header.nohb.html

Recent content by RayB

  1. R

    Your personal gig dress code

    We all have little habits, superstitious and rituals. We present an image of ourselves we feel comfortable with. I don't wear jeans on a gig, and after set-up and sound check, I change into a nice shirt. It's a little ritual that works for me. Some guys could care less about that. No matter...
  2. R

    How did you feel when you found out your drum hero didn’t play on a track?

    I always felt the drums on "Sexy Sadie" was the best Ringo ever played. Except it was Paul McCartney on drums, not Ringo. I was shocked when I found that out. Paul also played on "Back in the USSR", "Ballad of John and Yoko" and probably some other cuts. Turns out in their early days before...
  3. R

    Ringo......

    The Purdie story was debunked a long time ago. He claimed Beatle manager Brian Epstein came to NY with master tapes and hired him to overdub drum parts. Story was checked out a million times and those master tapes were never in Epstein's possession. Given the recording technology at the time, it...
  4. R

    Your personal gig dress code

    When I used to see jazz musicians from the old days performing, they always wore a suit and tie. It seemed so classy to me. Look at photos of jazz greats during recording sessions in the 1930s-40's. They almost always wore suits and ties! The drummers, too. Sometimes they'd take the jacket off...
  5. R

    Your personal gig dress code

    I make every effort to be friendly and polite when I'm on a break. Compliments are nice; always accept graciously. Don't mind chatting about music, either. BUT: I must've had a hundred bar conversations starting with a guy telling me how great X is. I acknowledge I dig X, too. Then it goes to...
  6. R

    Berlioz, Rimsky-Korsakov: Great drum parts!

    I made it to All-City Orchestra way back in high school. Fish out of water because I was a drumset rock guy. Very little classical exposure, but I did well enough in my high school band and orchestra to earn an audition. Completely different from playing the set, but I loved it and learned so...
  7. R

    Interesting view of jazz and black culture

    I couldn't agree more, mattr. There is a positive way to look back. Though it was often music from way before my time, I felt so much joy discovering the music of Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Miles, Wes Mongomery, Coleman Hawkins, Ben Webster, Lester Young, Charlie Parker, Monk, Billie...
  8. R

    Interesting view of jazz and black culture

    I was fortunate to see Ray Brown play a few times. Still my all time favorite bassist. What a beautiful sound, always tasteful. When he walked on the bass, what's the old saying: "he could swing you to bad heallh!" The musicians he played with... But I digress. It's well known that in Charlie...
  9. R

    Interesting view of jazz and black culture

    I'm guilty of making generalizations. Contrasting Jo Jones, one of the greatest ever, with just any drummer coming out of a university jazz program is extremely unfair. Agreed. And I'm neglecting to mention how many brilliant jazz musicians came out of academic institutions. Max Roach and Miles...
  10. R

    Interesting view of jazz and black culture

    Universities are profit centers. Many university presidents are increasingly lawyers. They have to stay relevant to attract students willing to pay a fortune to go there. I always think there will be a university rock program where you can learn how to overdose and enter rehab like a real rock...
  11. R

    Interesting view of jazz and black culture

    It didn't kill it in the 60's because a majority of jazz musicians at the time came of age way before then. I would say going forward from the 60's, the university educated jazz musician increasingly had more chops than older generations but less spirit and relevance . For example, Jo Jones ran...
  12. R

    Interesting view of jazz and black culture

    Amen, I agree 110%.
  13. R

    Interesting view of jazz and black culture

    With all due respect, Greg Tate is not addressing how jazz ceased to play a major role in pop and dance music. He's addressing the current status of jazz in the African American community. After jazz ceased to be dominant in the overall culture, black artists Miles, Mingus, Wes Montgomery...
  14. R

    Interesting view of jazz and black culture

    I agree with you 100%. I posted the piece from Harper's magazine because I found it thought-provoking and wanted to hear the response from fellow drummers. I respect everyone's point of view and it's great to hear that "jazz" is indeed happening in various communities. Of course jazz, whatever...
Top