18x22 or 14x22

Cauldronics

DFO Master
Joined
Feb 14, 2011
Messages
5,142
Reaction score
205
Location
SF Bay Area
I never understand comments where it was the best drum ever. If it was me, I'd never get rid of it.
 

Geostorm98

Very well Known Member
Joined
Sep 16, 2014
Messages
1,423
Reaction score
73
Location
CT
What's your thoughts on these two sizes? I would assume the 14x22 would be a little more punchy. But is the 18x22 just to deep for general playing purposes? Or not?

Thanks
Let your ears decide. As far as an 18x22 being less portable that's true but an easy workaround; I've yet to encounter a vehicle or doorway that couldn't be managed.

Sound wise, I played my first 18x22 in '95, a Pearl Masters Custom, 4 ply maple shell. I couldn't believe the power and low end I was hearing in comparison to my 14x22 '75 Sonor Phonic, no slouch there. The 18 depth definitely required me to change my bass drum footwork as it responds slower. I tend to play off the head all night. If you bury the beater on an 18 depth the head slaps back, well it does for me anyway. Since then I haven't found a 14" depth that does what I need it to do, and really would like to downsize the bass drum. The ones I've tried sound great but are just missing something in the low end, from where I sit at least. It's likely more a personal, gut reaction than something that can be measured or agreed upon.

At any rate, I've been using that size for over 20 years in every sort of situation, general or otherwise. Probably things like the player, tuning and head choice, venue and amplification, etc play a larger role anyway but it's a valid question.
 

bellbrass

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 11, 2005
Messages
6,617
Reaction score
526
Location
Bluegrass of Kentucky
I've always been a 14 x 22 man. I just never liked power toms or 16"-18" bass drums. Even when I was in my twenties, i was old-school. However, I have some justification other than curmudgeonly stubbornness: I like where the beater hits a 14 x 22; for me, it hits right in the center when I have the height where i want it. I think drums sound best when struck right in the middle; especially bass drums.
 

MrDrums2112

"Normal" Drummer
Joined
Apr 23, 2012
Messages
4,331
Reaction score
363
Location
Tolland, CT
Cauldronics said:
I never understand comments where it was the best drum ever. If it was me, I'd never get rid of it.
I do still have the 14x22 Rogers and it's not going anywhere. The 14x20 I sold back to the man I bought them from (another forum member). He knew he had made a mistake the moment he sold the drums to me. I had them about 3 years, and now he's got them again. From that deal, I ended up with the 14x22 - the ne t best thing. :)
 

shuffle

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 31, 2009
Messages
5,993
Reaction score
458
Location
Reno/Tahoe
I lean towards 14" & 16"depths but my yammie basses are17" depth,go figure!
Plenty of punch and guts!
 

AtlantaDrumGuy

DFO Master
Joined
May 10, 2012
Messages
4,132
Reaction score
352
Location
Atlanta, GA
Well as many have said, 14 or 16 depth. 18 depth feels so different to me, not in a good way. The air needs to travel so far, and it does affect playability for me. Feels sluggish and also a hassle to carry. Honestly, I like the sound of 14 and 16 best too. I don't feel a big difference with 14 and 16, so I'm good with either.
 

rondrums51

rondrums51
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
9,735
Reaction score
964
Location
Southwest Florida
INDeDrum said:
14x22 is more punchy. More depth = more muddiness. And not fitting through doorways or in trunks of cars.
I used a 17 X 22 bass drum on a house gig for a few years. The drums belonged to the club, so I didn't have to bother setting up my own stuff, which was nice, but man, I hated that bass drum!

Muddy, like you said, Josh, and sloppy attack. I tried to improve things with muffling and tuning the heads tighter, but that killed the bass response.

I've had the same experience with 16" deep bass drums. Sorry, anything deeper than 14" doesn't work for me.

If you want a deep bass response, you get that from diameter, not depth.

I've often wondered why the standard depth on bass drums has pretty much become 16" or deeper. I don't see any acoustic science behind it. I think it's just trendy marketing bullshit because it looks cool or whatever.
 

Tmcfour

DFO Veteran
Joined
May 23, 2008
Messages
2,220
Reaction score
484
Location
Philadelphia
I was honestly suprised when I got my 18x22 set up that it wasn't as big sounding as my 16x22. So I'd have to say I would probably prefer the 14x22 over the 18x22.
 

A J

DFO Master
Joined
Feb 28, 2010
Messages
3,379
Reaction score
215
Location
Rockford, Michigan
Not sure about the 14" kicks, but I can actually hear a difference between a 16" depth bass drum and an 18". Maybe it's all in my mind, but I really like the 18" better.
 

mpthomson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2016
Messages
111
Reaction score
17
Horses for courses etc. I've got a Phonic 22x18 and an original Genista 22x16. The 18 is no harder to play than the 16 and I've never had a problem with the Sonor either with doors or vehicles. Love them both equally.
 

TDM

Yapping Internet Mutt
Joined
Oct 28, 2010
Messages
5,445
Reaction score
402
rondrums51 said:
I've often wondered why the standard depth on bass drums has pretty much become 16" or deeper. I don't see any acoustic science behind it.
There is plenty of science (or engineering, if you will) behind deeper drums. A deeper drum's resonance chamber has more cubic area. Similarly, a deeper drum's shell has more surface area. Both factors contribute to creating a louder, more powerful, fuller sounding note.

I find general conversations about "this size is better than that size" somewhat odd. Each size provides musical options. For example, notions that rack toms only sound good if they are 12 inches and larger seem ridiculous. Jack DeJohnette sure makes an 8 inch tom sound great! Gavin Harrison is another drummer for who an 8 inch tom is an important part of his sound. Jojo Mayer and Benny Greb choose a 10 inch rack tom as their primary tom. I watched Jack DeJohnette (live) using a 22x18 bass drum and that size didn't stop him in any way. He sounded great and so did the bass drum! Gavin Harrison used a 22x18 when I saw him live. Again, both sounded great.

Myself, I've used bass drums of many different diameters and depths. After gigging with a blues band using a 20x18 for a while, I swapped in a 20x14. My thinking was the 20x14 would be punchier and easier to move. I did one gig with the 20x14 before swapping the 20x18 back in. For that gig, I greatly preferred the 20x18 because it provided extra fullness and "muscle" that better suited the music and musicians involved. My own favorite bass drum sizes are 18x14 and 20x16, but the 20x18 worked better for that situation.

I'm not a fan of 22 inch bass drums and larger bass drums, simply because I don't want to move drums that big. However, I've used 22 inch (and larger) bass drums and they've all played and sounded great.
 

rondrums51

rondrums51
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
9,735
Reaction score
964
Location
Southwest Florida
TDM said:
I've often wondered why the standard depth on bass drums has pretty much become 16" or deeper. I don't see any acoustic science behind it.
There is plenty of science (or engineering, if you will) behind deeper drums. A deeper drum's resonance chamber has more cubic area. Similarly, a deeper drum's shell has more surface area. Both factors contribute to creating a louder, more powerful, fuller sounding note.
Yeah, I get that, but the deeper the drum, the sloppier and slower the response. Less attack and clarity. You really have to stomp the thing hard. But that's how most rock drummers play the bass drum.

Another thing is, I see drummers all the time who have 16" or 18" deep bass drums, and they have a hole in the front head and a bunch of laundry inside the drum. So they're canceling out any acoustic advantage, anyway. Of course, they're usually miked, and the sound guy provides the bass response, so it really doesn't matter how deep the drum is.

I'm probably out of the loop on this topic, anyway, because I normally play in acoustic jazz trios and quartets. A 14 X 18 bass drum does the job for me 99 percent of the time. But I know that guys playing louder stuff have a whole different concept.

Play what you like! :occasion5:
 

AtlantaDrumGuy

DFO Master
Joined
May 10, 2012
Messages
4,132
Reaction score
352
Location
Atlanta, GA
It's personal preference, but I never saw the point of deeper bass drums. It seems like a lengthy trend, but still, did not make good sense to me. 14 is plenty big and do not see any benefit for the increased depth outside of making the drum heavier and more difficult to position on stage.
 

Sequimite

DFO Veteran
Joined
Aug 24, 2010
Messages
1,971
Reaction score
147
Location
Sequim (skwim), Washington
My 18x22 Pork Pie bass drum is the preference among the musicians I've played with. It may be that the longer depth is particularly well suited to a "thin" 8-ply all maple bass. I play with no muffling. I tune it a bit higher than my 16 x 22 and 14 x 22 bass drums and subjectively I get a little more lower mid-range punch and stronger low end with no muddiness.

Depending on your vehicle the extra four inches can be a big deal. After my truck was totaled I could not fit the bass drum in my rental car and had to take my Handsonic and bass drum trigger. Worked out great as that venue has a great PA and sound man.
 

Tmcfour

DFO Veteran
Joined
May 23, 2008
Messages
2,220
Reaction score
484
Location
Philadelphia
rondrums51 said:
I've often wondered why the standard depth on bass drums has pretty much become 16" or deeper. I don't see any acoustic science behind it.
There is plenty of science (or engineering, if you will) behind deeper drums. A deeper drum's resonance chamber has more cubic area. Similarly, a deeper drum's shell has more surface area. Both factors contribute to creating a louder, more powerful, fuller sounding note.
Yeah, I get that, but the deeper the drum, the sloppier and slower the response. Less attack and clarity. You really have to stomp the thing hard. But that's how most rock drummers play the bass drum.

Another thing is, I see drummers all the time who have 16" or 18" deep bass drums, and they have a hole in the front head and a bunch of laundry inside the drum. So they're canceling out any acoustic advantage, anyway. Of course, they're usually miked, and the sound guy provides the bass response, so it really doesn't matter how deep the drum is.

I'm probably out of the loop on this topic, anyway, because I normally play in acoustic jazz trios and quartets. A 14 X 18 bass drum does the job for me 99 percent of the time. But I know that guys playing louder stuff have a whole different concept.

Play what you like! :occasion5:what you're saying is generally true. I'm an odd ball in the metal,hc,punk worlds in that I like my drums wide open. No muffle, no batter head port. Sound guys worth their salt know how to mic it. And you're right to each their own. But, my none muffled, unported 16x22 is bigger sounding than my non muffled unported 18x22. And yes I do play them both hard as a matter of generality.
 

TDM

Yapping Internet Mutt
Joined
Oct 28, 2010
Messages
5,445
Reaction score
402
rondrums51,

"Yeah, I get that, but the deeper the drum, the sloppier and slower the response. Less attack and clarity. You really have to stomp the thing hard. But that's how most rock drummers play the bass drum."

Depending on how a deeper bass drum is set up, you may or may not need to stomp on it. I saw Dave King with The Bad Plus and he used what looked like an 18x16 or 18x18. It was a very deep 18 inch bass drum. Granted, the whole kit was probably backline gear, but King used open (beater off the head) and closed (beater muting the head) bass drum techniques that really took advantage of that deep drum. He got beautiful, singing tones from it and muted, slapped tones, too. And, he did this all while playing triple pianissimo!

"Another thing is, I see drummers all the time who have 16" or 18" deep bass drums, and they have a hole in the front head and a bunch of laundry inside the drum. So they're canceling out any acoustic advantage, anyway."

Actually, they are not cancelling out the acoustic advantage because the deeper shell still provides a larger resonating chamber. Consider a ported speaker cabinet. If ported correctly, the cabinet obtains deeper and louder bass response.

"I'm probably out of the loop on this topic, anyway, because I normally play in acoustic jazz trios and quartets. A 14 X 18 bass drum does the job for me 99 percent of the time. But I know that guys playing louder stuff have a whole different concept."

Hey, I understand where you are coming from. I use an 18x14 or 16x12 bass drum for the majority of my gigs, which are acoustic gigs featuring jazz, Motown, folk, Broadway, and pop music. I don't need a larger bass drum. If I need to get louder, we put a microphone in the bass drum. Still, when driving a more electrified and louder band, I prefer a larger bass drum, as long as I don't have to move it!
 


Top