1 up 1 down is awesome!

Derrick

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The more perfect solution would be to make the Bass drum a remote or cable operated device which could be moved to a more advantageous position in relation to the kit, allowing toms to be set at a reasonable height and within a reasonable circle of reach.

Don't hold your breath that this will catch on rapidly, the status quo has a lot of inertia .... Drum kit setups of today still mimic the big band era of the 1930s and 40s...
If you completely disassembled your kit and then started to assemble it bit by bit, based on how you play, What would it look like in the end? Bet it would not appear as kits do traditionally.

You would have to re-think micing in the studio as well. The overheads or the Glyn Johns method would be foobared.
 

swarfrat

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I'm still looking for 3 good tom samples, but if I can ever find them, 12 toms would fit in a 345mm x 319mm target that is only constrained to my bass drum by the length of the cable. I'm telling you guys - this is the future - not just of e-kits - it's the future of drums. I haven't tried micing yet but as tight as my kit is, I think it'd best be done with one overhead. Leave the parts which your ear is pickiest about to physical instruments. (The e-kits suck at cymbals and snares anyway). One mic, even more compact than 1u/1d.
 

Tornado

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The problem with mounting Toms to a bass drum has always been about controlling their height and proximity to the drummers circle of reach. This is the main reason we see so many kits today with short height toms.. Moving the toms of the bass drum is a benefit, but still creates problems with the circle of reach. The more perfect solution would be to make the Bass drum a remote or cable operated device which could be moved to a more advantageous position in relation to the kit, allowing toms to be set at a reasonable height and within a reasonable circle of reach.

Don't hold your breath that this will catch on rapidly, the status quo has a lot of inertia .... Drum kit setups of today still mimic the big band era of the 1930s and 40s...
If you completely disassembled your kit and then started to assemble it bit by bit, based on how you play, What would it look like in the end? Bet it would not appear as kits do traditionally.

It's not inertia from the big band era... It just makes sense. But we've had options like E-kits and, cable hats, or even the ability to offset the bass drum and play with a double pedal slave for decades.

As for tom height... Raise. Your. Seat. And sit up straight. I swear, most people who complain about standard sized toms (power toms may go to Hell) are just sitting too low and slouch.
 

Spoonman

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Well....now you have officially joined the shell bank club!!!!!
bt
Indeed, I too have helped stimulate the local economy with my shell bank. But at the same time, when playing live, in mostly small clubs, and shuffling hear in between bands, I still go for the 1up and 1down set up. Sometimes 2down if the stage is bigger. Like many have said, it does promote creativity and being very much smart with your fills. You can do so much sigh so little…
Below is my stage setup from
Last night…which was the first time we played out since Jan’20
55433806-78BB-496E-9962-B9F5BCFAF37D.jpeg

And my shell bank…
7DC732C3-54D9-4266-B309-8126A4622110.jpeg
 

paul

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One of the advantages I've found with using a rack is the de-linking of bass drum and small toms, making positioning of both much easier.
 

slow larry

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I play 1u1d/1u2d/2u2d on the same set with minimal changes. The ride cymbal stays in the better, closer location in all the set ups. The 2nd rack tom goes to the left of the main rack tom on a double tom stand, 2nd 16' floor tom in the usual spot to the right of the 14'. If I don't need all the toms the highest and lowest are easily removed and I'm back to 1u1d.

Its less about number of drums than not allowing a tom to park on the biggest piece of prime real estate on the kit, the place where a right handed drummer's right hand naturally falls. I sometimes put a ride-hat (doesnt open, set to sizzle a bit) near the ride cymbal too if the songs we're playing make sense with the sticking, same with the toms: based on songs.
 

hsosdrum

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The standard 1-up/1-down setup invented by Krupa in 1935 caught on because it makes the most ergonomic sense:
  • It places the snare drum between the legs so it can be played with both arms relaxed at the drummer's sides
  • It places the ride cymbal above the right side of the bass drum, where it can be played by swiveling the right arm a few degrees clockwise from the snare drum playing position
  • It places the ride tom behind and slightly above the snare, where it can be played by only moving the elbows a couple of inches forward from the snare drum playing position
  • It places the floor tom to the right where it can be played by swiveling the torso clockwise at the waist
If one keeps these items in these positions, it becomes possible to expand the setup to 2-up/2-down without making any ergonomic compromises:
  • Place the additional ride tom to the left of the original one
  • Place the additional floor tom behind the original one
The added items do require more movement to reach, but the original items remain where they are easily accessible.​

This 2-up/2-down setup makes even more ergonomic sense for us double bass drum players, since it places both feet in a more natural playing position when seated facing directly towards the audience (without having to use remote pedals that add mechanical complexity and subtract smoothness of action). Additionally, the left-foot bass drum makes the perfect place to mount the second ride tom (and more cymbals — you can never have enough cymbals!).

And Tornado is 100% right in post #63: If you're having trouble reaching your toms, sit higher. Buddy Rich was 5'7" tall and always used a canister throne with a seat height that was 24" off the floor. Part of why he never had any trouble getting around the drums was that he set up everything where it made the most ergonomic sense. (When I was 15 I had the opportunity to sit behind Buddy's drumset and it was a revelation for me. )
 

gra7

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For over 20 years I played exclusively on a 20/12/14 kit. During 2020 I upgraded to a 22/12/16. While I enjoy playing the 22 kick more, I truly "missed" the 14” floor that I had become probably too used to playing. I ended up special ordering a 14" floor and now I am playing 22/12/14/16. I think if I had to, I could live without the 16” but it's really nice to have it. I also needed to raise my throne height a bit to properly accommodate playing to the second floor tom. I don't think I could ever play with more than 1 rack tom though - I just enjoy the position of the ride cymbal too much.
 
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swarfrat

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One up...check.
One down ... check

Somehow I think he arrived at a different conclusion than most of the folks here:
(wait for the bass drum - and note - the camera is not in line with the reso head.

 

swarfrat

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I'm not really a fan either, he mentioned in another video he was going for a sort of tympani effect. I have my 15" snare pitched up, but toms? There's no way I'd be tuning a 20" tom that high.
 


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