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Beginning Guitar Next Week

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#1
& You Dont Stop

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My in laws bought my daughter a fender acoustic when she took guitar in high school. I assumed it to be the beginning of a love of performance like I have with drums. No.
Hate to see the guitar collect dust, so I'm going to put it to good use. Drums will always be my first love, but learning a melodic might open a door to composition and songwriting.
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#2
rhythmace

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My in laws bought my daughter a fender acoustic when she took guitar in high school. I assumed it to be the beginning of a love of performance like I have with drums. No.
Hate to see the guitar collect dust, so I'm going to put it to good use. Drums will always be my first love, but learning a melodic might open a door to composition and songwriting.

Get an inexpensive keyboard also. Learning chords and harmony on a keyboard, in the key of C, will make so much more sense and get you learning faster. Do both at the same time. IMO Ace


Edited by rhythmace, 16 February 2017 - 11:30 AM.

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#3
Lazmo

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Great...

I'd recommend a tuner app for your smart phone as you really want your guitar to be actually in tune. There are many free apps available, but I use Guitar Tuna.

I'd also recommend to get a setup done on the guitar... a good tech, can usually make it play much better than it will out of the box. This is particularly true for beginner players as you will be focussing initially on first position open chords and most out of the box guitars have the nuts slots cut way too high, making that first position much more difficult than it needs to be. I have been doing my own setups for years now, but I would say, get it done by the man and focus on learning to play.

A great web guitar lesson resource is ... justinguitar.com

Anyway, just try to play it every day... and try to enjoy the journey rather than focussing on being awesome.


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#4
& You Dont Stop

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Great advice, thanks
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#5
rhythmace

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Popular and jazz harmony use triads. Basically every other white key, in the Key of C, and starting on the C note on a keyboard. You can see and start to understand triads when looking at a keyboard because it is a simple left to right layout.  Since a guitar is tuned in 4ths and one interval is a 3rd, it's very slow going learning theory, or harmony on guitar alone. Also most guitar chords are inversions, or out of order triads. Had to say that. Heck, you can learn basic piano chords on the Internet. Ace


Edited by rhythmace, 16 February 2017 - 09:35 PM.

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#6
Lazmo

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If guitar is what you want to play, I would put most of your effort into the repetitive muscle memory training of your fingers… to train both your fingers and your ears, to sound the chords out perfectly … with no fret buzzes, or dead strings, just the beautiful sound of the full chord ringing out.

Initially start in the open first position and learn all the major and minor chords, and after learning each one, swapping between them over and over … so as to easily transition from one chord shape to another, without conscious effort. By that stage, you will be able to play many popular songs. Add in 7th, 9th and Augmented… and you’ve got a lot covered.

Then start on the barre chords… firstly in the E shape, then the A shape… including minors and 7ths … and most of rock is covered right there. The other awesome thing is that barre chords, open up the guitar neck to you… so not only will you be able to play chords up the neck, but if you look, you will see shapes in the chords and in those shapes there are patterns of notes that will fit the song … they’d be scales. Suddenly you’re playing Lead guitar.

And then after that there’s fingerstyle… and… and…
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#7
& You Dont Stop

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Even though I'm a rock drummer through and through, I actually have an interest in building a repertoire of classic country from the 70s/80s/90s on guitar. When the old timers call out a song name and say "key of C" or "D chord" I want to know what to do. 


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#8
tris66

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Even though I'm a rock drummer through and through, I actually have an interest in building a repertoire of classic country from the 70s/80s/90s on guitar. When the old timers call out a song name and say "key of C" or "D chord" I want to know what to do. 

 

Suggestions:

 

A tuner that clips on the headstock is a brilliant thing. Tuning apps are great, but being able to reach up and push a button is better IMHO. If you don't get your guitar set up as recommended above at least change the strings. Don't be afraid to go with lighter gauge strings if your hands prefer them. Your hands will build strength in time.

 

If you are going to a teacher get a good one. By that I mean someone who will help you get where you want to go. When I started I had a bunch of knuckleheads who wanted to teach me how to learn to read by playing Mary had a Little Lamb. My interest went to zero quickly. A good teacher will help you get going quickly and guide you by mixing the technical stuff and actually getting you making musical noises that are pleasing. A teacher needs to be able to take you from where you are to where you want to go.

 

Find a couple songs that you like which only have a few chords. Learn those chords and start to play along with the song. For what you are saying what you want to do I'd suggest something like Guitars Cadillacs by Dwight Yokum. Two chords A Maj and E Maj. And play those songs over and over and over.... Simply typing the name of a song plus 'chords' into a search engine will get you going.  Youtube is great for instructions on simple song BUT watch out for the knuckleheads who don't know sh*t and are just making videos to make videos.

 

If you want to be able to play a song in any key a good way to start is to get a simple understanding of chord progressions and how to transpose. The concept is pretty simple.... and maybe something to wait on until you get up and going.

 

Again: find some easy songs with only a few chords to play to. Then play them over and over and over.


Edited by tris66, 17 February 2017 - 11:10 AM.

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#9
& You Dont Stop

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I truly appreciate all this advice and support. Anxious to get started


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#10
rhythmace

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Here is a pointer that I learned later on. When you play rhythm guitar, in a band, you often do not play the bass strings. That is the realm of the bass player. You often play chords on the first four strings. That's from the bottom up. The thick E string and A string are bass strings. There are lots or exceptions, of course, but full 5 and 6 string barred chords are often for playing guitar alone. 6 string chords bring out the "little orchestra" aspect of the guitar. It's great fun. Orchestration, or arrangement, in a band is another thing. 


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#11
JazzDrumGuy

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I had a an acoustic as a kid. Back then with no WWW, and nobody in my family knew how to play, it just sat there. I taught myself on an electric at age 21. Good tips above. Learn openchords, bar chords and although some think it is cheating, learn tabs. Easy to find online. Id listen go my favorite rock songs and try to figure them out slowly but note for note. You learn songs pretty fast. Id go the clip on tuner way for less than $10, and yes setup the guitar and get new strings. My guitar playing is way more advanced than my drumming and it is so fun too. My 8 y.o. started playing recently in a group class and it is awesome to be able to play together.......
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#12
rhythmace

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Here is why I recommend messing with keyboard at the same time you learn guitar. Learn a C chord on guitar is a position of the fingers. On a keyboard you see the relationship of notes in a simple pattern. There is this concept called "the duality of music." Moving from one note to another is going both up and down at the same time. Going up a 3rd, is the same as going down a 6th. Going up a 5th is the same as going down a 4th. This also applies to chords as well as notes. One octave covers all the notes. You can figure that out finally messing with guitar, but it comes painfully slower. Maybe not so important if you weren't interested in composition. Still it helps with scales or modes, which are necessary to learn lead. Ace

P.S. BTW, the G chord on guitar is like shooting someone the finger. 


Edited by rhythmace, 19 February 2017 - 12:28 PM.

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#13
kplante

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As someone who just began learning guitar in November I definitely recommend trying to lay everyday if possible. Need to build up the callous on your fingers to play comfortable. I didn't touch my guitar for a week because of being beat up from shoveling snow and I'm having to build them up again. I'm working on open chords for now. Good luck with it!


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#14
bigbonzo

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So, how was your first lesson?


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#15
& You Dont Stop

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So, how was your first lesson?

Great. My teacher and I have a musical history. He and I were in the same band as recently as three years ago. he was pleased that I already knew basic chords. He spent the bulk of the lesson showing me the relationship between scales and chords. For homework he gave me a chord progression to accompany a major scale. He suggested recording the chords then playing along with the notes of the major scale forwards and back.


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#16
rhythmace

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So, how was your first lesson?

Great. My teacher and I have a musical history. He and I were in the same band as recently as three years ago. he was pleased that I already knew basic chords. He spent the bulk of the lesson showing me the relationship between scales and chords. For homework he gave me a chord progression to accompany a major scale. He suggested recording the chords then playing along with the notes of the major scale forwards and back.

 

That is great! Ace


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#17
Lazmo

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Brilliant... that's great news.
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#18
& You Dont Stop

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I mentioned that my guitar was originally bought for my daughter when she was a high school guitar student. The heart shaped sound hole "resonated" with her (I'm so witty). I'm not crazy about the look but this guitar was collecting dust in her bedroom. 

 

....and it doesn't sound too bad to my drummer ears

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Edited by & You Dont Stop, 27 February 2017 - 12:58 PM.

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#19
rhythmace

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If you take a tape measure and measure from the nut to the bridge, the 12th fret is exactly half of the distance. The 7th fret is exactly one third of the way. The 5th fret is exactly one fourth of the distance. Notice that you have dots at those frets. Since every note has an octave, up and down, notes and chords can be looked at in an ascending or descending order. If you learn full barred chords, don't try to hold all six strings down with your index finger. Arch the index finger to fret the 1, 2 and 6th strings only. Or the 1,2, 3 and 6 if playing a minor chord. The other 3 strings are already being fretted. May seem a bit advanced but will pay off quickly. IMO Ace

P.S. The F chord at the first fret ( playing only the first four strings) is the main chord position. It's a tricky chord, but you have to learn it. It is a simple major triad with octave. Move it up the neck and play the famous 1, 4 and 5 chords. Think about the math measurements, between the nut and bridge as you do that. Actually between the nut and the 12th fret. Cool stuff. Ace


Edited by rhythmace, 01 March 2017 - 07:35 AM.

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#20
& You Dont Stop

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This week my teacher said he can always tell when he's giving a lesson to a drummer because even when we misfret a chord, we're still keeping time and changing chords on time.


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