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JCKOriollo

JCKOriollo

Member Since 05 Aug 2011
Offline Last Active Today, 03:59 PM

The Oriollo Bakar 40 Review - 14X4 Seamless Copper

27 March 2018 - 12:54 PM

The back-story: If there was a meeting for Oriollo addicts anonymous I would probably have to attend. My collection thus far includes 9 snares and 3 kits. I use all of this frequently, and really can’t say enough good things about the sonic palette the different materials provide me. Occasionally, I will get a little extra cash, and will approach Vukan about doing something interesting or unique…kind of a non-stock creation. I find the process somewhat experimental, but also a lot of fun. It’s very cool to have a company that will accommodate my requests. I have done this in the past with a 16X5 aluminum, and more recently a 15X6.5 spun steel. I have been kind of jonesing lately for a shallower snare…and one with somewhat of a vintage vibe…so I tossed the idea of this 14X4 Copper snare to him..and mentioned I wanted him to try some custom laser engraving…and he was all for it…and so this snare was born. 

 

Arrival/Unboxing: This snare went through the same process as always…shipping from Serbia…taking roughly about 10 days to get to me…and being packed really well. No big surprises there. For this snare, I purchased snare w/strainer attached and provided my own lugs…which were smaller tube lugs. I did this because I felt it fit the vibe better.

 

How it's made: This snare is a Bakar and is 14X4. The layout of the snare is the Oriphonic, meaning it has a rounded top edge, and a slight inner 45 on the bottom. This snare is a brushed finish without a lacquer, so it will patina over time. For this snare, I wanted to do something unique, in the style of the vintage engraved snares…so I created a floral design in illustrator based off some designs I really liked from the 20s. I am not unaware of the fact that real engraving is superior to laser engraving, but my hope in creating the design was that the laser engraving on this copper shell would be nice and subtle, and have its own thing going for itself…and be very cool in its own way. I think I achieved that. I love the vibe of the laser engraving on this shell. i completed the snare with no flange hoops and claws to fit the vibe.

 

The Sound: i traditionally have always played deeper snares. My 5.5 aluminum was the first shallower snare i really liked. My experience with with 14x4 snares is very limited. i spent a little time setting up a friends 20’s nob, but i only spent an hour or so with it…and never recorded it or used it live…so I didn’t really form much of an opinion on it besides being so impressed with how low and beefy it could sound. Having Vukan make this snare for me was definitely an experiment for me. To be honest I wasn’t 100 positive I’d like the size of it. Well, i received this and started playing it…and I was impressed…I quickly recorded it…and really liked the tones I got. The feel was great. It was very sensitive. It felt big to me, despite being shallow. I told Vukan, “man this is a great snare, I like it.” All was well…and then i took it to the gig…and it blew my mind. i listened in the big PA, while my buddy played, and my mouth dropped. It sounded so thick and full with incredible punch. it was clean and crisp and sounded perfect. I’ve used it the past few weekends live, and it is just killing. Right now, it is my favorite snare to play.

 

I think in general its range is more on the higher side. It doesn’t go as low as my 6.5 snares, but still has a very nice low range. It can definitely get in the upper stratosphere/high cracking piccolo range…but I likely won’t use it like that. For a low tuning player like myself, it may not do stupid low…but the place i have been tuning it for live playing has been perfect and given me the exact sound i am looking for.  

 

Summing it up:  This snare rocks!  To my amazement, its become my favorite snare. It is sensitive and very full sounding. It has a very unique visual design that has character and looks classy. This snare is an incredible surprise that will stay on my stand frequently in the near future.

 

VIDEO DEMO HERE:

https://youtu.be/KV-1fT7z6gE


Do you have a GOAT?

05 February 2018 - 01:25 PM

So i was thinking last night as I was watching the Super Bowl about the term "greatest of all time" and it got me thinking about drums and recently how happy I have been with my seamless steel kit, and I told a friend it was my goat kit I thought...the best sounding/feeling I had owned. In the drum world, I have been hesitant to make such claims until now, but I was curious if any of my fellow DFO brothers or sisters have a kit they own that they would say is the greatest kit they have ever owned/heard/played? I thought it may make for some interesting discussions.

Seamless v. Seamed/welded/riveted etc.

22 January 2018 - 03:19 PM

Not sure if this topic has been exhausted on DFO before, but I was a little take aback at a thread that I saw on Facebook lately, where the topic of seamless v. seamed was raised, and it almost felt like there was a consensus on that thread that there was very little to no difference between the two types on construction...and was written off as marketing hype...now granted, the majority of commenters make money selling seamed metal drums, so I don't know if that played a role in it...but I felt annoyed, because in my experience, little to no audible difference has not be the case between a sheet metal shell and a spun one for me. I was hoping to raise a healthy discussion about it here. Thoughts?


Oriollo Mangana Kit - OFFICIAL REVIEW- Seamless Spun Steel Drumset

15 January 2018 - 02:45 PM

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The back-story: I think its pretty safe to say that by now, if you haven’t figured it out, I am a big fan of Oriollo drums. From my first 5.5 phantom, to the latest steel snare I purchased, these drums have consistently given me incredible tones and a wonderful playing experience. This is why I spent so much of my time and resources promoting this company and helping with these videos. I love supporting innovative products, and its super fun seeing all that Vukan develops over time. That being said, I often wonder if there will be a time that I sit down to write one of these reviews, where I am not super impressed with something Vukan has sent me, and I don’t think its just absolutely wonderful. Spoiler alert…this is not one of those times. 

 

The original seamless spun phantom kit was a revelation in sound for me. There is nothing on the market that sounds and plays like those kits. If you haven’t had a chance to play one, check out Oriollo at NAMM and try one. They simply are wonderful..and what I choose to play daily for everything I do out of the 50+ kits I have owned. That is my sound and I proudly have proclaimed it on DFO for a long time…so when Vukan tells me he is developing a seamless spun manganese steel kit, and that he thinks it may sound better than the phantom kit…well that is something that really caught my attention. 

 

Arrival/Unboxing: Through a fairly intensive development process that has been occurring behind the scenes for the last few months, Vukan and his team was able to develop their machines to be able to spin manganese steel. Creating a seamless spun drumset out of aluminum was a big deal. Oriollo was the first to do it. Creating the first ever seamless spun steel kit, is even a bigger deal, because spinning steel is probably the hardest metal to spin next to brass. It is rigid and hard, and not as malleable. It takes a lot of force to manually spin the large diameter shells, so being able to accomplish creating this kit is a major accomplishment. Vukan and his team get a standing ovation for pushing the limits of what is possible when making a drumkit.

 

That being said, Vukan was in the final developments of the steel kit when we begin to flesh out all of the details of the new kit. I was going to be able to buy his prototypes. We picked a finish, talked about lugs and spacing, and put things into motion. He sent pics of the finish, which I thought was amazing, and he boxed everything up and sent it to me from Serbia. The kit arrived in a little less than two weeks. The kit was incredibly well packed…and I began to remove everything and assemble this kit to start exploring its sound. 

 

How it's made: This steel kit is made similarly to the aluminum. A flat piece of metal is spun over a mandrel to form a seamless shell, and then the edges are pressed to create a finished shell. From my discussions with Vukan, this process was much more difficult for the steel. Large sizes are manually spun on a machine, and I was told this seriously wore out the person spinning. Something about that is fascinating to me. The very first run of spinning resulted in shallower depths on the kick and 16” tom. Vukan fully expects to be able to spin up to a 14” depth, but as anything difficult goes, practice makes perfect. In the case of my prototypes, I actually thought the shallower depths might sonically be an advantage, so instead of waiting for new shells to be spun, I decided to go with the current depths of my kit. 

 

The kit is finished with a patina and a lacquer…which resulted in a finish very similar to walnut lacquer.  I nicknamed it “walnut steel.” This looks magnificent in person…and it actually looks like a wood kit. Its very cool/interesting. The kit is finished with the current production lug, and I chose to outfit it with triple flanged hoops and coated ambassadors on the toms. I am seriously considering changing the triple flanged hoops to a traditional blond wood hoop with walnut inlay at some point, mainly for the visual. The floor tom and kick are outfitted with the standard gibraltar round mount. I will say these work just fine, but I look forward to what Vukan will eventually create in house. I think they will bring a continuity that is attractive. 

 

One area the steel is very different is weight. It is about three times heavier than the aluminum. Because the aluminum is so light, that results in the steel feeling kind of just like a heavier wood kit, but it is something to note, if the attraction to the aluminum is its weight. 

 

The Sound: Living up to my love of the aluminum kit is a tall order, but this seamless steel kit has exceeded my expectations. Just like the snares, each of these kits has their own flavor, that can stand on its own, but for me, the flavor of the steel is a bit preferred. The steel kit is so incredibly full with such a meaty low end. Theres more top end to the toms and kick…resulting in a bit more bite, and the shells are a bit more focused, resulting in a greater clarity of tone. I don’t say all of this to take anything away from the aluminum kit…it is also wonderful…but there was something special about this steel kit that really attracted me to it. Its slightly more aggressive nature and clear tone is just a joy to play and really shined in the kick drum. This kick drum has some serious nuts to it. The aluminum is less focused and wider…it is breathier and feels kind of airy. The steel is more in your face and punches you right in the gut. It is two different sounds, and I like having the option of either…but I must admit, I found the extra oomph to the steel pretty captivating from behind the kit, especially in a live setting.  I will also say, I was incredibly impressed with the way the steel recorded. I felt like I didn’t have to do anything to the kit for it to just sound perfect. I was really impressed with its tuning range as well. 

 

Summing it up: Oriollo has made me three absolutely incredible kits (2 aluminum and a steel) and each have their own unique voice that I know will continue to be very useful to me. The steel comes into the picture with a unique quality of sound and feel that makes it a true joy to play, and a sound that can hold its own really to anything on the market, if not blow it away. It makes me think of what an amazing time it is to be a drummer and to have options on the market like these kits. With these kits available, and Oriollo in development of a spun copper kit and diecast lugs and claws, it just blows me away the innovation this company is creating for drummers, and what will be available soon. I never knew metal drums could be so musical and sound so good. I am really grateful to be a part of this. Hats of to Oriollo.

 

A quick note about the video review/recording. I am not a fan of the minimalist approach of recording with a crappy audio recorder and a single mic and calling it more genuine. In my experience, what this does, is actually feature the room the kit is in, rather than the kit itself. Trying to hear a kit with that setup requires a very well treated room, which often isn't the case. My approach is that I try to use a setup that will feature the actual sound of the kit. I occasionally do a small amount of reductive eq...never adding anything...but taking a few things away that are caused from close mic recording. I add a bit of compression to glue everything together. On this video, I used the overheads in recorderman with very minimal processing, and let those be the most dominant in the mix, to try and get a natural sound. The close mics act more as a filler. I say all that to say, I believe the sound of the video is very similar to what you'd actually hear in that space. 

Here is the link to the video review:

 

 

 

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Oriollo Seamless Steel Drumset- Video Preview!

06 January 2018 - 11:04 PM

Hey all! Just got this amazing kit in the mail yesterday, and while I am going to do a full blown review and demo for you guys, I wanted to share some pics and a quick clip. The kit is wonderful...I don't know how Vukan created something I like as much if not more as the aluminum kit, but this kit has beautiful warm, full, and punchy tone, while still being clean and clear.

The finish is rad...its patina under lacquer and really looks like wood. Sizes are 22X11, 16X12, and 13X6.5. The clip is recorded in my studio which is probably slightly more processed/close mic driven than I will do for the full demo...but this is how I would record them for a record. Tunings are around 110hz, 70hz on the toms...pretty standard for me but obviously I'll do higher tunings in the full demo. Im really blown away. Anyways, on to the media!

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https://youtu.be/2t-AM2sFskI