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Why Is A Gig Called A Gig?

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#1
shuffle

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We've talked about rack tom,ride toms,kits and kicks,how about the word,gig!
When and why is it used to dscribe a 'musical event at which you play your drums'?
My 63 yr. old brother can't seem to speak the venacular because he's as square as they come.
So he called a 'GIG',a musical event at which you play your drums!Posted Image
Is it a carney term?
Gigging people to come into an act by playing music first,just asking?
Anyone know?
Pat


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#2
4164SB

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http://en.wikipedia....cal_performance)
B)
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#3
Ludwig100%

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Because if we called it "Yack Tipping" nobody would understand. Ba Da Bump! Thank You, Thank You. You are a lovely crowd!

Edited by Ludwig100%, 06 January 2011 - 01:30 PM.

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#4
TomN

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Here's another:

http://www.word-dete...2009/02/22/gig/

Dear Word Detective: When most people are looking for work they are trying to “get hired,” but when a musician or band is looking for employment, they are trying to get a “gig.” What gives? Where did “gig” come from? — Ron J.

Dude, get with the program. Every job is a “gig” today. Calling your job a “gig” is a way of saying “I’m not really emotionally invested in my job, which I find boring and soulless, and I’m only doing it so I can act/write novels/play jazz saxophone on the weekends.” And it’s not just laconic “baristas” at Starbucks. I’ve heard corporate lawyers describe their positions as “gigs.” Personally, if I had a job that paid a half-million a year, I’d superglue myself to that “gig.”

Considering that it’s such a short little word, you certainly get your money’s worth with “gig.” Counting both noun and verb forms, the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) lists and defines thirteen separate “gigs.” Some of these “gigs” are clearly related, but the trick is figuring out exactly how. “Gig” is a tricky little word, and, as the OED notes, “the identity of the word in all senses is very doubtful.”

The first incarnation of “gig,” around 1225, was to mean “a flighty, giddy girl,” although this sense may well have been based on an earlier sense of “gig” meaning “something that spins or whirls” (as later found in “whirligig”). The Oxford English Dictionary suggests that “gig” may be onomatopoeic or “imitative” in origin, meaning that the word itself was meant to suggest something small that whirls. This sense of “gig” later came to also mean “an odd person, a fool” as well as “a joke” or “a state of boisterous merriment and fun” (”in high gig”).

Another sense of “gig” appeared in the 18th century meaning “light one-horse carriage,” perhaps based on the “bouncing, whirling” sense of the earlier “gig.” The same word was later applied to a small boat used to ferry crew to a larger ship, and a small spear used to catch fish was also called a “gig,” although the connection of this to other “gigs” is unclear. Is it just me, or is this a lot like wandering through a darkened room, stumbling over furniture?

In any case, we now arrive at 1926 and the first recorded appearance of “gig” in print in the “musical engagement” sense. The OED (and all other major dictionaries) label this usage as “origin unknown,” but there seem to be two theories. One traces this use to an earlier sense of “gig” meaning “a gambling bet” (possibly from the use of a spinning wheel in some original “gig” game), which then was generalized to mean “a business undertaking,” and then applied to a musical performance.

The other, which I tend to favor, ties “gig” in the musical engagement sense to the original “spinning” meaning of the word, perhaps influenced by the Old French “gigue,” meaning “dance,” which also gave us “jig.” Since playing at dances is how most musicians in history have made their livings, the use of “gig” to mean such a job makes perfect sense.
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#5
shuffle

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Right on,right on!
Well done TomN!

Pat
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#6
drumsforever

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I have to go with the adaptation from the Irish dance jig that makes the most sense. So it just naturally became known as a gig for people to dance the jig. :occasion5:
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#7
BKeeper

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Back when I was a kid, we would go "frog gigging".

You get a long pole (like a broom handle), and attach a "gig", which is a three pronged trident-like spear (see photo). After dark, you quietly paddle out onto a small lake or pond with a large flashlight and your gig. Shining the flashlight onto the surrounding banks and logs will reveal the frogs by their reflective eyes. Sneak up, spear the frog, and you got 'im! Fry the legs up the next day, and serve with slaw, sweet tea, and a mess of hushpuppies. Yee haw - good eatin'!

As a result of that southern experience, I always assumed that getting a "gig" was a way of saying that you landed or snagged or bagged a job or playing engagement.

Edited by BKeeper, 06 January 2011 - 04:13 PM.

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#8
5 Style

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'Coz it rhymes with "dig." As in "I gotta gig, ya dig!"

Edited by 5 Style, 06 January 2011 - 04:40 PM.

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#9
shuffle

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Back when I was a kid, we would go "frog gigging".

You get a long pole (like a broom handle), and attach a "gig", which is a three pronged trident-like spear (see photo). After dark, you quietly paddle out onto a small lake or pond with a large flashlight and your gig. Shining the flashlight onto the surrounding banks and logs will reveal the frogs by their reflective eyes. Sneak up, spear the frog, and you got 'im! Fry the legs up the next day, and serve with slaw, sweet tea, and a mess of hushpuppies. Yee haw - good eatin'!

As a result of that southern experience, I always assumed that getting a "gig" was a way of saying that you landed or snagged or bagged a job or playing engagement.

That's how I've always understood it as well!
You got a frog and a banjo player in the middle of the road.
Which one do you hit?
The banjo player because the frog might have a gig!!


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#10
69OysterBlue

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You got a frog and a banjo player in the middle of the road.
Which one do you hit?
The banjo player because the frog might have a gig!!



:lol:
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#11
marko52

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Back when I was a kid, we would go "frog gigging".

You get a long pole (like a broom handle), and attach a "gig", which is a three pronged trident-like spear (see photo). After dark, you quietly paddle out onto a small lake or pond with a large flashlight and your gig. Shining the flashlight onto the surrounding banks and logs will reveal the frogs by their reflective eyes. Sneak up, spear the frog, and you got 'im! Fry the legs up the next day, and serve with slaw, sweet tea, and a mess of hushpuppies. Yee haw - good eatin'!

As a result of that southern experience, I always assumed that getting a "gig" was a way of saying that you landed or snagged or bagged a job or playing engagement.


Where in hell did you find a picture of a 'gig'?....marko
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#12
BKeeper

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Back when I was a kid, we would go "frog gigging".

You get a long pole (like a broom handle), and attach a "gig", which is a three pronged trident-like spear (see photo). After dark, you quietly paddle out onto a small lake or pond with a large flashlight and your gig. Shining the flashlight onto the surrounding banks and logs will reveal the frogs by their reflective eyes. Sneak up, spear the frog, and you got 'im! Fry the legs up the next day, and serve with slaw, sweet tea, and a mess of hushpuppies. Yee haw - good eatin'!

As a result of that southern experience, I always assumed that getting a "gig" was a way of saying that you landed or snagged or bagged a job or playing engagement.


Where in hell did you find a picture of a 'gig'?....marko


Go to Google, and type in FROG GIG, then click on SEARCH. After the search, click on IMAGES in the upper left hand corner of your browser window. You will see photos of frog gigs, along with many photos of giggin' in action. Good times!

Edited by BKeeper, 07 January 2011 - 11:42 AM.

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