Jump to content



Photo

Some engraving practice

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
27 replies to this topic

#1
Eric Sooy

Eric Sooy

    Forum Guru

  • Members
  • 1,463 posts

After a bit of a hiatus, I'm back to it and working on some new old patterns. One is a classic scroll foo foo pattern, the other is a pattern found on Leedys. If you're at NAMM, stop by the BSP booth for an eyeful  :idea1:

 

 

Attached Files


  • 2



#2
JazzDrumGuy

JazzDrumGuy

    Advanced Forum Guru

  • Platinum
  • 1,966 posts
  • LocationMonterey Bay, CA

That is awesome!!!  Let me know if you will do a full shell......


  • 0

#3
poppies77

poppies77

    Forum Guru

  • Members
  • 1,290 posts
  • LocationLos Angeles
Looks amazing, well done!
  • 0

#4
singleflammedmill

singleflammedmill

    Advanced Member

  • Gold
  • PipPipPip
  • 207 posts
  • LocationCanada

That's really nice!


  • 0

#5
steambent

steambent

    Drum Czar

  • Double Platinum
  • 2,722 posts
  • LocationOhio
Cool! I have a Leedy snare with that pattern. Kind of a Dogwood petal pattern.
  • 0

#6
zenghost

zenghost

    Advanced Forum Guru

  • Members
  • 1,844 posts
  • LocationOhio
Truly impressive work there Eric - beautiful!!
  • 0

#7
Eric Sooy

Eric Sooy

    Forum Guru

  • Members
  • 1,463 posts

Thanks for the kind words everybody. 

 

 

That is awesome!!!  Let me know if you will do a full shell......

 

Sure - email me esooy@blackswamp.com and we can talk.


  • 0

#8
jmpd_utoronto

jmpd_utoronto

    Advanced Snr. Member

  • Platinum
  • 610 posts
  • LocationToronto, Ontario, Canada
Beauty.
  • 0

#9
repete

repete

    This one goes to eleven

  • Members
  • 3,686 posts
  • Locationsouth florida

what method do you use to engrave? is it machined or by hand? they look very nice!


  • 0

#10
Eric Sooy

Eric Sooy

    Forum Guru

  • Members
  • 1,463 posts

This is all done by hand with gravers. No lasers were injured.  :laughing6:


  • 0

#11
Eric Sooy

Eric Sooy

    Forum Guru

  • Members
  • 1,463 posts

FYI the Ludwig Joey Kramer snare drum is engraved by laser, which simply removes the finish. Well, not simply, the machine that does does those were designed by people smarter than all of us combined.

 

Graver style actually digs into the metal. This is more specifically called wriggle style, where you wriggle the tool back and forth. There's also push style (seen on a lot of Conn instruments), scratch, and air graver. Air Gravers are like tiny jack hammers. There's also western bright cut which is pretty amazing. A lot of firearm, knife, and jewelry engraving is done under a microscope. Random facts for your Friday.


Edited by Eric Sooy, 06 January 2017 - 09:13 AM.

  • 0

#12
jaymandude

jaymandude

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 392 posts
  • Locationouter limits

FYI the Ludwig Joey Kramer snare drum is engraved by laser, which simply removes the finish. Well, not simply, the machine that does does those were designed by people smarter than all of us combined.

 

Graver style actually digs into the metal. This is more specifically called wriggle style, where you wriggle the tool back and forth. There's also push style (seen on a lot of Conn instruments), scratch, and air graver. Air Gravers are like tiny jack hammers. There's also western bright cut which is pretty amazing. A lot of firearm, knife, and jewelry engraving is done under a microscope. Random facts for your Friday.

and who doesn't appreciate random facts ?


  • 0

#13
dtk

dtk

    Percussionist Maximus

  • Gold
  • 6,369 posts
  • LocationNeedham MA...

Eric...did you just pick this up and go with it?  Adult Ed classes?  Always an arty guy?  

 

dtk


  • 0

#14
Eric Sooy

Eric Sooy

    Forum Guru

  • Members
  • 1,463 posts

Eric...did you just pick this up and go with it?  Adult Ed classes?  Always an arty guy?  

 

dtk

 

There are two instrument engravers that had some videos online. One is a guy named Jason Dumar who does a lot of saxophones, and a person named Sherry Huntley who apprenticed under a Conn engraver and then worked for Conn Selmer. These vids merely provided a very basic basic BASIC understanding of the movements involved. There are a smattering of other engraving videos on Youtube also. I watched those to get a little clue about it. At trade shows I go to the brass and woodwind maker booths and look at anything that's engraved. 

Next you have to figure out the tools themselves. I spent a year on and off experimenting, buying gravers, ruining them, trying shapes, angles, and so forth before doing a real drum. I had scrap shells that I completely destroyed with experimentation. I mean I'm still figuring things out and experimenting and always will be forever.  Sir Master Kirchler kindly helped me on one recent question I had. And while I've never seen him engrave, of course I look closely at the things he does because he's da bomb. 

All along I just study and carefully look at all types of engraving, not just wriggle. In fact, as I've seen some vintage drum engravings it's obvious to me they put their worst engravers in the drum department - some of these old engravings are horrible. My dad is a jewelry smith going back 50+ years so he had some books I could snoop around in. Also, Mike Curotto's book, which I got for free at a DFO get together years ago has been an immensely great resource. THANKS MIKE!!

 

It's fun and very satisfying to do. You should try it!!! Honestly, you can get started with $20 in gravers and a piece of scrap metal. That's what I did.


  • 0

#15
JazzDrumGuy

JazzDrumGuy

    Advanced Forum Guru

  • Platinum
  • 1,966 posts
  • LocationMonterey Bay, CA
And there is an understated *serious* amount of creative talent, Eric....bravo!!!
  • 0

#16
CarolinaDrumworks

CarolinaDrumworks

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 241 posts

Also, you're a very patient person with a great attention span in order to do that detail and have it come out so beautifully.

 

But then, if you weren't you wouldn't be an instrument maker in the first place.  :)


  • 0

#17
JazzDrumGuy

JazzDrumGuy

    Advanced Forum Guru

  • Platinum
  • 1,966 posts
  • LocationMonterey Bay, CA

Eric, I checked out those vids - thanks for the references.  First of all, I figured you were using a Dremel type or other electrical tool "by hand."  The fact that it's a manual tool thingy was very surprising to me.  The technique was much more surprising, and the fact that he was doing it without a pattern - that's serious artistic ability which I sadly and definitely don't have!

 

I am going to give up on my pipe dream of doing this on my own........congrats again!


  • 0

#18
auto.pilot

auto.pilot

    Advanced Snr. Member

  • Members
  • 815 posts
  • LocationMichigan
Very impressive workmanship!
  • 0

#19
Eric Sooy

Eric Sooy

    Forum Guru

  • Members
  • 1,463 posts

Eric, I checked out those vids - thanks for the references.  First of all, I figured you were using a Dremel type or other electrical tool "by hand."  The fact that it's a manual tool thingy was very surprising to me.  The technique was much more surprising, and the fact that he was doing it without a pattern - that's serious artistic ability which I sadly and definitely don't have!

 

I am going to give up on my pipe dream of doing this on my own........congrats again!

 

Outlines are marked before cutting, but the shading and accents are not. 

 

I can't seem to get the embed to work, so here's the links to two videos. The first one is not a drum, but shows the wriggle method at the top of the vid. Lemme tell ya, straight lines are HARD to do! I did a drum with the thunderbird design which is all straight lines, and there is no place to hide.

 

https://youtu.be/OmplWNLas_w

 

Second one is saxophone shading work. Really nice shading going on in this vid.

 

https://youtu.be/jgMqqA9bge4


Edited by Eric Sooy, 07 January 2017 - 08:12 PM.

  • 0

#20
jmpd_utoronto

jmpd_utoronto

    Advanced Snr. Member

  • Platinum
  • 610 posts
  • LocationToronto, Ontario, Canada

 

Eric, I checked out those vids - thanks for the references.  First of all, I figured you were using a Dremel type or other electrical tool "by hand."  The fact that it's a manual tool thingy was very surprising to me.  The technique was much more surprising, and the fact that he was doing it without a pattern - that's serious artistic ability which I sadly and definitely don't have!

 

I am going to give up on my pipe dream of doing this on my own........congrats again!

 

Outlines are marked before cutting, but the shading and accents are not. 

 

I can't seem to get the embed to work, so here's the links to two videos. The first one is not a drum, but shows the wriggle method at the top of the vid. Lemme tell ya, straight lines are HARD to do! I did a drum with the thunderbird design which is all straight lines, and there is no place to hide.

 

https://youtu.be/OmplWNLas_w

 

Second one is saxophone shading work. Really nice shading going on in this vid.

 

https://youtu.be/jgMqqA9bge4

 

This is fascinating!  Super cool. 


  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users