drum that they made. It's interesting to hear the praises about the sound of the yamaha era drums.
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#11
DanC

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Hi guys...

CBS had resurrected the R360/380 entry-level line in 1980 or so. No relation to the R360 from Yammie in the late 60's (also a CBS invention), the 1980 stuff was not very good.
Then, Island Music started importing the Joe-Chen-made-in-Taiwan mainline Big R drums in the mid-80's after CBS licensed the name to them

Back in 1975, the original big R drums had the new Memriloc hardware (except for the floor tom legs) and the new badges, but they used the same shells as the last of the Swivo stuff: 5-ply with rings and the speckled paint inside. In 1979 the XP8's came along with the newer shell design. The hardware etc remained the same and these lasted until 1983 or so. Then CBS closed the op's and sold or leased the assets.

The employees of Fender got together and bought the company, that is one of the primary reasons why it survived and is around today.
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#12
trixonian

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So what are the distinguishing features between Yamaha 360's and the Island Music types later on?
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#13
DanC

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I've updated the timeline I posted above, to make it a little more accurate. :oops:


And, in answer to your question:

The 1960's R360 used a classic rail mount on the single-tom rig, had unique finishes typical of the period, oval badges.

The 1980's R360 were generic entry-level stuff, twin-tube tom mounts, plain finishes, rectangular badges.
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#14
Chris

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Seen the new Yamaha made Rogers sets lately ? Ughhhh!
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#15
trixonian

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I've updated the timeline I posted above, to make it a little more accurate. :oops:


And, in answer to your question:

The 1960's R360 used a classic rail mount on the single-tom rig, had unique finishes typical of the period, oval badges.

The 1980's R360 were generic entry-level stuff, twin-tube tom mounts, plain finishes, rectangular badges.


Thanks, Dan. I dig their swirl finishes from the 60's period.
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#16
Elvis

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funmachine said:

I've been playing another drummer's 360 set like that with some different mount system at an open mic night and like 'em fine. Love the 20" bass. Of course, it's quiet enough that I play without my earplugs so everything sounds wonderful, including the B8 Pro cymbals.

I thought I saw a 360 set on ebay with a 16 inch floor tom. That is just wrong. :x

Was there two toms on top of the bass drum that could only tilt and swivel on the post?
If so, that was the "Double Soul" kit.
They featured a clip-on, "concert tom" type of mount.


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#17
Elvis

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shilohjim said:

The shells are Birch, not luan. The exact same shells as the Yamaha's of that period.

You sure about that?
I've got the catalogue and it never says what the shells are made from.
I owned one of those Twister's (the little bop kit in the E-Bay ad). I always figured it was Luan and nobody's ever mentioned that they were anything different.

(and Dan Coluccio is on in 5...4....3...)


...speaking of which...

DAN,

its always been my understanding that the R-360's were ALWAYS a Budget/Student level series of drum.
Ok, so maybe the early ones were a little nicer than the later ones, but I thought the whole idea of them using the imported drum was to offer an inexpensive kit within the Roges line-up, while the factory concentrated on the "real" Rogers drums.



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#18
Elvis

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BTW, in case anyone's interested, here's the Twister page from the "catalogue" (told cha' the "Red Ripple" looked more like Pink)...
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#19
shilohjim

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Yeah, I'm positive that they are birch. And most likely painted either tan or silver on the inside.
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#20
DanC

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Elvis,

I don't know what kind of wood was used in those drums. Whatever was cheaper that month, I suppose... :wink:

And yes, they were always intended as entry-level stuff....
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