16th notes on the hat (single handed)

wflkurt

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Being a big VH fan since the early 80's pushed me to get my 16ths faster. Alex has got a pretty fast one handed 16th thing going on.

 

BennyK

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You'd be surprised how many times an Afuche Cabasa is used to flesh out hihat groupings on studio hits .
 

BennyK

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Slowly count the notes in one complete 1/2 rotation of the beads against the palm of your other hand . if your motion is consistent, the number should be repetitive . Now transfer those groupings onto the hihat, keeping your wrist motion consistent as well . For me there's a natural inflection of groups of three .
 

drums1225

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This is the granddaddy of one-handed 16th grooves. Much of it is not just a 2 and 4 backbeat, so that ups the ante in terms of difficulty, but you can really hear Clyde Stubblefield using the tip of the stick on the top of the hats, rather than the shoulder/tip, edge/top sound. I'm sure he's using some form of Moeller pumping motion to make this happen, but at this tempo it needs to be very compact. If you can make it through this whole tune, without your arm falling off, you can make it through just about any tune.

Of course, as others have mentioned, James Gadson is a master of the one-handed 16th groove. Check out Bill Withers Live at Carnegie Hall for several great examples.

Best,
Chris
 

Kcmcc

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This is the granddaddy of one-handed 16th grooves. Much of it is not just a 2 and 4 backbeat, so that ups the ante in terms of difficulty, but you can really hear Clyde Stubblefield using the tip of the stick on the top of the hats, rather than the shoulder/tip, edge/top sound. I'm sure he's using some form of Moeller pumping motion to make this happen, but at this tempo it needs to be very compact. If you can make it through this whole tune, without your arm falling off, you can make it through just about any tune.

Of course, as others have mentioned, James Gadson is a master of the one-handed 16th groove. Check out Bill Withers Live at Carnegie Hall for several great examples.

Best,
Chris
Just to add to the Gadson/Withers mention, Gadson plays the heck out of those grooves on the Carnegie hall album ("Ain't No Sunshine" and "Use Me" specifically), but Al Jackson was the drummer on "Ain't No Sunshine" in the studio. Gadson did play on the original of "Use Me" and of course "Kissing My Love" . . . Jim Gordon is also a master of this, check out this one:

 

mcjaco

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I've been working on the Tears for Fears song Everybody Wants to Rule the World; that one's easy to mess up the tempo and groove.
And the fact that's it really a drum machine for the hats, and then a snare hits as another track....I end up doing a syncopated beat on the hats with a lot of ghost notes on the snare to get the feel for that one. There's no real good way to replicate the studio version live, as even Tears for Fears has a back track for the hi hat rhythm during live shows.

I love watching this cover, as the band keeps turning around watching the drummer rip off 16th notes.

 

Elvis

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Playing 16th notes with speed and endurance on the hats with just my right hand is something I've struggled with. I get by most of the time using the two-handed technique, but there is a difference and sometimes it matters to the feel of the song (like a James Gadson groove).
So please share some tips or videos of techniques for building up speed.
I think the secret is to save it for slower tempos, like ballads. After a certain speed, it seems to lose something (and let's face it, 8th and 1/4's make life a lot easier at that point).
Also, I think you need to get a good "rhythm" going with your ride hand.
A little wrist action helps here (helps me, anyway). You get this undulation going between moving your hand and moving your forearm (counterbalances your hand) and it seems to take a lot of work out of playing the 16th note beat.
One last thing, a movement like that, at a fairly high rate of speed, would favour those who have faster "twitch muscles", so your problems may be just how you're built, too.

Elvis
 

Nacci

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I’m with you. I’m 48 and my hands have taken a beating in my life with several broken bones and just general abuse.

There are several songs that can give me fits such as “Santeria” and “Break On Through” and sometimes even “Folsom Prison” and “You Wreck Me”.

Depending what type of week I had working can really effect my ability to pull some of these off, especially in practice where we might do them two or three times in a row and sometimes back to back.

Well, it is no secret, you have to drill, woodshed and practice and build up the muscle memory and endurance...and maintain it too. I usually use wood tip sticks but if I know I am compromised will switched to Nylon tip because they rebound quicker. I always screen the set list prior to a show to make sure there is not three or four tunes in a row that will kill my right hand and on and on.

Basically, be as absolutely prepared as you can be but also skew everything in your favor that you can and maybe keep a flask of bourbon close by for a safety net if things get rough.
 


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