4/2/87. Buddy Rich Passed away

Bluenote

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33 yrs ago today, the great one left, all the Best to the man.
Good thoughts.

Weird - in a way - that I have to include Buddy as a Top 5 source of inspiration for myself when I’m so far removed from that level of technical ability...right down to matched grip, overly dominant right hand, and rock’n’roll, lol.

But he certainly was.
 

Tilter

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I vividly remember coming home and my mom immediately telling me that he had passed. It was especially impactful because we had just seen his band play in our home town a few months prior.

I still have the newspaper clipping tucked away with his autograph in the MD tribute issue. I'm grateful that I was not only able to see him perform, but to also meet him and shake his hand.
 

wflkurt

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I feel fortunate that I saw Buddy in 1984 when I was 13. He played a local high school and somehow my completely non musical parents got me tickets. I'm wondering if my drum teacher suggested it. It was great but I wish I had been a little older to appreciate it what I was actually seeing. At almost 50 now I find myself watching BR videos almost daily. It's just mind blowing to me.
 

NobleCooleyNut

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I never got the opportunity to meet Buddy in person , even though I saw him twice live . I would have been to star struck to have gone up and talked to him back in those days . He was my biggest drum hero back in those days ( soon to have Danny Seraphine join him ). I vividly recall first seeing him around 1971 as a ten year old with my Dad . My Dad remarked about how fantastic Buddy’s left hand was . I could not respond as I was totally transfixed watching his every move .
My fondness for Slingerland Drums was due to Buddy and my first drum teacher .
 

bigbonzo

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Sorry gents, but I don't miss him. He was a real prick during a concert that I went to at Lakewood Civic Auditorium in 1976 when I was in high school. I left at intermission.
 
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CSR

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Sorry gents, but I don't miss him. He was a real prick during a concert that I went to at Lakewood Civic Auditorium in 1976 when I was in high school. I left at intermission.
I discovered in college that I could value and learn from someone I personally disliked. You have to separate the skills and talent from the personality. Many famous orchestral conductors were real pricks, but incredible talents.
 
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bigbonzo

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I discovered in college that I could value and learn from someone I personally disliked. You have to separate the skills and talent from the personality. Many famous orchestral conductors were real pricks, but incredible talents.
Nah. There are plenty of good drummers that are "nice guys" to learn from. But, thanks though.
 

hsosdrum

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You might want to read more about Buddy the man before dismissing him as simply an a$$hole. I've read glowing tributes from musicians who played in his bands where they talk about the many personal kindnesses Buddy did them (like the time he gave — not loaned — a sideman the down payment for their house). I met Buddy in 1967 when I was 15 (I'll relate the details in the future), but suffice it to say that Buddy was absolutely wonderful to me — meeting him was one of my life's most cherished memories

All this aside, if you choose not to listen to and learn from Buddy's playing, it's most definitely your loss.
 

hsosdrum

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I think it's funny when folks get angry because you don't like their favorite player.

When I saw him play, he was not a pleasant person.

Oh, and I didn't call him an a$$hole.

All the best.
I apologize for misquoting you — you called him a prick.

I wasn't reacting to your not liking him, I was suggesting that you should look at a larger sample size before making a judgment about who a person is. I'm sure you've had off-days where you acted badly towards others; it wouldn't be fair of them to judge you as a person only by your behavior on those occasions.

I was also reacting to your closing yourself off to an artist's work solely because you don't like who they were/are as a person. You'll miss out on the beauty and meaning of a great deal of the world's art if you insist on rejecting it outright by that standard. If an artist's work doesn't touch you, that's one thing — not all art will reach all people. But refusing to consider an artist's work because you don't like them as a person closes you off from a lot of art that could enrich your life, and in the case of drummers, a lot of music that could help you to grow as a musician.
 

bigbonzo

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I have heard plenty of Buddy Rich. I also read the biography written by his friend Mel Torme. Toward the end of the book Buddy even talks about how poorly he acted toward some people. Sorry, but I still don't like him. Apparently, I'm not alone in MY assessment of the man. You can feel anyway you want about him.
 

NobleCooleyNut

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I have heard more disparaging comments about Dave Weckl than I have heard about Buddy Rich
 

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