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Roland BT1 Bar

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#1
wflkurt

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Has anyone used one of these? I use two of the newer Simmons pads on my set triggering a Yamaha DTX II and one of the clamps for the Simmons pad has stripped out. The pads are kind of cheap and I was thinking of upgrading the one pad I use the most to something like this. Would I just be better off to look for a used roland mesh pad on the cheap?

 

http://www.musicians...-pad?src=3XBACR

 

 

 

 

 

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#2
cochlea

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I think they're a bit pricey for what they do. I looked into it at one time but found a deal where I was able to get a basic Roland PD-8 rubber pad for $30 (brand new). It accomplished what I wanted at a third of the price of the BT1. The BT1 has the advantage of being a bit smaller if available space within your kit is a bit tight. It can also be mounted to the rim of a Roland mesh pad or an acoustic drum if that's to your liking.


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#3
Tilter

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Kurt, the BT-1 is s great size that you can position just about anywhere on your kit, but I agree with cochlea on the price point being too high, especially since it's not velocity sensitive. 

 

If you don't mind something a little larger, the Pintech Dingbat would be another option for a stick style trigger and it's about half the price of the BT-1. Also not velocity sensitive but I have a feeling that's not a deal breaker for you.

 

http://www.musicians...bat-tubular-pad


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#4
blikum

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I've got a couple BT-1's that I use with my TD-30 kit. They are a little pricey, but everything Roland is. I love that they can be mounted just about anywhere on the kit. I use one on my snare for a side stick sound and another for a hand clap sound. 


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#5
latzanimal

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Have you tried to fix the Simmons pad?


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#6
latzanimal

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And I would find a used Dauz pad.....


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#7
red66charger

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I like the BT-1.  Yes, it's expensive but the design leaves lots of flexibility for placement and mounting.  Mesh pads can do the same thing but they take up more space.  On my gigging Roland kit I mount a BT-1 right above a PD-80 that has head and rim triggers.  In a relatively small space I have 3 triggers.  I think the thing I like about the BT-1 design most is that since it doesn't look or feel like a drum my brain recognizes it as a piece of percussion or FX trigger.  I'd use the BT-1 for hand claps, cowbell, triangle, crotales and even thunder.   :)

 

There may be more affordable options from other manufacturers, but after the pain of paying for it the BT-1 is pretty simple to mount and use.

 

https://youtu.be/YzHnU6cCUtU

 

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#8
Cauldronics

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I might try a BT-1 because the Roland RT dual zone trigger I have on my mesh-head snare won't trigger the head and rim separately, like it is meant to.  When I hit the rim, I get both the snare and edge sound every time, regardless of how carefully I set the threshold in the module.  

 

If I play the sounds on my DTX M12 pad, which has distinct top and bottom pads (one looks like a bar, actually), it works fine, but not when I use the RT dual zone trigger on a real snare dum with a mesh head.

 

Any know how I might make this work? 


Edited by Cauldronics, 25 April 2017 - 12:38 AM.

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#9
TDM

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Kurt, the BT-1 is s great size that you can position just about anywhere on your kit, but I agree with cochlea on the price point being too high, especially since it's not velocity sensitive. 

 

The BT-1 is fully velocity sensitive.  It's as sensitive as Roland mesh pads and outputs signals that facilitate the entire range of MIDI velocity values, from 0 to 127.  The BT-1 has two modes of operation:  Switch Mode and Sensor Mode.  This is not well documented in the BT-1 manual.  In fact, I don't think it is documented at all.

 

Confusing the matter even more is that changing modes isn't done on the BT-1, but rather on the module you have it plugged into.  This means if the module isn't aware of the BT-1 and doesn't have special modes to support it, you will not be able to change modes.  All is not lost though.  To get full velocity sensitivity from the BT-1, you can wire a special cable or use only the peizo side of the BT-1's stereo connection.  Even in Switch Mode, the BT-1 is still velocity sensitive, just to a lesser degree.

 

Here is how the two modes work:

 

Switch Mode

In Switch Mode, two triggering components of the BT-1 come into play:  switch and peizo.  The switch acts as a physical gate, stopping vibrations from other instruments from causing spurious triggering of the BT-1.  In the electronic drum world, this is known as cross-talk elimination.

 

All drum modules have cross-talk elimination in their trigger settings so why take such a sledge-hammer and non-standard approach (using a physical switch as a gate) in the BT-1?  The BT-1 is designed to be mounted on the rim of another pad, on the rim of an acoustic drum, on a cymbal stand, or on a drum rack.  When mounting to the rim of a pad or drum, every time you strike that instrument, the BT-1 will trigger as well.  Clearly, this is unacceptable.  Thus, Roland rightly created a mode so this doesn't happen.

 

In Switch Mode, as long as the switch inside the BT-1 never closes (meaning as long as you don't physically hit the BT-1), the BT-1 will never trigger.  When you hit the BT-1, it takes a certain amount of force to close the switch so that the peizo is read.  The result is you don't get quite a full range of velocity sensitivity.  Soft strokes do not trigger.  Only medium and harder strokes trigger.  This is intentional design to eliminate the massive cross-talk and spurious triggering that would otherwise occur when the BT-1 is mounted to the rim of another instrument.

 

Sensor Mode

In Sensor Mode, only one triggering component of the BT-1 comes into play:  the peizo.  The switch is removed from the equation.  Thus, the BT-1 becomes fully sensitive to soft, medium, and hard strokes, generating the entire range of signals necessary for full MIDI velocity sensitivity.  You use this mode when mounting the BT-1 on a cymbal stand or drum rack.

 

Roland modules TD-25, TD-30, and TD-50 fully support the BT-1 and allow changing modes within the module.  If you're using a different module than any of these, within your module, you may be able to choose which side of the BT-1's stereo connection you use for triggering.  Failing that, you must wire a custom cable to present the peizo side of the BT-1 as your module needs to see it.

 

Unless you use a module that fully supports the BT-1, you will not get the different modes, because the intelligence for the modes is in the module, not in the BT-1.  When using any other module with the BT-1, you will only get the Sensor Mode.

 

I have multiple BT-1 units and use them in Sensor Mode to achieve full velocity sensitivity.


Edited by TDM, 13 May 2017 - 07:56 PM.

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#10
wflkurt

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Thanks for the replies guys. I actually found a killer deal on two of these Roland bar pads and so far they are working out ok. I'm used to hitting a round pad as I have had the Simmons as part of my kit for the last 5 years. I also upgraded the brain to the Roland TM-2 and that seems to be OK so far. I like that I can create wave files and trigger any sound that I can come up with. 

 

A music store near me was basically blowing a bunch of stuff out to make room for new inventory and I found one of the se Roland pads for $70 new in the box and the other was pretty much new except it was out of the box and I paid $35. I will have to report back after I have done a few more gigs with this set up. I'm still figuring out the getting WAV files that work good. 

 

Thanks guys!


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