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#1
dblKick

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I just bought a Gretsch Renown Maple kit & have several vintage drums in my "office" that is only heated when needed. That being said, it gets below zero occasionally. Will this damage my drums?

Thx. Dave
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#2
dimag333

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I personally wouldnt sweat it too much
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#3
noahJT

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Usually I say its no problem unless a wrap is involved, but that may be a bit extreme. There is water content in wood. And freezing it then unfreezing it and back again can't be good for plies. I think if they hibernate it's probably not horrible, but if temps are constantly straddling above and below freezing it may be bad. I wouldn't risk it if I didn't have to.
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#4
Cauldronics

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I'd put some kind of heavy sheet over the kit to keep the moisture from fluctuating too much. I don't know what kind of sheet, but maybe someone else will.
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#5
gryphon

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My suggestion would be to protect them from condensation when warm weather follows a cold spell. I assume you have them in cases. If they were mine I would just get the heaviest garbage bags I could find and put the drum in the bag and then into the case. The case will provide a bit of insulation to slow down temperature changes and the garbage bag will provide a moisture barrier. Be sure to seal the bag. Do the bagging in the house and then take them out to seal the driest air possible in the bag.

jim

Edited by gryphon, 03 January 2013 - 08:53 PM.

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#6
A J

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All my drums are stored in soft cases in an unheated barn in Michigan. Years ago, when I moved from Iowa to Michigan all my drums were in cases, in the back of an open pickup in subzero temps flying down the highway for 15 hours. No damage, no problem. Your drums will be fine. Humidity is a bigger issue.
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#7
drumsforever

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I just bought a Gretsch Renown Maple kit & have several vintage drums in my "office" that is only heated when needed. That being said, it gets below zero occasionally. Will this damage my drums?

Thx. Dave


If they are not in bags or cases then wrap them in blankets and keep the area as dry as possible.
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#8
BennyK

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That's not too extreme. Damage usually happens when an instrument is exposed to warm temperature while it is still cold.

Up here, it can get down to about -30 Celsius . When I drove across Canada, the guitar man brought in a beautiful Gibson Hummingbird from the car to the Motel room. Within minutes of opening the case, the varnish cracked into a web. Mind you this was February in Sault St. Marie, Northern Ontario, where thermometers explode.

Edited by BennyK, 04 January 2013 - 11:41 AM.

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#9
xsabers

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DW has this on their website FAQs section:

Proper Storage of your DW Drums:
It is very important to protect your drums from damage and temperature extremes. It is recommended that cases or soft bags be used when transporting and storing drums. If your drums are set up for an extended period of time, keep them covered. Keep drums away from and out of damp or cold areas.

How to control for potential damage from extreme temperatures:
Extreme temperature shifts within a short period of time do pose a potential hazard to drum shells and their finishes. As humidity and temperature change, the moisture content within the cells of the wood is affected. This can make the shells expand or contract, warp or even crack. A general consensus among drum manufacturers has been that drums are safe and comfortable when stored in an environment in which you are comfortable in.
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#10
SteveB

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All I can offer is that I had kits sit in and travel in a box truck for more than a decade. If I were home the drums never came in the house ever, except maybe for a quick repair. I always reheaded on the job. Realistically speaking that's roughly 20 below to maybe 120 degrees so there was quite a fluctuation. I never had an issue in all those years other than basic upkeep.

What was an issue was moving equipment into a building in the dead of winter, and of course the hardware was dripping wet when the cases were opened. I just cleaned them once in while and went after the rust, mostly near the keys on the hoops; my own sweat probably did more damage than anything, looking back. Also, for a road kit I wasn't nearly as fussy as most of you would be; these weren't set up in my living room. I drew the line at looking good on stage at twenty paces, under lights.

As others have said acclimation is probably the biggest issue with any instrument, or metal tool even. I don't think I'd worry too much about the shells themselves. They'll do whatever they do and it would be very hard to control the environment anyway.
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#11
dblKick

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Thanks for the replies, i don't have them in cases, I have them set up for when I'm in my office & I need a little stress relief.
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#12
tamadrm

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If you storing them in cases,make sure you use some silica gel packs.The'll absorb moisture that would ordinarily rust your hardware,and warp your shells.

Steve B
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#13
MrDrums2112

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Wow - it's 50 degrees in my basement now, and I am worried about that. At least it's dry with the colder temps. It gets to about 65-70 in the summer, and I keep the dehumidifier running then. I was worried about the 50 degree temp.
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#14
Markkuliini

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If they are wrapped, I think it's all about the material of the wrap itself. I've seen both horror stories and surviving. :shock:

-A friend of mine had ALL BUT ONE drums crack their wrap during one night in only -5 Celsius (23 Farenheit). The wraps in all the toms and the bass drum cracked, but snare survived. They were Tama Starclassics from late 90's in white finish. Kind of pearly white, if I remember correctly.

-Another friend had his 70's Gretsch 3 piece kit's wraps crack during one transport when he was touring in Lapland and they were hauling gear in unheated trailer. He said that the temperatures were extreme, like -30 Celsius (-22 F), which are not that uncommon here. The finish was midnight blue pearl.

-I've been transporting AND keeping my Dw drums (black ice finish) for 4 winters (and years) in a row at the back of a tour bus, and the weather has been -35 C (-31 F) at the coldest, and the winters are about 4 months long. So they are basically at outside temperature all the time but the gig days on the weekends. I was nervous for the first winter, but the wraps and shells are still good as new. Maybe you need to have the word 'ice' in the name to keep them safe? :occasion5:

Someone with more knowledge might be able to tell why this happens with certain wraps and not with others. I suspect that the wrap materials have severe differences in the way they react to the cold.

Edited by Markkuliini, 04 January 2013 - 06:53 PM.

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