“Dragon’s breath”

Pibroch

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Am really into the nuances of cymbal sounds but, despite lots of internet searching, have yet to discover what this wonderful sounding term refers to!

Some say it denotes trashiness in the wash. Some say an “airy” element of trash. Others say “the ahh sound” which, to me, suggests almost the opposite of trashy !!!

Would love any cymbal lovers with plenty of experience to offer their responses please - I don’t want to die not knowing.
 

D. B. Cooper

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I thought that it commonly referred to characteristics of asian made cymbals like those that Wuhan makes. I though the "dragon" was in some way a reference to China. I think trash and airiness comes close, but I think of the dissonant, dark, sometimes strange wash that comes from a cymbal that is made with asian alloy.
 

dogmanaut

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I’ve actually personally seen it used most in reference to some Turkish cymbals — specifically Agops (and possibly in every instance by the same member here on DFO, so take that for what it’s worth...).

Curious to hear what other people say, though. I feel like I have a sense of what it means, but I’m always a little surprised by the lack of consensus in describing cymbal sounds. Makes me feel like even trying to put it into words sometimes is kind of futile.
 

JDA

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something that was discussed on Cymbalholic for like 40 years ( 12 in internet years..) You'll know it when you come across it.. When you get a cymbal all worked up and warmed up (riding it with the Tip of the stick) The Highs and the Lows are excited and the middle (the mids) don't activate.

Hi and lows and a middle hole; is one view (no mids)

It's in the design or happenstance of some cymbals.
Frost was another word used. Highs and lows with a mid freq. hole. Highs, Lows. No mids..
Crispy Critter was also another term.

If you were ever a member you can still log in a search Cymbalholic.
Search terms like " Frost" " Dragon" Mid Freq Hole.. or "breath"
 
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JDA

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a Hand hammered 20" Thin with an extreme bow (umbrella-like) will froth all over the place.. to the point where there is not only no mids but no lows either. Upper end frost only.
Had 20" Reuther Taiwan 20 like that . Also most recently had (seller demo below) a low weight 20" New Stamp ---> all and only upper frequencies. That is called "all frosting no cake" endemic of many (majority of) low weight New Stamp 20's.

I keep a 2009g 20" New Stamp K and it has a balance of mids lows and highs. So what a difference" 200gs can make between thin cymbals. There's a threshold where, if bowed and thin, the result is all highs. The lows were inadvertently either hammered or knocked out. Inadvertently of course. I could get NO lows from that cymbal --> because there weren't any--> they were defeated (unintentionally) "by" the particular peculiar build -all frosting no cake build sound.

 
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D. B. Cooper

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a Hand hammered 20" Thin with an extreme bow (umbrella-like) will froth all over the place.. to the point where there is not only no mids but no lows either. Upper end frost only.
Had 20" Reuther Taiwan 20 like that . Also most recently had (seller demo below) a low weight 20" New Stamp ---> all and only upper frequencies. That is called "all frosting no cake" endemic of many (majority of) low weight New Stamp 20's.


Check out what I bought last night:
I'm thinking rivets might be in order...
 

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Drumbumcrumb

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It’s funny because I’ve never heard that term used but it’s EXACTLY what I call the sound of my 22” Istanbul 30th when you give it a good crash... A very distinctive bbbbwwwwWWAAAAAHHHH that you don’t hear from every cymbal. You hear it most clearly when you really crash it, but it’s lurking when you ride closer to the edge as well... percolating beneath the surface until you unleash it.
 

JazzDoc

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Am really into the nuances of cymbal sounds but, despite lots of internet searching, have yet to discover what this wonderful sounding term refers to!

Some say it denotes trashiness in the wash. Some say an “airy” element of trash. Others say “the ahh sound” which, to me, suggests almost the opposite of trashy !!!

Would love any cymbal lovers with plenty of experience to offer their responses please - I don’t want to die not knowing.
It's the sound of an Asian alloy Spizzichino ride. I had a 22" but while I was divesting (when we moved to a smaller place) I sold them. Like an idiot.
 

Seb77

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Agree it makes me think of old-style chinese cymbals (newer Dreams, Staggs etc. sound pretty tame in comparison). An evil, fierce, mean character. Paiste describes some cymbals as "dense mix", that's definitely part of it to me, a dense cluster of overtones, could also be called dissonant, but this might be too negative.
 

egw

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I always thought it referred to a low, roaring, underlying trashiness. Tony's Nefertiti ride comes to mind as a perfect example.

I used to have an Agop SE Jazz Ride that was nothing but low roar. It was so awesome that I got bored with it and sold it, because I'm an idiot and that's what we do.
 

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