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Clyde Stubblefield: I Do Not Appreciate Not Getting Paid

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#21
repete

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I recall a clinic that Jerome did about a basic 4/4 beat. At one tempo it was Kashmir by Led Zeppelin. At a faster tempo it was Billie Jean by Michael Jackson. Same beat.
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#22
& You Dont Stop

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So "Funky drummer" was released as a single in 1970 and the album "In the Jungle Groove" was released in 1986. I don't know which version caught the ear of would be samplers.

 

Here's my thing. Both the labels and James Brown likely had attorneys on retainer. Where were they when all this James Brown music was being sampled. Lets not forget this was 30 years ago.

 

Furthermore, while I wish Clyde was getting paid, there are probably millions of people half Clyde's age who know his name because of the sampling of one of the greatest moments in drumming history.


Edited by & You Dont Stop, 02 January 2017 - 04:34 AM.

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#23
biggator

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Can someone please clarify:

Back in in 88/89 a rapper Tone-Loc was sued( or threatened to sue) by Van Halen for sampling the Rif from " Jamie's Cryin " . How can this be contested and not a drum beat?

 

Once again... RHYTHM vs MELODY.

 

As for the Winstons 'amen brother' break.. that was sampled even more than funky drummer - there are sub-genres of electronic music that are completely based on that particular break.

 

As for 'sampling' equalling 'lack of talent'..  It certainly can be.. but that's the vast minority.  If you really think that you just lift a bit off a record and you're all done - you've clearly never tried it.  A sampler is a tool, nothing more.


Edited by biggator, 01 January 2017 - 08:56 PM.

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#24
Olderschool

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Want some real irony. Richard Spencer, the frontman and the copyright owner of The Winstons received a bunch of money a year or so ago from a Go Fund Me campaign to pay him for the sampled "Amen Break". I may be wrong but I don't believe Coleman's family, the drummer, never received a penny. That says an awful lot......


Edited by Olderschool, 02 January 2017 - 10:42 PM.

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#25
ian.thomas

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As for the Winstons 'amen brother' break.. that was sampled even more than funky drummer - there are sub-genres of electronic music that are completely based on that particular break.

 

I came to add a note about the amen break, but you beat me to it, so hear is a link to a cool video about it.


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#26
A J

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Boo Hoo...

 

He played a cool drum beat that thousands of other drummers can duplicate perfectly.  He got paid for what he did.  Both sides held up their sides of the bargain.  Now he wants money.  

 

Cry me a river.  


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#27
ian.thomas

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Boo Hoo...

 

He played a cool drum beat that thousands of other drummers can duplicate perfectly.  He got paid for what he did.  Both sides held up their sides of the bargain.  Now he wants money.  

 

Cry me a river.  

 

If it was just someone playing the same beat, even replicating it to sound the same, I see your point. But if a recording/sample of your playing was used, and to the great extent as discussed, wouldn't you want to be compensated? 

 

Do you feel the same if someone profits from plagiarism or copies of artwork?   

 

I'm not trying to start trouble, I just want to see your view better. :)


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#28
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In Clyde's case he should have been given some credit, and money, as a co-composer on "Funky Drummer" and quite a few others. I saw him perform this with James Brown many years ago and that groove was pretty much the essence of the song.  This whole sampling thing is garbage. Hip-Hop is talent-challenged bunch of noise any way. They had another lawsuit where a ©rapper used the bass line for "Under Pressure". He stated that "his" version was different. His producer had changed one note using the original recording and some processing and they claimed that it was different enough to not be infringing on the original copyright. Unfortunately the ©rapper won the case. The copyright laws need to be updated and strictly enforced. I mean, in modern "music" the singers don't sing live and all the "music" is being produced by stealing real music and digitizing it. 


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#29
jaymandude

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Boo Hoo...

 

He played a cool drum beat that thousands of other drummers can duplicate perfectly.  He got paid for what he did.  Both sides held up their sides of the bargain.  Now he wants money.  

 

Cry me a river.  

tough crowd around here. 


Edited by jaymandude, 04 January 2017 - 07:59 PM.

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#30
& You Dont Stop

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...  This whole sampling thing is garbage. Hip-Hop is talent-challenged bunch of noise any way...

While this has nothing to with Clyde being compensated for a few seconds of magical drumming....let me just say that NOTHING has made a bigger impact on pop culture in the past thirty years than hip-hop. Some of the most talented artist on earth work within (or at least in the margins of) the medium.


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#31
Olderschool

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...  This whole sampling thing is garbage. Hip-Hop is talent-challenged bunch of noise any way...

let me just say that NOTHING has made a bigger impact on pop culture in the past thirty years than hip-hop.

So true.......and so sad.
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#32
A J

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Boo Hoo...

 

He played a cool drum beat that thousands of other drummers can duplicate perfectly.  He got paid for what he did.  Both sides held up their sides of the bargain.  Now he wants money.  

 

Cry me a river.  

 

If it was just someone playing the same beat, even replicating it to sound the same, I see your point. But if a recording/sample of your playing was used, and to the great extent as discussed, wouldn't you want to be compensated? 

 

Do you feel the same if someone profits from plagiarism or copies of artwork?   

 

I'm not trying to start trouble, I just want to see your view better. :)

 

 

It was a lawful business transaction between two parties who were in complete agreement.  Both sides held up their sides of the bargain.  

 

Scott Fish calling this "heartbreaking" is just a bit over the top.  I can think of many things that are truly "heartbreaking".  A drummer not collecting studio royalties for decades is not one of them.  


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#33
Alan_

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He was a hired gun. He wouldn't be the party collecting royalties in the first place. They would go to James Brown's estate. 

 

I don't think that James Brown's bandmembers were collecting residuals like you would for, say, jingle work. From what I've read of JB's business practices, I doubt he was giving them points (jargon for future payments for playing on a recording), either. 

 

It's kind of a moot point. 

 

I'd love for Clyde to get a billion dollars for his contribution to popular music, but it ain't gonna happen. 


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