So you cant read..

Discussion in 'The Teachers Lounge' started by wayne, Aug 28, 2018.

  1. wayne

    wayne Very well Known Member

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    Anyone out here that considers themselves an above average player, not a reader, but would like to teach?..I can get through the first couple of books, but would have a hard time explaining how and why I do things to an intermediate level player using books.
    Should I just take them as far as I can in the books and then suggest a better reader for them?
     
  2. Hop

    Hop Very well Known Member

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    Hmmm... I think everybody's got something to offer. I don't see a big issue with bringing a person as far as you can take them. I think a problem arises if somebody isn't aware of their limitations and tries to BS their way through something inaccurately and leaves bad habits or a distaste for learning.

    What level or books are you stuck at? I ask because there are many different ways to play the same material, like the Ted Reed book for example (or even the Bellson book). Are your students wanting to jump into Wilcoxon, Whaley, Cirone etc. or is it more drumset related technique books or actual song charts that are at that next plateau???
     
  3. bigbonzo

    bigbonzo DFO Master

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    I don't think you should be teaching beginners at all. Perhaps advanced students that want to improve technique or something similar.

    Improve your reading skills, then teach.
     
  4. Pounder

    Pounder DFO Master

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    The problem I have with non-readers teaching, is, as soon as you get anywhere near complicated stuff, you've run out of gas on that truck. You took them so far and then where have you left them? I agree with bigbonzo, a prospective teacher should learn to read and write notationally, so that there will be no lack of understanding when they get ready to take the next step in learning drums, whether that step be learning to play vibes, tympani, classical drumming, rudiments, whatever.

    If you are in a position to work on your reading to the extent that you remain one step ahead of your student, that should be sufficient. But if you find yourself shying away from areas of interest the student has because it requires more reading than you're prepared to have a teacher's knowledge of, you should try to help the student find a different teacher. One of the most difficult things to do is to be honest with yourself about it. The goal should be that your student is better than you are. So if you did stop teaching it should be way before you go as far as you can, so the transition would be smoother.
     
  5. hardbat

    hardbat Very well Known Member

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    I've always been curious how this would work. How would you write down what they are supposed to be practicing? Or is the student expected to remember? I'm not trying to criticize, just honestly curious -- I don't know how I would teach without music notation, but I am sure that it is being done somehow.
     
  6. wayne

    wayne Very well Known Member

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    Great advise here, much appreciated. Just to clarify. I have no problem reading rudiments and various exercises, its just the jump into the next stage where you begin adding the other drums, cymbals, hats etc into the mix. Im fortunate to be working with 5 beginners so it wont be a concern for awhile.
    I think I can accept the level of my drum reading skills since i am retired, but i do have an interest in learning piano which i can take at the school i work at. If I could play along with the kids at least they would have experience listening to another instrument while they play...thx
     
  7. rculberson

    rculberson Very well Known Member

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    I'm not a very good reader. I can figure out a chart if you give me some time with it. Certainly a horrible sight reader. However, there are people in my little corner of the universe that want to know how I do what I do and are willing to pay me for it. I always warn them beforehand that I'm not a "real" teacher and refer them to several different qualified instructors (who all happen to be friends of mine). Even after the warnings, I still have 4 or 5 regular students. We work out of the Bellson 4/4 book most of the time, so they have something to look at/refer to when they take the lesson home to work on.
     
  8. jaymandude

    jaymandude Very well Known Member

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    This might not be pertinant, but it's my situation so I'll chime in. I'm well about average, both playing and reading. I'm a professional player who has recently gotten into teaching because people asked me for help and word got around.

    I have concluded I do not, at all, like teaching beginners. I don't have the patience nor the desire to teach someone how to read. My skill is in intermediate to advanced. Ted Reed/Alan Dawson/Hand Technique and rudiments, also using recordings ( Motown, Meters, James Brown, Blue Note) and examples and metaphors. Unfortunately I see around me a cookie cutter approach to teaching beginners, I can understand teaching them how to read snare drum. But drum set ? You're going have a 6th or 7th grade kid reading drum set music ? I don't understand the point, but that's me. I prefer Dawson and Gary Chafee stuff, ostinatos and ' beats" while reading a line for coordination and "independence". I prefer to teach how to figure things out for themselves, as well as play drums. It doesn't work with everyone..

    Good luck with everything, I hope this works out for you...
     
  9. nanashi

    nanashi Very well Known Member

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    If you can read snare drum music, the only difference is that it's spread out over several lines. Don't over think. The note and rest values are the same. This is where coordination is important. Figure each line separately then add and combine different combinations until you feel comfortable. It's really matter of practice. Even if you cannot play it, if you can understand the placement you should be able to follow what the student is doing.
     
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  10. Hop

    Hop Very well Known Member

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    I'd suggest just getting some basic practical experience by writing out some really simple fills or tom beats that you are already familiar with or already play.
    The next step would be to write out or chart out some simple songs that you're no stranger to.

    If you're not familiar how to write musical notation, then I would look into a text book or community college class to get going on that.

    Additionally, you could engage students by working with them to learn a fill by writing it out then practicing / playing it.
     
  11. BlackPearl

    BlackPearl Well-Known Member

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    I suspect you didn't mean to say you're about average ?
     
  12. hardbat

    hardbat Very well Known Member

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    As a teacher, being able to read isn't just about having the student read music, but also about having the student write music.
     
  13. wayne

    wayne Very well Known Member

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    Hardbat...That makes sense in so many ways!!..I write out cheat sheets for myself all the time, so why not get the kids to do it also. That gives them no excuse for not completing the task...thx for turning on the light!!
     
  14. hardbat

    hardbat Very well Known Member

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    Yeah, a great assignment is to have a student transcribe something off of a recording, and then practice it.
     
  15. Hop

    Hop Very well Known Member

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    I agree, transcribing will improve their understanding.
     
  16. hardbat

    hardbat Very well Known Member

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    It's also a skill they can use in many different ways, for the rest of their life.
     
  17. Pounder

    Pounder DFO Master

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    Take some piano lessons. it would make reading drum set seem very easy.
     
  18. wayne

    wayne Very well Known Member

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    Quick update; I,ve been teaching for about 3 weeks now and im using the Mattingly/Morganstein book Drumset Musician. Its very good and user friendly and explains a lot of things that teachers take for granted. I think this is going to be very enjoyable, and i thank you guys for the great advise...drum away!!
     

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