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Roland BT1 Bar

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#1
wflkurt

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Has anyone used one of these? I use two of the newer Simmons pads on my set triggering a Yamaha DTX II and one of the clamps for the Simmons pad has stripped out. The pads are kind of cheap and I was thinking of upgrading the one pad I use the most to something like this. Would I just be better off to look for a used roland mesh pad on the cheap?

 

http://www.musicians...-pad?src=3XBACR

 

 

 

 

 

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#2
cochlea

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I think they're a bit pricey for what they do. I looked into it at one time but found a deal where I was able to get a basic Roland PD-8 rubber pad for $30 (brand new). It accomplished what I wanted at a third of the price of the BT1. The BT1 has the advantage of being a bit smaller if available space within your kit is a bit tight. It can also be mounted to the rim of a Roland mesh pad or an acoustic drum if that's to your liking.


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#3
Tilter

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Kurt, the BT-1 is s great size that you can position just about anywhere on your kit, but I agree with cochlea on the price point being too high, especially since it's not velocity sensitive. 

 

If you don't mind something a little larger, the Pintech Dingbat would be another option for a stick style trigger and it's about half the price of the BT-1. Also not velocity sensitive but I have a feeling that's not a deal breaker for you.

 

http://www.musicians...bat-tubular-pad


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#4
blikum

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I've got a couple BT-1's that I use with my TD-30 kit. They are a little pricey, but everything Roland is. I love that they can be mounted just about anywhere on the kit. I use one on my snare for a side stick sound and another for a hand clap sound. 


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#5
latzanimal

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Have you tried to fix the Simmons pad?


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#6
latzanimal

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And I would find a used Dauz pad.....


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#7
red66charger

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I like the BT-1.  Yes, it's expensive but the design leaves lots of flexibility for placement and mounting.  Mesh pads can do the same thing but they take up more space.  On my gigging Roland kit I mount a BT-1 right above a PD-80 that has head and rim triggers.  In a relatively small space I have 3 triggers.  I think the thing I like about the BT-1 design most is that since it doesn't look or feel like a drum my brain recognizes it as a piece of percussion or FX trigger.  I'd use the BT-1 for hand claps, cowbell, triangle, crotales and even thunder.   :)

 

There may be more affordable options from other manufacturers, but after the pain of paying for it the BT-1 is pretty simple to mount and use.

 

https://youtu.be/YzHnU6cCUtU

 

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#8
Cauldronics

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I might try a BT-1 because the Roland RT dual zone trigger I have on my mesh-head snare won't trigger the head and rim separately, like it is meant to.  When I hit the rim, I get both the snare and edge sound every time, regardless of how carefully I set the threshold in the module.  

 

If I play the sounds on my DTX M12 pad, which has distinct top and bottom pads (one looks like a bar, actually), it works fine, but not when I use the RT dual zone trigger on a real snare dum with a mesh head.

 

Any know how I might make this work? 


Edited by Cauldronics, 25 April 2017 - 12:38 AM.

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