Jump to content

Photo

Removing tape residue from lacquer finish?

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1
poot

poot

    Penncrest Endorser

  • Members
  • 5,634 posts
  • LocationOdebolt
I'm refurbing an '80s Tama Superstar snare shell which has a large swath of duct tape residue. The shell is wood and has a thick lacquer coating. Will Goof-off remove the residue without harming the finish? Normally I use acetone to remove tape, but I think that would harm the lacquer.

I can't believe that someone could allow a mess like that to occur on an otherwise beautiful finish. Of course it's fallen to me to clean it up. Posted Image
  • 0

#2
Sonorlite

Sonorlite

    Clown Eliminator

  • Members
  • 4,186 posts
  • LocationHard to Say
I haven't used Goof-off and don't know what is in it.

Naptha should remove the residue, with no harm, Poot.
  • 0

#3
Snowdog

Snowdog

    Advanced Snr. Member

  • Members
  • 631 posts

I'm refurbing an '80s Tama Superstar snare shell which has a large swath of duct tape residue. The shell is wood and has a thick lacquer coating. Will Goof-off remove the residue without harming the finish? Normally I use acetone to remove tape, but I think that would harm the lacquer.

I can't believe that someone could allow a mess like that to occur on an otherwise beautiful finish. Of course it's fallen to me to clean it up. Posted Image

Goof-Off, De-Solv-It, or any of the orange cleaners should make quick work of any tape residue with no harm to the finish.  Plus, those cleaners are easier (and less smelly) to work with, in my opinion.


Jeff


  • 0

#4
Coelacanth

Coelacanth

    A Piper at the Gates of Dawn

  • Members
  • 11,218 posts
  • LocationAlberta, Canada
I just had an idea, I might have to try this sometime.

Usually, if a tape residue is fresh, you can remove it with a similar tape by repeatedly pressing the sticky side of the tape onto the residue, over and over again, and it safely pulls off the glue as it sticks to the fresh tape.

When I removed the puffy sticker badges from my 3005's, a little bit of residue was left behind on the shells, but this was easily removed by using the sticky side of the removed badge as described above, with no chemicals needed.

My idea would be to warm the residue with a heat gun--NOT too much, just to soften it and make it tacky again--then repeatedly sticking duct tape on and off the residue to slowly pull it off. The worst-case scenario is it won't work and you'll be stuck (pun not intended) with removal-by-chemicals.

I've used this method to remove tape residue with good success many times, the only new thing I haven't tried is to warm up some old, dried up 'vintage gum' with a heat gun first--because old dried residue isn't sticky anymore.

Edited by Coelacanth, 07 January 2010 - 01:58 PM.

  • 0

#5
katfish

katfish

    Forum Guru

  • Members
  • 1,406 posts
Goo Gone works great too, and it won't hurt the finish.
  • 0

#6
poot

poot

    Penncrest Endorser

  • Members
  • 5,634 posts
  • LocationOdebolt

I just had an idea, I might have to try this sometime.

Usually, if a tape residue is fresh, you can remove it with a similar tape by repeatedly pressing the sticky side of the tape onto the residue, over and over again, and it safely pulls off the glue as it sticks to the fresh tape...

My idea would be to warm the residue with a heat gun--NOT too much, just to soften it and make it tacky again--then repeatedly sticking duct tape on and off the residue to slowly pull it off. The worst-case scenario is it won't work and you'll be stuck (pun not intended) with removal-by-chemicals.

I've used this method to remove tape residue with good success many times, the only new thing I haven't tried is to warm up some old, dried up 'vintage gum' with a heat gun first--because old dried residue isn't sticky anymore.


I'll try Mr. La Canth's method. This residue has been on the drum for a decade or more, and it's very stubborn. This will be a good test.

Another plus is that I can do this indoors. The wife gets on me if I use even the smallest bit of Goof-off indoors. She hates the smell of it, and I have to do it outdoors. This morning it was -12, and that sort of exposure can't be good for me - or the drum!
  • 0

#7
donthedrummer

donthedrummer

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 468 posts
  • LocationSaskatoon, Sask, Canada/Land Where a Man Cannot Leap to His Death
Hey poot,

Another safe bet would be the old standby - WD-40. It's not as fast as the citrus type cleaners but I find it works well if you soak a piece of cloth or paper towel with it and just lay it for an hour or so on the spot you'd like to clean. If you want a less aromatic solution, ordinary cooking oil is pretty effective too. Just let it sit for a while to do it's work. You might want to keep it off of any unfinished wood.

Don
  • 0

#8
JohnG

JohnG

    Advanced Forum Guru

  • Members
  • 1,806 posts
  • LocationEast Atlantic Beach, NY
I used barbque lighter fluid on a set of laquered shells and it worked great.
The residue was very old and on some spots I had to rest a soaked paper towel on the spot, but not for more than 10 mnutes or so.
  • 0

#9
jrfrond

jrfrond

    Percussionist Maximus

  • Members
  • 5,533 posts
  • LocationOceanside, New York
Those drums are finished in polyester lacquer, and acetone will work great and NOT harm the finish one bit.
  • 0

#10
MonkeyGrass

MonkeyGrass

    Keystone Addict

  • Members
  • 2,104 posts
  • LocationCharlotte, NC (when I'm home!)
+1 on the acetone. Always works great for me!
  • 0

#11
Coelacanth

Coelacanth

    A Piper at the Gates of Dawn

  • Members
  • 11,218 posts
  • LocationAlberta, Canada

Those drums are finished in polyester lacquer, and acetone will work great and NOT harm the finish one bit.

Are those the Tamas having the finish that wouldn't be harmed by machine-gun fire?
  • 0

#12
SteveB

SteveB

    Drummer Excelsior

  • Members
  • 7,595 posts
  • LocationSouth Hampton, NH

Those drums are finished in polyester lacquer, and acetone will work great and NOT harm the finish one bit.


That's what I was going to offer also. Acetone goes into the air in a split second, so unless you keep dipping the rag and holding it there there won't be enough time to do any harm.

Some of the other smooth and less toxic remedies may work also. Any jello like hand cleaner (which is basically Goo Gone) should also work but you may have to rub it lightly. Just don't use anything that feels grainy to the touch that would scratch the shell. Frankly gasoline, kerosene, turpentine or paint thinner would also work..have another (white) rag handy to blot the excess.
  • 0

#13
poot

poot

    Penncrest Endorser

  • Members
  • 5,634 posts
  • LocationOdebolt

Hey poot,

Another safe bet would be the old standby - WD-40. It's not as fast as the citrus type cleaners but I find it works well if you soak a piece of cloth or paper towel with it and just lay it for an hour or so on the spot you'd like to clean. If you want a less aromatic solution, ordinary cooking oil is pretty effective too. Just let it sit for a while to do it's work. You might want to keep it off of any unfinished wood.

Don


WD-40 did the trick. I first tried the hair dryer. 5 minutes on low, then 5 minutes on high, but I could not get the crud to loosen up. So I gave it a shot of WD-40, let it soak in a few minutes, and most of the crud came off with the first wipe. Had a few deep specks that required 10-15 minutes of elbow grease, but that's no slower than acetone, and I got to do the work indoors. Wife doesn't mind the smell of WD-40. Maybe I'll get her a can for Valentine's Day. Posted Image

Good to know that this finish could have handled acetone, lacquer thinner, or other solvents. But that's strictly outdoors work and in cold weather it takes them way to long to reach critical mass.

Count me converted to WD-40!

First the before pics:

Thanks, guys.
  • 0

#14
poot

poot

    Penncrest Endorser

  • Members
  • 5,634 posts
  • LocationOdebolt
And now the after pics:
  • 0

#15
stevesmithfan

stevesmithfan

    Forum Guru

  • Members
  • 1,151 posts
  • LocationRio De Janeiro, Brazil
Job well done Sir.
  • 0

#16
Coelacanth

Coelacanth

    A Piper at the Gates of Dawn

  • Members
  • 11,218 posts
  • LocationAlberta, Canada
Great! Added that tidbit to the ol' knowledgebase upstairs. :)
  • 0

#17
jazzdrummer

jazzdrummer

    Percussion Specialist

  • Members
  • 4,208 posts
  • LocationWest Virginia
Well I'm late to the party, but I was going to say WD-40. Works great!
  • 0

#18
mlayton

mlayton

    Team Dfo

  • Administrators
  • 26,082 posts
great post. thanks for all the info here!


mike

#19
poot

poot

    Penncrest Endorser

  • Members
  • 5,634 posts
  • LocationOdebolt
And here's the final result, reassembled and sounding great.
  • 0

#20
drumaniac

drumaniac

    Drummer Excelsior

  • Members
  • 8,431 posts
  • LocationCanada
Nice drum Tim, I have one in cherry wine red but I think I like the natural better.
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users