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Luan Mahogany Snare Drums - Anyone have any feedback on these ?

- - - - - snare drums mahogany luan mahogany 6.5 x 14

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#1
DudemanSeattle

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Reaching out to the Drum Forum community - been researching possibly purchasing another snare with a focus on Mahogany. Seen a variety of articles specific to Luan Mahogany - some saying it is an inferior Mahogany and others suggesting it is an excellent direction. 

 

Welcome feedback if this is a solid direction to go in the $350-$450 price range for a 6.5  x 14?

 

Thank you!

 

Dudeman

 

 


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#2
shilohjim

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  The luan C&C Player Date snare is just a fantastic all around drum for most styles.


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#3
Drum Gear Review

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I briefly had one of the Yamaha Club Custom drums. I couldn't never get it right. It always sounded papery and thin - no meat to it. I know a lot of drummers who really love them though. I could have gotten a weird drum or I may have just never been able to figure it out. 

 

I did just get a chance to play a mahogany stave drum that was out of this world. Not sure about the origin or exact species of the wood, but it was a total knockout. 


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#4
Elvis

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Reaching out to the Drum Forum community - been researching possibly purchasing another snare with a focus on Mahogany. Seen a variety of articles specific to Luan Mahogany - some saying it is an inferior Mahogany and others suggesting it is an excellent direction. 
 
Welcome feedback if this is a solid direction to go in the $350-$450 price range for a 6.5  x 14?
 
Thank you!
 
Dudeman

Luan still goes by an ancient trade name of "Phillipine Mahogany".
It is a trade name ONLY. So much marketing, to be sure.
Luan is not related actual Mohogany in any sense.
If you're looking for a real Mahogany drum, Pearl still does their 4 ply reinforced Mahogany shell, formerly known as the MHX series shell.
This is REAL Mahogany ("Black African" variety) and you can hear the difference right off.
These days it falls under their Masterwoks series of custom made shells.
 
 
Elvis
P.S. Of course, if you're looking for something made from "Genuine Mahogany", remember, only this will do. ;)

Edited by Elvis, 05 January 2017 - 02:10 PM.

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#5
atomicmorganic

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I have a Pork Pie 13X7 Luan snare that I could pass on. I live near Seattle. PM me if you have interest. Real good price.


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#6
Joe A

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My first snare was and is an Apollo, red sparkle, with six lugs. Almost needless to say, it is luan. It does maybe two sounds well: a low-mid punch and cranked high, both with a rich, almost excessive warmth. It sounds great with brushes, and loves a little dampening. Not in the same category as actual mahogany at all.

One of these days I'll finally check to see if the edges are true enough, and give them a going-over if not.
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#7
DudemanSeattle

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Truly appreciate everyone's time and rapid feedback on the Luan Mahogany snare. C&C was 1 brand I am not too familiar with and welcome any additional comments if possible on this particular brand. Thanks again for everyone's follow up post.
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#8
RickP

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I briefly had one of the Yamaha Club Custom drums. I couldn't never get it right. It always sounded papery and thin - no meat to it. I know a lot of drummers who really love them though. I could have gotten a weird drum or I may have just never been able to figure it out. 

 

I did just get a chance to play a mahogany stave drum that was out of this world. Not sure about the origin or exact species of the wood, but it was a total knockout. 

 

The first generation Club Custom snares were Birch and Luan.

 

The last Generation Club Custom snares were made from Kapur - an Indonesian hardwood that is actually harder than Rock Maple on the Janka scale.

 

 

Luan as previously stated is not a true mahogany. Drum makers uses it because it is cheap and plentiful. It is not particularly very hard and is mainly used on lower priced kits. I would pass on a snare made from Luan.


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#9
drummerjohn333

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My first snare was and is an Apollo, red sparkle, with six lugs. Almost needless to say, it is luan. It does maybe two sounds well: a low-mid punch and cranked high, both with a rich, almost excessive warmth. It sounds great with brushes, and loves a little dampening. Not in the same category as actual mahogany at all.

One of these days I'll finally check to see if the edges are true enough, and give them a going-over if not.


I highly recommend doing this (truing up your edges). I had this done years ago on one of my first snares & it made a huge difference in how well I could tune it. It won't make it sound any different (unless you change the cut type/profile) it will just allow the drum to tune/perform like a higher-end drum.
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#10
drummerjohn333

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For this specie, I recommend the thicker shell (68 & later) snares made by Star. I once restored/flipped a grey-interior Majestic & it was one of the best woody sounding snares I have ever played.
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#11
tnsquint

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As mentioned, C&C does offer Luan as an option. Based on my experience with the company, my guess is they have figured out how to work Luan in a very positive manner as they do very fine work.

Most of us tend to think of cheap Asian imports in the '60s and '70s when Luan is mentioned. The wood tends to be fairly soft and splintery. That, coupled with the fact that those drums were generally built with vertical grain often led to very poor bearing edges. The snares are generally the worst of those kits. On the other hand, I have known some very established drummers that keep one in their arsenal as the softer Luan often makes for a snare drum that is simply not as loud. That can be a huge bonus in some situations.
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#12
Joe A

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Totally a great "quiet" drum, yes. I will check the edges on mine and finally add another strainer to make it worthy of going out, whenever I finally try to step out into the world of jazz. We've got some pretty echoey rooms around here.

Edited by Joe A, 05 January 2017 - 11:13 PM.

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#13
swarfrat

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Even balsa and cottonwood put rock maple to shame in compressive strength when comparing end grain to maple's perpendicular compressive strength. Vertical grain should be like getting a rolled stave drum. The edges may not be cut with care, but I would be surprised if they were actually damaged.
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#14
bongomania

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C&C was 1 brand I am not too familiar with and welcome any additional comments if possible on this particular brand. Thanks again for everyone's follow up post.


There are a LOT of threads and posts about C&C here, but unfortunately the search function here won't work for that 3-character name. So go to Google and enter something like "c&c drumforum" and some of those threads should come up.
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#15
Elvis

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The last Generation Club Custom snares were made from Kapur - an Indonesian hardwood that is actually harder than Rock Maple on the Janka scale.
Luan as previously stated is not a true mahogany. Drum makers uses it because it is cheap and plentiful. It is not particularly very hard and is mainly used on lower priced kits. I would pass on a snare made from Luan.

Balau also scores higher on the Janka Scale than Hard or Sugar Maple.
Balau is part of the species Shorea and falls into the group of woods that, collectively, are known as "Luan".
I notice with the older MIJ drums, the wood looks a little different and the sound is a bit different, compared to something that may have been carved in the last 20-30 years.
Could be those drums were more specific in the variations of Luan they used then (maybe a thin Balau inner ply?), as opposed to how they're made today.

...JMHO, but I wonder if C&C is doing something similar.



Elvis

Edited by Elvis, 07 January 2017 - 02:15 AM.

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#16
dwdave

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If you are looking for a low pitched snare sound and kinda limited to that, then go for it. If you want a all around snare, you may want something else.


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#17
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I briefly had one of the Yamaha Club Custom drums. I couldn't never get it right. It always sounded papery and thin - no meat to it. I know a lot of drummers who really love them though. I could have gotten a weird drum or I may have just never been able to figure it out. 

 

I did just get a chance to play a mahogany stave drum that was out of this world. Not sure about the origin or exact species of the wood, but it was a total knockout. 

 

 

The last Generation Club Custom snares were made from Kapur - an Indonesian hardwood that is actually harder than Rock Maple on the Janka scale.

 

I'd forgotten they were Kapur. Great call. Thank you!


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#18
drummerbill

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Reaching out to the Drum Forum community - been researching possibly purchasing another snare with a focus on Mahogany. Seen a variety of articles specific to Luan Mahogany - some saying it is an inferior Mahogany and others suggesting it is an excellent direction. 

 

Welcome feedback if this is a solid direction to go in the $350-$450 price range for a 6.5  x 14?

 

Thank you!

 

Dudeman

 Why not go to your local hock shop and buy one of those 60s-70s "hock shop find" $30 MIJ 6 lug specials ?   Comparing Luan to African mahogany is a big stretch sonically to my ears. Play a 60s Slingerland 6 lug mahogany or a Premier era true mahogany {I have 3} and you will hear a difference . IMHO

 Never played a C+ C Luan, and I respect what Bill and sons are doing if luan is becoming a "hip wood" again.. ;-)

 

 I have a malted anigre 13 x 7" that I built up from a steam bent single ply mystery shell from VC, that is a soft wood like luan. {Cigar box type wood}    It is sonically like described above, a preferred low tuning, soft tone, short sustain toned drum.  I have used it for two ballad tunes at a friends studio. "Fwap" ...  IMHO


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#19
swarfrat

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I'm actually looking for a 6 lug luan snare. There's someone on ebay asking $275 for a Stewart snare drum. Yeah. Jimmy Stewar'ts personal snare drum maybe. (There's also a nice looking red one for $65 which is about my limit for that one, but I'm done for this month.) 

 

One of the problems looking specifically for 6 lug MIJ luan drums is searching. Anyone billing it as MIJ is automatically asking too much. There's so many other brands of stencils that it's difficult to search (or even remember) them. Actually any useful information at all pretty much jacks up the price.


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#20
shilohjim

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 The C&C is very versatile. It has a very wide tuning range, and because of the full contact edges, no weirdo overtones. It's a great all purpose drum. But if you play in a loud band without being miked, it might not be your best choice.


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