2 Snares......your wood choice and your metal choice!!!!

Tdipaul

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After years of experimenting ( which = mucho $$$) I'm down to one, an LM402

It can handle anything and is known to sound good.

So if someone says it doesn't , then I know its me.

.
 
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kzac

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As an engineer, I discovered long ago that the material used to manufacture drum shells, has very little to do with drum sound. Drum sound is completely relative to the drum heads and how they contact a drum shell (bearing edges), how they are held in tension and the relative ambient air quality. The purpose of the shell is to provide structure for the tension assemblies and provide air pressure control, the shells purpose is not to provide sound.

A harmonic is “a sinusoidal component of a periodic wave, and its what we normally see as drummers with metal tension components which have a much higher frequency compared to wood or other less dense materials.. harmonics are what drive recording engineers completely batty and they are the reason your new drum kit comes with gaskets mounted between the tension lug and the shell, and plastic dampening rings mounted inside the tension lug. These harmonics can create high frequency tones which can cancel out drum sound. If your playing live, remove all this crap from your kit, you don't need it. if you are playing in a recording studio, then you will need it. Shells can contribute to (Amplify) Sinusoidal harmonics coming from the tension assemblies. This is not something live play will bear out, but recording microphones can pickup these harmonics.

Therefore in engineering terms, the attributes which make very good drum sound are the following:
1- Truly round shell, which can contain air pressure, and provide tension assembly structure.
2- A bearing edge that is "in plane" level relative to the shell side or wall (some refer to this as flatness)
3- A bearing edge that is smooth and complete, having no gaps or jagged edges, it allows the head to move across the edge without creeping or catching (building then releasing tension)
4- Tension devices (including Lugs, tension rods, springs, hoops etc. ) which can maintain consistent and even tension of the head against the bearing edge
5- Air pressure control inside the shell, (usually that little round hole on the side of the shell, called a "Vent hole")
6- Drum shell depth, which controls the air pressure acting upon the resonant head, by an impacted batter head.

Think about Roto toms... what type of shell do they have? And yet they produce very good tom sound ...
What would happen to the roto tom if you added a shell and resonant head to that setup? And what if we added snares to that resonant head?

Are there drums which sound perfectly acceptable which are made of materials other than metal or wood? how about plastics (acrylic and fiberglass).

But don't take my word for it..... grab that old tom or snare out of the closet and perform your own tests. and see what happens. Experimenting on such items will provide sound answers to the engineering behind the construct of a drum. It will fade marketing hype away and leave one with the reality of applied engineering techniques.
 
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ArtieFufkin

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My favorite wood is a Custom built Eames 24-ply Birch shell.
My favorite metal: I bought a Pearl Brass snare in 1990 when I got out of college. It sounds amazing and loud as hell! Both are 6.5x14. I run Evans - either Coated reverse dot or coated hydraulic snare heads.
 

Monday317

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At mo my wood drum fav (After classic Maple)
Is my Dixon cornerstone Maple 6.5x14.. wood hoops ..fat deep tone with amazng throaty sound.. wood hoop s ar just the ticket on this Drum..
Metal ALWAYS Gretsch COB 6.5.... does it ALL...
Nothing come s close

Yours?
Gerry
Easy: Wood - Pearl Omar Hakim signature mahogany. 13 X 5, tunes to sound like nearly anything imaginable, though not earsplitting.
Metal - Ludwig Supra, 14 x 5 (I'm more partial to tube lugs, but Imperials are acceptable). Runner up is a close second - Pearl Brass Sensitone II. Wish I still had mine...
 

Monday317

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As an engineer, I discovered long ago that the material used to manufacture drum shells, has very little to do with drum sound. Drum sound is completely relative to the drum heads and how they contact a drum shell (bearing edges), how they are held in tension and the relative ambient air quality. The purpose of the shell is to structure tor the tension assemblies and provide air pressure control, it is not to provide sound.

A harmonic is “a sinusoidal component of a periodic wave, and its what we normally see as drummers with metal tension components which have a much higher frequency compared to wood or other less dense materials.. harmonics are what drive recording engineers completely batty and they are the reason your new drum kit comes with gaskets mounted between the tension lug and the shell, and plastic dampening rings mounted inside the tension lug. These harmonics can create high frequency tones which can cancel out drum sound. If your playing live, remove all this crap from your kit, you don't need it. if you are playing in a recording studio, then you will need it. Shells can contribute to (Amplify) Sinusoidal harmonics coming from the tension assemblies. This is not something live play will bear out, but recording microphones can pickup these harmonics.

Therefore in engineering terms, the attributes which make very good drum sound are the following:
1- Truly round shell, which can contain air pressure.
2- A bearing edge that is "in plane" level relative to the shell side or wall (some refer to this as flatness)
3- A bearing edge that is smooth and complete, having no gaps or jagged edges, it allows the head to move across the edge without creeping or catching (building then releasing tension)
4- Tension devices (including Lugs, tension rods, springs, hoops etc. ) which can maintain consistent and even tension of the head against the bearing edge
5- Air pressure control inside the shell, (usually that little round hole on the side of the shell, called a "Vent hole")
6- Drum shell depth, which controls the air pressure acting upon the resonant head, by an impacted batter head.

Think about Roto toms... what type of shell do they have? And yet they produce very good tom sound ...
What would happen to the roto tom if you added a shell and resonant head to that setup? And what if we added snares to that resonant head?

Are there drums which sound perfectly acceptable which are made of materials other than metal or wood? how about plastics (acrylic and fiberglass).

But don't take my word for it..... grab that old tom or snare out of the closet and perform your own tests. and see what happens. Experimenting on such items will provide sound answers to the engineering behind the construct of a drum. It will fade marketing hype away and leave one with the reality of applied engineering techniques.
As an engineer, I largely agree--however I have found many sonic differences between say, a steel shell and a mahogany shell, with identically sized and headed drums. That said, I will grant you the inverse square law seems to hit overtones hard and from, say, 3 meters and farther, these differences drop right off and disappear completely when mic'd for amplification only. Under recording conditions the producer's board can make any drum sound like anything at all, so under those circumstances, I couldn't agree with you more.

All that said, I wouldn't dare bet a nickel to try and prove you completely incorrect, since our perceptions are so utterly individualized as a whole and yeah, RotoToms do sound quite good. I halted my own work on a drum kit made from old ('90s) Pearl Export shells and am thinking more of a Arbiter Flats kind of setup.

Further bulletins as events warrant...
 

Genr

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I am fortunate to own a number of wonderful snare drums, N&C, Craviotto, Ludwig precious metals, Gretsch, Rogers wood Dynasonic…. I am hard pressed to choose a favorite, but one drum I do want to mention is my 6x14 wood hoop Allegra. While it does not have notoriety of some of these other brands, I find it to be a fabulous drum that will hold its own with anything out there. Check one out if you get the chance, it think you will be impressed.
 

JDA

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ACRO- man Samples via an MD advertisement...


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The ACRO-MAN pack includes:
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Masecar

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Wood: 6.5x14 DW Craviotto maple. I've got Yamaha Power Hoops on it and it sounds magnificent.

Metal: 6.5x14 Black Beauty. With an S Hoop on top. Fat.
 
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Elvis

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I am fortunate to own a number of wonderful snare drums, N&C, Craviotto, Ludwig precious metals, Gretsch, Rogers wood Dynasonic…. I am hard pressed to choose a favorite, but one drum I do want to mention is my 6x14 wood hoop Allegra. While it does not have notoriety of some of these other brands, I find it to be a fabulous drum that will hold its own with anything out there. Check one out if you get the chance, it think you will be impressed.
Wasn't Allegra based in Oregon in the 90's and "invented" the lugged bass drum hoop?
 

jsadowski321

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Dear JDA...

It's possible during those days that making quality "metal" shells was more difficult, perhaps. Also, making a wood snare matched the other drums, so
that could be why, too. (We've come quite a long way since then!) I love wood and metal snares for different reasons, but I find that wood snares sit into my (live) drum mix and blend a little better, but metal offers a little more volume and increased snare sensitivity. I'm sure there are plenty of other good reasons why some of the best (back then) stuck to wood too, but since we're on the subject of the best wood and metal snares...I'm going to say it's a perfect tie for each one of these...For Wood: Eames 9ply Birch 13x5.5" or a Mapex 8ply Maple / Walnut 14x5.5" Velvetone. These do it all in every volume and tuning range. For Metal: Oriollo 13x5" Steel or a Mapex 14x5.5" Blade. I LOVE my Eames and Oriollo for custom drums...However, for "off the shelf" ready, Mapex is not my favorite brand, but I've had about 35 different snare drums, and those two Mapex snares (specifically) will hang with or better drums that cost triple their price, easily. For common everyday "major brand" snares, these are the best two - I've ever owned...Best of luck to you, Joe!
 

DaveLemonds

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I have a custom built wood 13 x 5 snare that I have used in almost every session I do, and my go to metal is a standard black beauty.
 

JDA

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If I had to own a metal snare it would be a light one.
Dear JDA...

It's possible during those days that making quality "metal" shells was more difficult, perhaps. Also, making a wood snare matched the other drums, so
that could be why, too. (We've come quite a long way since then!) I love wood and metal snares for different reasons, but I find that wood snares sit into my (live) drum mix and blend a little better, but metal offers a little more volume and increased snare sensitivity. I'm sure there are plenty of other good reasons why some of the best (back then) stuck to wood too, but since we're on the subject of the best wood and metal snares...I'm going to say it's a perfect tie for each one of these...For Wood: Eames 9ply Birch 13x5.5" or a Mapex 8ply Maple / Walnut 14x5.5" Velvetone. These do it all in every volume and tuning range. For Metal: Oriollo 13x5" Steel or a Mapex 14x5.5" Blade. I LOVE my Eames and Oriollo for custom drums...However, for "off the shelf" ready, Mapex is not my favorite brand, but I've had about 35 different snare drums, and those two Mapex snares (specifically) will hang with or better drums that cost triple their price, easily. For common everyday "major brand" snares, these are the best two - I've ever owned...Best of luck to you, Joe!
I've owned two Supraphonics, 1 Premier 2000, an 80s roller Tama , 1 4X14 20s brass 6L, and currently a 66 Gretsch RB 5 cob- which I won't part with as it goes with a set.

If I was forced or wanted to play a metal drum it would be a light one. Comparable in weight to a wood Ludwig or wood Gretsch.

Otherwise I don't see it as compatible with the rest of the drum set. Or necessary.
The snare within the drum set to me is not "a separate" entity; only in that it has a strainer , butt and wires.
That alone is enough metal add on to make it "different" within the drum set.

Again unless it was very light; like a Prem 2000 6.5...or a Joyful Noise or...a Dunnett...the opposite of the internet/forums/rave over 20 and 40lb snares.
I don't want to be stuck in the snare drum..lol ..It's just a sound like - equal with- every other spot in the kit. don't want - don't need it to be such an outlier. Feel that misses the point of a drum-set being a single entity.

but thanks for the Dear JDA letter!!
ps; it may be the light ness that many like/endorse the Oriollo snares!
 
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Drumskillz

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As an engineer, I discovered long ago that the material used to manufacture drum shells, has very little to do with drum sound.
Hmmm. While I would agree that the differences between wood types can be subtle, there IS a difference. My Maple snares are on the brighter side. My birch snare brighter still. My mahogany snares are darker...very warm and mellow-ish. And as far as the difference between a wood snare and a metal snare, if you can't hear that then I question whether or not you should be an engineer.
 

Bri6366

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14" x 6" Tama Starclassic G Maple- A do it all, workhorse snare drum. You can dial it up and the rim shots will cause serious bodily harm. You can tune it down for a fat backbeat, but it still has plenty of power and projection.

14"x6.5" Yamaha Recording Custom Brass- Another well built drum with plenty of attitude, dynamics and a great tuning range.
 


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