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How to mark/drill shell to put lugs on straight

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#1
TomN

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Hi everyone.

I've seen the adjustable jig on the Drum Foundry site for about $60 that would allow me to easily mark a shell to put the lugs on straight (square?). Is there a cheaper way to accomplish this? How do you guys do this?

Thanks a lot. Tom N
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#2
ducodon

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what i used to do was place a head and hoop in the drum to get my lug location from the holes in the hoop mark the shell with a pencal. then using a speed squer or a regular squer to mark my squer line on the shell. then maesure down from the eages to mark the lug location. then flip the drum and mark the bottom lug. this only works if you have a squer bering eadg if you eadg is off you lugs will be off the same amount you eadg is off.
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#3
TomN

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Thanks, Donny.

I was curious what to use after the shell is marked at the bottom for the lugs so that I put the lugs on straight and square. I was thinking of using an inexpensive T-square but I was wondering if there's one with a lip on it that would sit on top of the bearing edge, or some other tool/method. I guess I'll go and poke around at a wood worker's store.

How's your drum business going?

Edited by TomN, 30 December 2009 - 01:26 PM.

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#4
Stixnergard2

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Simple tools from Home Depot or Harbor Freight
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#5
Kevin_S

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A combination square is your best bet. You can also use it to set the lug hole distance from the bearing edge by locking the rule down and using it as a fixed guage..
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#6
TomN

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Many thanks. The light bulb is starting to go on.
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#7
jrfrond

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I use the Drum Layout Mat from Drum Foundry for marking-up the shell, which has blue painter's tape place in all the marking positions. Before the Layout Mat was available, I actually made something very similar.

For building Frondelli USA drums, I constructed acrylic drill templates that sit on the bearing edge. One for toms and kicks, another for snares. For most other jobs, I use a combination square that sits vertically on the worktable to mark the vertical lines. I also use a marking rule and a center-finding ruler. All marks are done with a fine black Sharpie, then punched with a fine all, and THEN a 1/16" pilot hole. Many times, the templates I made work just fine other drums as well.
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#8
nad_reese

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Thanks, Donny.

I was curious what to use after the shell is marked at the bottom for the lugs so that I put the lugs on straight and square. I was thinking of using an inexpensive T-square but I was wondering if there's one with a lip on it that would sit on top of the bearing edge, or some other tool/method. I guess I'll go and poke around at a wood worker's store.

How's your drum business going?



A drafting T-square has a lip . . . hangs over the edge of the drafting table . . . I use a head and hoop like punkdrummer to mark the shell and the T-square to run a line top to bottom . . . then I check and double check before I drill. . . I would like to have a mat though . . . NAD
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#9
TomN

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I use the Drum Layout Mat from Drum Foundry for marking-up the shell, which has blue painter's tape place in all the marking positions. Before the Layout Mat was available, I actually made something very similar.

For building Frondelli USA drums, I constructed acrylic drill templates that sit on the bearing edge. One for toms and kicks, another for snares. For most other jobs, I use a combination square that sits vertically on the worktable to mark the vertical lines. I also use a marking rule and a center-finding ruler. All marks are done with a fine black Sharpie, then punched with a fine all, and THEN a 1/16" pilot hole. Many times, the templates I made work just fine other drums as well.


Thanks, JR. I was wondering if anyone used a work table or sheet of glass below the shell to draw the vertical line with the square tool instead of using the top bearing edge. Those acrylic templates must make it much easier for your regular drum building.

A few years ago I made my own layout mat by using a protractor and a straight edge. It worked pretty well for a 14-inch drum but I need to get the Drum Foundry mat if do any new projects.

Thanks also for the tip about making 1/16 pilot holes. I always do that before I drill but wondered if you needed to do that when you use the Irwin bit. Good to know.

Thanks also Drums147.
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#10
Z Furman is back

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Hey Tom: What I did was to make a spacing guide for keeping hole distance correct by drilling an old beer bottle\can opener (I cut one side off) as a guide for lugs (two holes for bass & tom lugs, the third hole for snare lugs).

Drill one hole & mount a bolt through shell holding metal guide in place, then drill through other hole & your spacing will be fine, used this because I only have hand drills, if you have a drill press then you can drill an accurate hole. :occasion5:

Drum on,
Z

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#11
jrfrond

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Hey Tom: What I did was to make a spacing guide for keeping hole distance correct by drilling an old beer bottle\can opener (I cut one side off) as a guide for lugs (two holes for bass & tom lugs, the third hole for snare lugs).

Drill one hole & mount a bolt through shell holding metal guide in place, then drill through other hole & your spacing will be fine, used this because I only have hand drills, if you have a drill press then you can drill an accurate hole. :occasion5:

Drum on,
Z


A drill press is no guarantee of an accurate hole. It will just drill the hole accurately where you place your mark and punched (a corollary to "measure twice, cut once"). A hand drill, properly utilized, is just as accurate, and less of a pain to implement than a drill press. I almost always use hand drills.

Another thing is your choice of bits. Spiral bits in a hand drill tend to wander off-course, just by nature of their design. More accurate and cleaner holes can be obtained with flute-cutter bits like the UniBit system, which I use almost exclusively, except for my 1/16" pilot hole. UniBits will also not tend to blow-out the inner ply on a drum, because it doesn't want to grab and pull through the shell like a spiral bit can and does. Most of the necessity for a drill press is to control the inaccuracies of spiral cutters.

Edited by jrfrond, 31 December 2009 - 11:21 AM.

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#12
Z Furman is back

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Hey Tom: What I did was to make a spacing guide for keeping hole distance correct by drilling an old beer bottle\can opener (I cut one side off) as a guide for lugs (two holes for bass & tom lugs, the third hole for snare lugs).

Drill one hole & mount a bolt through shell holding metal guide in place, then drill through other hole & your spacing will be fine, used this because I only have hand drills, if you have a drill press then you can drill an accurate hole. :occasion5:

Drum on,
Z


A drill press is no guarantee of an accurate hole. It will just drill the hole accurately where you place your mark and punched (a corollary to "measure twice, cut once"). A hand drill, properly utilized, is just as accurate, and less of a pain to implement than a drill press. I almost always use hand drills.

Another thing is your choice of bits. Spiral bits in a hand drill tend to wander off-course, just by nature of their design. More accurate and cleaner holes can be obtained with flute-cutter bits like the UniBit system, which I use almost exclusively, except for my 1/16" pilot hole. UniBits will also not tend to blow-out the inner ply on a drum, because it doesn't want to grab and pull through the shell like a spiral bit can and does. Most of the necessity for a drill press is to control the inaccuracies of spiral cutters.


Thanks, for the information JR, I needed the guide when drilling my Tempus shells, only one shot at it. I used a glass hole bit to drill shells for mounting mic jacks for internal mic setup.

I tried S-Hoops on batter for Tempus fiberglass toms & a 1.8mm flange hoop for resonate side, seams to make the tone better to my ears. Do you still have your gold Tempus kit, saw a picture on your drum site before.

Drum on,
Z


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#13
nad_reese

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A drill press is no guarantee of an accurate hole. It will just drill the hole accurately where you place your mark and punched (a corollary to "measure twice, cut once"). A hand drill, properly utilized, is just as accurate, and less of a pain to implement than a drill press. I almost always use hand drills.

Another thing is your choice of bits. Spiral bits in a hand drill tend to wander off-course, just by nature of their design. More accurate and cleaner holes can be obtained with flute-cutter bits like the UniBit system, which I use almost exclusively, except for my 1/16" pilot hole. UniBits will also not tend to blow-out the inner ply on a drum, because it doesn't want to grab and pull through the shell like a spiral bit can and does. Most of the necessity for a drill press is to control the inaccuracies of spiral cutters.



UniBit . . . are you referring to step drill bits?

Like these: http://www.irwin.com...IrwinProd100146

Thanks . . . NAD

Edited by drums147, 31 December 2009 - 07:34 PM.

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#14
jrfrond

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A drill press is no guarantee of an accurate hole. It will just drill the hole accurately where you place your mark and punched (a corollary to "measure twice, cut once"). A hand drill, properly utilized, is just as accurate, and less of a pain to implement than a drill press. I almost always use hand drills.

Another thing is your choice of bits. Spiral bits in a hand drill tend to wander off-course, just by nature of their design. More accurate and cleaner holes can be obtained with flute-cutter bits like the UniBit system, which I use almost exclusively, except for my 1/16" pilot hole. UniBits will also not tend to blow-out the inner ply on a drum, because it doesn't want to grab and pull through the shell like a spiral bit can and does. Most of the necessity for a drill press is to control the inaccuracies of spiral cutters.



UniBit . . . are you referring to step drill bits?

Like these: http://www.irwin.com...IrwinProd100146

Thanks . . . NAD


That be them! :icon_smile:

BTW- if you are going to spend money on step-drill bits, buy ONLY UniBits. I purchased another brand once and it sucked.
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#15
PaiceFan

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Just curious. how do you keep your hole sizes consistant using a uni-bit with a hand drill? Do you have a stop collar? Or do you index it with a piece of tape? It seems like if you push a little harder on different holes they are going to be different diameters. Thanks
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#16
tmc333

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Great advice guys! I knew there was a reason I joined this site. THanks from a newbie bystander.
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#17
TomN

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(These old threads certainly pop back up, don't they.)

Edited by TomN, 29 January 2011 - 03:52 PM.

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#18
Titus Pullo

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Damn.
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#19
Eric Sooy

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TomN gets a DF layout mat on the house. Hopefully this won't get him banned from drumsmith. :lol:

Edited by Eric Sooy, 29 January 2011 - 05:51 PM.

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#20
TomN

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Unbelievably generous!

And here I was at the start of this thread trying to find a cheaper way to put lugs on straight rather than buying the special tool from Drum Foundy that would let me do this very easily. I sure don't deserve it.

Thanks a lot, Eric.

Tom N
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