Hardware Weight Loss Program

Discussion in 'General' started by gwbasley, Sep 16, 2018.

  1. gwbasley

    gwbasley DFO Veteran

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    After previous success in cutting some pounds from my throne base I decided to do the same for my other stands as well. After a trip to Lowes for the aluminum and a few hours in my garage I have 2 cymbal stands done. The net result is 1 1/2 lbs each in weight reduction, ( I use 4 cymbal stands so that is a reduction of 6 lbs.), and a cost of $15.00 each. They are equally sturdy as the steel legs even with a 20" ride.

    This is what got me started...the Throne base:

    Lightweight Throne Base.jpg

    Cymbal stand before the conversion:

    Stand before.JPG

    ...after:

    Stand after (1).JPG

    If I do the same to my HiHat and Snare stand I can probably get cut 10lbs. off the load...that would be significant.
     
  2. AustinFitz

    AustinFitz Well-Known Member

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    Awesome! Really nice work you did there. I love DIY stuff like this.
     
  3. rondrums51

    rondrums51 rondrums51

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    Did you punch out the rivets and install new ones? This is very cool.
     
  4. funkypoodle

    funkypoodle DFO Veteran

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    Great stuff!
     
  5. gwbasley

    gwbasley DFO Veteran

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    I drilled the head off and punched them out. The stands are Dixons, made in China and metric, so I drilled them out for 3/16ths US pop rivets. I wasn't sure if the 1/8" X 1/2" aluminum would be sturdy enough but it came out solid.

    I know that several of our older members have solved this problem by breaking the load into two bags, but for myself having had 2 hip replacements, the number of trips is a big factor. My goal now is to lighten the load!
     
  6. Boomer

    Boomer DFO Master

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    Great job fabricating those legs. What tool(s) did you use to shape the bends?
     
  7. gwbasley

    gwbasley DFO Veteran

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    Nothing fancy, I bent the aluminum in my vise with the help of a wooden mallet. Basically I copied the old steel leg and then used it as a template to drill the holes exactly the same as they were before. The only thing I changed was leaving them straight at the ends where the rubber feet attach...otherwise it was just a copy.

    I also gave them a pass on the buffing wheel but that was just for looks and not function. I didn't bother to buff my ride stand because I put the legs almost flat and no one will see them anyway.
     
  8. Joe61

    Joe61 Member

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    Sir...you are a craftsman!
     
  9. MillerMav

    MillerMav Well-Known Member

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    That looks great! I did this with base tubes on some old Tama stands a while back but there isn't a great weight savings in that. I tried to do a set of legs but I lost patience before it worked out. Maybe I will take another stab at it this winter or something.
     
  10. gwbasley

    gwbasley DFO Veteran

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    There is more weight in the legs and braces than in the tubes. Add to that the difficulty in changing tubes and you really HAVE to polish them up....unless you are going for the "rat" look, but I think most of us like to keep our sets "blingy"

    Honestly, the polishing takes as much time as bending the legs to shape. I'm considering polishing the stock first before bending the next batch...then I could just run a "touch-up" on them after I'm done.
     

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