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OT: Well, I've got a rippled Retina

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#1
DanRH

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I noticed yesterday at work that in my right eve, when I read something, whatever I focused on was blurry. I got it checked out today and after getting a retina scan, I've have been diagnosed with having a rippled retina. Nothing short of surgery (which is very risky) can be done. My eyesight with glasses is 20/30 in that eye, so they think the surgery doesn't warrant the risk. That could change if my sight worsens. Also, it could correct itself (which is not common but can happen). So, short of having slightly blurred vision, I'm truckin' on.

Man, it sucks getting old!
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#2
cdlaine

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Dan ,

I too am getting old...but I make up for it by being slow.


p.s. rippled trumps detached....but then my glass is half full.


Peace, Chas

Edited by cdlaine, 28 June 2011 - 07:29 PM.

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#3
Thwack

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I had a vitreous detachment. Lots of floaters, sparks and blurry vision. It has slowly improved plus I've gotten accustomed to it.

Good luck.

"Getting old ain't for sissies"
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#4
Purdie Shuffle

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Keep a close watch on it Dan, by going to the ophthalmologist regularly. Especially if you notice any sudden changes in vision. My Bev is still recovering from surgery for a retina that became detached in two places. It's been almost three months since the surgery and her vision in that eye is still FUBAR. She's understandably upset about it. Don't ignore it or forget about it though. Partial vision beats no vision all day long. Look into natural vitamins or dietary supplements that are helpful to the condition.

Keeping an eye out for you... lol

John
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#5
Luddite

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I just had a chunk of iron dug out of my pupil, and another one just north of the iris. Very painful AND scary. It was a work related accident (I work in the finishing department of a foundry), and since it happened I've been wearing safety glasses and goggles, and stick a safety shield on for good measure when doing any grinding. I could have wound up with permanent damage in the right eye, so I'm going to be beyond careful from here on out. Vision is nothing to mess with.
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#6
Snaffoo

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Dan,
One of the guys I work with just had the repair operation done for the second time (one per eye), he's 56yo, a drag racer and welder. Both of these activities may have contributed but he's had 100% success.

His surgery was out patient and he missed about a week of work each time because they wanted him to take it easy, I'm sharing this because he has had 100% success in both eyes and I would think you'd like to hear something good about it at this point.

Scott
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#7
biggator

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Would have been cooler if it was a wine-red rippled retina..

Get well soon, man.. eye issues suck.
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#8
jbonzo1

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Dan,
John offered some great advice. Keep on top of it! I have diabetic retinopathy and went from 20/10 vision to 20/200 in my usable eye in about three years. I had the retina torn in my right eye during a vitrechtomy procedure, one of three I've had along with 18 laser procedures, which basically destroyed my night vision. As a result, I lost my career of 25 years as a photojournalist. You should have your eyes checked at least twice a year by an ophthalmologist. Don't mess around, stay on top of it and good luck.
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#9
CSR

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Dan, I was just diagnosed with exactly the same thing in the same eye. Vertical straight lines look wavy, everything is a bit blurry. My eye doc doesn't suggest surgery aty this point - says the improvement is only about 50% of original vision at best. I can cope with it usually.

I noticed at a rehearsal last night playing timpani, where I had a small score, I had trouble with a line that contained a number of C and B flat notes together...they all looked the same unless I closed my right eye...looked like a pirate....Arrrgh.

One of the joys of getting older, decrepit, more mature, I guess. Now my retinas match the rest of me....wrinkled!
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#10
stikman

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Definitely wanna keep an eye on that---LOL---20/30 is better vision than a LOT of people can get,Most states require at least 20/40 to drive.Ive worked in Eye Clinics for the last 24 years[Minus a couple of years on the road playing]I work for one of the Top Opthalmalogists in Houston now---Find the Best one in your area,and go regularly.
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#11
drumreaper

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I have something similar: Fuchs' Corneal Dystrophy, which means the back of my inner eye is developing holes in it, so I have patches of blurred vision, and floaters that I have mistaken for insects flying around my head or across the room. Not a fun thing, and no real cure other than replacement of the vitreous humour.

I still see well enough to drive, but for how much longer, no one seems to know. It affects everyone differently.

Good luck with your vision...one never realizes how precious it is until it starts slipping away! 8)
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#12
cdlaine

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Reaper...

Might want to review some of the latest results in stem cell

research...check out the majors...Jules Stein / Doheny eye....

Bascom, SUNY.... much corneal progress being made off shore

also...


Peace, Chas
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#13
drumreaper

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Thanks, Chas...living out in the middle of nowhere (Missouri), not exactly the cusp of cutting-edge technology! Much appreciated!
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#14
Drumstyx7a

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I've had a couple of instances where (because I'm sure from my not so well controlled Type 2 Diabetes) I had double vision. Wake up one morning and "Hey!, There's two women beside me!! When did I meet twins?" Then I realize what is really going on ... It goes away on it's own but it's usually a month or so and can be very much a pain in the butt. And I'm a visually oriented person and love photography (used to be a pro shooter) .... the last time I had it, I was in the middle of a month long drum line clinic and had to drive 100 miles round trip each day. Driving wasn't so bad, but reading the score and noticing detail took a hit.


Robb
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#15
Purdie Shuffle

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Robb - Not to go OT but this is important... I'm a diabetic too (type II well controlled,) you really need to see an ophthalmologist about the sudden changes in vision. It's directly related to the sugar levels in your blood. If you don't take care of it, it could potentially cost you your vision. One of the few things, other than a sudden change in sugar levels, that my doctor told me to contact him immediately about, is; - any sudden changes in my vision.

See an endocrinologist and get help bringing the diabetes under control and seek help immediately for the sudden change in vision. It's not a 'good' symptom, Robb. I like you man, please go see a doctor - like yesterday!

... and I hope I've spooked you into seeking some help!


John

Edited by Purdie Shuffle, 30 June 2011 - 03:15 AM.

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#16
Drumstyx7a

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John, you made me think of one of my late Dad's sayings. "You remind me of some of my wife's kinfolk!"

But not to worry, Those episodes 4 and 3 years ago, almost to the date and during the summer when I was driving an unairconditioned school bus in Texas heat for summer school. I would come home from work and would gulp down nearly a pitcher of iced tea ... sweetened with sugar. First time I suspected the tea thing and the second summer confirmed it along with some help from Kevin O'Connor and a couple of eye doctor friends locally.

Now I drink green tea with Splenda, Coke Zero and LOTS of water daily. I go through 2 cases of 35 bottles of water a week. Diet and exercise are also part of the program. Now all I get is just the age related floaters although I do need a new script for glasses or contacts.

When I said not so well controlled earlier I meant in regards to steady meds although I'm sure I'll have to get on to those at my next check up.

But hey, thanks for caring!!!


Robb
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#17
jbonzo1

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Robb,
John is right. Stay on top of it. My vision slowly went downhill over a three year period and ended my 25 year career as a newspaper shooter. Went from 20/10 to 20/200 and it's been three years since I drove and I won't ever again.
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#18
greggp

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The surgery isn't that bad, but the recovery is a b!tch. If you have to have a vitrectomy, you would have to lie in one position for several weeks while the gas bubble the doctor injected into your eye dissipates.
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