Jump to content




Photo

Question for Tommy Wells


  • Please log in to reply
35 replies to this topic

#1
troutstudio

troutstudio

    Idealist

  • Gold
  • 3,857 posts
  • LocationSouth of the border
If you were going to play an album of slightly rocky country music and needed hats you could play slightly open without getting in the way of the vocals, what would you use. Your normal hats? How about live? I know this is a mixing/eq thing too, but I'm wondering if you would take a different set from regular hats or something else. How about live? What cymbals do you use anyway? Thanks mate. HNY :occasion5:
  • 0



#2
troutstudio

troutstudio

    Idealist

  • Gold
  • 3,857 posts
  • LocationSouth of the border
Bump
  • 0

#3
Trey Gray

Trey Gray

    Pro

  • Members
  • 799 posts
  • LocationColumbia,TN.
Trout...put this in the general section that may help get his attnention......p.s. tommy's stuff always sound great and his advice is spot on happy new year
  • 0

#4
lossforgain

lossforgain

    Team DFO

  • Moderators
  • 12,199 posts
  • LocationLancaster, PA

Trout...put this in the general section that may help get his attnention......p.s. tommy's stuff always sound great and his advice is spot on happy new year


Done! Paging Mr. Wells...

#5
TommyWells

TommyWells

    Pro/Founder

  • Members
  • 7,805 posts
  • LocationNashville, Tn.
Happy New Year, guys! And thanks, Trey. Lunch is on me.

I use different hi hats for different things. I am a Paiste guy, so that is what I play. In the studio, when we're going to rock, which means I'll be laying into the hi hats and a lot of times they will be pretty open, I will play my old 15" 404 hi hats. They are about 35 years old and thin and washy. I have a pair of 14" signature dark crisp hi hats as well, that I play. It depends on the engineer. Engineers are not afraid of big washy hi hats in this era, like they used to be in the 80s and early 90s.

As far as cymbals go, I play 2 different sets of cymbals in the studio, depending on who I am working for They are based on 22" ride and a 20 and 19 medium crash or just crash in the case of the 2002s, which is what one set is. The others are signature crashes, with a Dark Energy light,dark ride.

In general, my cymbals are larger, thinner and lower pitched than they were previously, as that's what engineers have trended to. It is because of the mix and compression techniques, as they now mix for ear buds and car audio more than ever. The older style brighter and smaller cymbals can be painful in that situation. It has been a gradual evolution for me, just as I have slowly changed to larger and lower pitched drums as well. The 10" tom is long gone. I am mostly playing 24, 13, 16.

Live, could be many things, depending on the band and venue. I am down to just ride, 2 crashes and hi hats, these days. i also carry a 20" sizzle and a 20 novo china for special things.

Hope this helps.
  • 0

#6
cornelius

cornelius

    Advanced Snr. Member

  • Members
  • 951 posts
Thanks Tommy - great info!
  • 0

#7
troutstudio

troutstudio

    Idealist

  • Gold
  • 3,857 posts
  • LocationSouth of the border

Happy New Year, guys! And thanks, Trey. Lunch is on me.

I use different hi hats for different things. I am a Paiste guy, so that is what I play. In the studio, when we're going to rock, which means I'll be laying into the hi hats and a lot of times they will be pretty open, I will play my old 15" 404 hi hats. They are about 35 years old and thin and washy. I have a pair of 14" signature dark crisp hi hats as well, that I play. It depends on the engineer. Engineers are not afraid of big washy hi hats in this era, like they used to be in the 80s and early 90s.

As far as cymbals go, I play 2 different sets of cymbals in the studio, depending on who I am working for They are based on 22" ride and a 20 and 19 medium crash or just crash in the case of the 2002s, which is what one set is. The others are signature crashes, with a Dark Energy light,dark ride.

In general, my cymbals are larger, thinner and lower pitched than they were previously, as that's what engineers have trended to. It is because of the mix and compression techniques, as they now mix for ear buds and car audio more than ever. The older style brighter and smaller cymbals can be painful in that situation. It has been a gradual evolution for me, just as I have slowly changed to larger and lower pitched drums as well. The 10" tom is long gone. I am mostly playing 24, 13, 16.

Live, could be many things, depending on the band and venue. I am down to just ride, 2 crashes and hi hats, these days. i also carry a 20" sizzle and a 20 novo china for special things.

Hope this helps.


Your advice is always a help Tommy. Actually someone asked me this question and I thought of asking you and killing two birds with one stone; because you know the genre backwards and I couldn't recall we had heard about your cymbals, which I was interested in too. Amazing how the 505 and the 404 Paiste's - a sort of a budget pro line - have really become popular because of all the pro's who play them. I know the hats and rides are the ones people keep an eye out for. Good tip on the 15" too, because my guess is that with the softer metal of the 404's and the size, the lower tone would sit well in the mix. The 2002's well, they must be the Swiss Army knife of cymbals because the larger ones sound quite dark really and blend in very well.

I have one pair of 15" - I made a pair out of two orphans. The bottom hat was worn half away from being paired with a 14" but I found a partner and you have inspired me to give them a go. Louder than the 404's I'm sure but actually very controllable hi-hats:
Posted Image
Posted Image

Anyway, thanks for sharing your knowledge on this forum and thanks to the admins for helping me out HNY :occasion5:
  • 0

#8
TommyWells

TommyWells

    Pro/Founder

  • Members
  • 7,805 posts
  • LocationNashville, Tn.
Anytime. :icon_smile: And good luck with your hi hats. I understand that the most popular hi hats in the LA studios are the Paiste Signature dark/crisp 14s. Josh Freese plays them almost exclusively, even though he changes all of his other cymbals depending on the project. Keltner was that way too, with those hats, but I don't know if that's still true.

Be patient with me. Sometimes I'm working, and I don't look at the Forum until I get home. I don't take the computer into the studio....I will always answer, though. I still love this stuff.
  • 0

#9
troutstudio

troutstudio

    Idealist

  • Gold
  • 3,857 posts
  • LocationSouth of the border

Anytime. :icon_smile: And good luck with your hi hats. I understand that the most popular hi hats in the LA studios are the Paiste Signature dark/crisp 14s. Josh Freese plays them almost exclusively, even though he changes all of his other cymbals depending on the project. Keltner was that way too, with those hats, but I don't know if that's still true.

Be patient with me. Sometimes I'm working, and I don't look at the Forum until I get home. I don't take the computer into the studio....I will always answer, though. I still love this stuff.


Yes, those DC hats are excellent recorded. A friend has a set in his little studio - wonderful. And I was absolutely zen about waiting for your availability. I didn't want to fuss over it and the admins are great like that, keeping an eye on things and helping out. All good. :occasion5:
  • 0

#10
AtlantaDrumGuy

AtlantaDrumGuy

    Drum Czar

  • Members
  • 2,997 posts
  • LocationAtlanta, GA
Hmm. Wonder what the Zildjian equivalent to the Paiste Sig dark crisp hats would be???
  • 0

#11
RickP

RickP

    Dan RH Jr.

  • Platinum
  • 11,310 posts
  • LocationThe Great White North

Hmm. Wonder what the Zildjian equivalent to the Paiste Sig dark crisp hats would be???



I would think the K/Z combo would come closest to the Paiste Signature Dark Crisp.

Edited by RickP, 02 January 2013 - 01:58 PM.

  • 0

#12
TommyWells

TommyWells

    Pro/Founder

  • Members
  • 7,805 posts
  • LocationNashville, Tn.
The K/Z's are a little brighter and pingier, to me. The Dark Crisp has a nice stick sound, but a pretty low and smooth wash sound, where the K/Z is sharper sounding. I think the Z bottom cymbal really makes them sound harder. I think the right pair of K's would be closer, with a heavier bottom than top. Or maybe a pair of the Gadd session hats, but play the lighter cymbal on top, unlike Steve, who has the heavy cymbal on top with those. As` with all Zildjian cymbals, you have to hear them in person, as each cymbal is is unique.
  • 0

#13
AtlantaDrumGuy

AtlantaDrumGuy

    Drum Czar

  • Members
  • 2,997 posts
  • LocationAtlanta, GA

The K/Z's are a little brighter and pingier, to me. The Dark Crisp has a nice stick sound, but a pretty low and smooth wash sound, where the K/Z is sharper sounding. I think the Z bottom cymbal really makes them sound harder. I think the right pair of K's would be closer, with a heavier bottom than top. Or maybe a pair of the Gadd session hats, but play the lighter cymbal on top, unlike Steve, who has the heavy cymbal on top with those. As` with all Zildjian cymbals, you have to hear them in person, as each cymbal is is unique.


Good point...best to hear them first. I've been playing larger hats, but still work the 14s at times. I ended up finding a Zildjian combo that has kind of a similar vibe....so it's a keeper! But I've come to the conclusion that I just like different sizes for different things.

Edited by AtlantaDrumGuy, 03 January 2013 - 10:03 AM.

  • 0

#14
Bongo Congo

Bongo Congo

  • Members
  • 6,562 posts
Paiste 505 guys: you might wanna take a glance at this eBay auction:

http://www.ebay.com/...=item2a27adc5fc

Just happened to notice these, and then the mention here. Not my auction.
  • 0

#15
TommyWells

TommyWells

    Pro/Founder

  • Members
  • 7,805 posts
  • LocationNashville, Tn.
Just FYI: Those are pretty bright and pingy. Much more so than Dark/Crisp. The 404 15s are the ones farthest in the direction I am talking about. I play the 505 15s in a live situation mostly. Sometimes studio, but when a loud chick and stick attack is what we're going for. The 15s seem harder to find, though.

These are nice http://www.ebay.com/...=item1c2ec637e9
  • 0

#16
AtlantaDrumGuy

AtlantaDrumGuy

    Drum Czar

  • Members
  • 2,997 posts
  • LocationAtlanta, GA
For backbeat music, hi hats (as far as cymbals go) are perhaps the most important thing to select! Obviously for jazz it would be the ride cymbal. This is a reason I like having multiple hi hat options.
  • 0

#17
Bongo Congo

Bongo Congo

  • Members
  • 6,562 posts

Just FYI: Those are pretty bright and pingy. Much more so than Dark/Crisp. The 404 15s are the ones farthest in the direction I am talking about. I play the 505 15s in a live situation mostly. Sometimes studio, but when a loud chick and stick attack is what we're going for. The 15s seem harder to find, though.

These are nice http://www.ebay.com/...=item1c2ec637e9

Aha. Thank You!
  • 0

#18
TommyWells

TommyWells

    Pro/Founder

  • Members
  • 7,805 posts
  • LocationNashville, Tn.
Anytime, Bongo.... :icon_smile:

Edited by TommyWells, 03 January 2013 - 06:14 PM.

  • 0

#19
tbart16

tbart16

    Advanced Snr. Member

  • Members
  • 958 posts
  • LocationAndreas,Pa
Great info,it kind of surprised me that you are rockin a 24" kick :-D thanks for hanging out and offering your advice
  • 0

#20
ruanddu

ruanddu

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 463 posts
Tommy, is there a difference between the "Reflector" hats vs. non "Reflector" in sound with the dark crisps?
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users