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Different treatment for live versus studio sound


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#1
bongomania

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Those of you that have recorded professionally, I imagine you have used plenty of gaff tape, towels, and whatever other treatments to get a certain sound for a certain track. When you have played the same track in concert, what have you done differently? Do you try to get close to the recorded sound, or do you not care so much about that? Do you use different treatments live than you did in studio?
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#2
BillyGoodness

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For me, the key in the studio is always show up with great sounding drums ready for the microphones. True edges, good heads, tuned well, with no rattles or squeaks - basically one of my 'studio kits' along with an assortment of snare drums and cymbals. From there I am as flexible as is needed to get the sound(s) that the artist and/or producer is after. Sometimes that involves dampening in a variety of ways and sometimes it means to play the drums wide open.

 

I've recorded in very large, hard-surfaced, super-live, rooms with my drums wide open when going for a big ambient rock sound. I've also done the opposite - with the drums really reigned in.

 

When playing live it's a bit different in that you can't stop and switch out lots of drums (snare drums might be the acceptation here), cymbals, tuning, and dampening from song to song. So, for me in a live setting I try to get my drums to sing out and sound musical within the context of the drum set as a whole. Any adjustments are normally done, in conjunction with the front-of-house engineer, during sound check, Since, the one thing that's almost always guaranteed to impact the sound of your drums from one gig to the next is the room.

 

I hope this helps to answer the question.

 

Billy G.


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#3
lossforgain

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Thanks for that Billy. I have sometimes marvelled at how different a song can sound live - probably the different recording methods, tuning, muffling, etc. that doesn't get taken into account in the live setting. 



#4
tradrad

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Those of you that have recorded professionally, I imagine you have used plenty of gaff tape, towels, and whatever other treatments to get a certain sound for a certain track. When you have played the same track in concert, what have you done differently? Do you try to get close to the recorded sound, or do you not care so much about that? Do you use different treatments live than you did in studio?

 

for me...and i might be completely nuts here...i try to get that 'quirky' thing i'm called for in sessions to translate live as often as i can. if i did a ringo thing with towels all over my drums, it's an easy fix to just throw them on at a show...in fact, i'll usually use the SAME towels as the session, cause i'm a nut case like that. knowing what tambourines work best on which drum, which beads/shakers bring out the right tone from a tom, that stuff can carry over from studio to stage. i take pretty meticulous notes on sessions...what cymbal i put on what snare to get THAT sound, etc...in anticipation of having to try to recreate the vibe live (usually months after the sessions!) i'll also take notes on what set/s i used and try to bring that set out on the road for shows...especially if it's a really oddball vintage thing cause that will invariably bring the artist and the rest of the band into a certain 'place'...right down to what rug i used :) for me, it's ALL about creating a vibe in the studio and on stage that makes the music go somewhere, hopefully the same place the artist wants it to go LOL

logistically, i almost always have 3, maybe 4, snares up and usable so finding 'that' sound isn't a huge deal...a basic midcrack all terrain, 1 or 2 small 8, 10, or 12x5 808 types that can cover tom or timbale duty...having a 6x16 or a fatboy 10x13 snare tuned low can double as a floor tom and, with a towel on there, it covers a massive motown/memphis backbeat with the snares on. finding tricks like that can make the transition from tape to hall a lot easier and a lot more fun.

jes sayin...


Edited by tradrad, 09 December 2016 - 11:53 PM.

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