60's Trixon or Vox - whats the vibe like?

Paradiddle

DFO Veteran
Joined
Jul 28, 2006
Messages
2,649
Reaction score
378
I'm feeling the need to buy some cool vibey set in a funky wrap. I currently have a 40's Gretsch, 50's Gretsch, new Broadkaster, and a Q copper set (might be my favorite of the lot).

Anyway - I was thinking of a cool stencil kit but I got a line on a cool set of 60's Trixon and a set of Vox both (13, 16, 22). Both from the same seller. Both are affordable.

What's the deal with these kits? I've read some stuff on-line, even on here, but what are they like to play? They float heads okay? They have a cool vibe?

The same seller has an amazing sounding Delta Rogers 12, 20 Tower,with a 16 Holiday floor tom all matching wrap. I've had Rogers before, but never a tower. These things sound beefy.

Anyway - give me your thoughts on Trixon and Vox.
 

KCDrumDad

Very well Known Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
1,386
Reaction score
143
Location
Kansas City
I have had two Trixon sets. The shells are well made. Some of the hardware is a little fragile - the plastic parts. None of it is interchangeable with other manufacturers other than Sonor. Sparkles tend to fade and show old age spots, so finding a presentable set can be a challenge.
 

retrosonic

DFO Veteran
Joined
Mar 23, 2011
Messages
2,962
Reaction score
147
Location
NYC
I had a Trixon Telstar set.

Pros: the COOLEST looking set you will ever own
Cons: When a part breaks, youre in trouble. You cant just go down to GC or Sam Ash and get something that fits, you have to hope that someone on a drum forum has what you need....and you can bet it WILL be very expensive.
 

dboomer

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2011
Messages
707
Reaction score
74
Location
Visalia CA
Got my first kit back in the 60’s when Vox used to outfit our band. Never could tune them, but back then I really wasn't very good at tuning. Got the bug to get another kit a few years back thinking with modern heads and much better tuning skills I could get them to sound right. Well that didn’t work.

Coolest looking drums on the planet. Impossible to tune up to sound decent. Speedfire kick is the toughest. Conical drums pull the lugs funny and they hit the hoops of the heads so you sometimes have to file notches in the hoops to get them to work.

Do not remove the screws that hold the bass drums legs. You will strip out the threads.
 

Attachments

Paradiddle

DFO Veteran
Joined
Jul 28, 2006
Messages
2,649
Reaction score
378
The Trixon
kit I’m looking at is a Luxus. So shells are “normal”

How do they sound and feel compared to Gretsch or Ludwig?
 

drummerjohn333

DFO Veteran
Joined
Jul 23, 2011
Messages
2,557
Reaction score
155
Location
Michigan
If we're honest here - we would love looking at them and will look cool playing them - but really.......from an experiential point of few, they sound like a nightmare to own.

dboomer - is it possible that, like with most manufacturers, sometimes you run into poorly cut edges or shells that are not - true - and thus your tuning frustrations? I am one of those that says "cut away" when one is faced with a vintage drum that can't tune right and has edge issues. I don't care if that will make them 'unoriginal' - give them a change to really sing the way the designers intended - otherwise, it's just something to look at.
 

BennyK

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 6, 2008
Messages
14,183
Reaction score
1,153
These are impeccably made - odd sizes buyer may have to inve$t in metric heads -


Bob Coulthart ruled Ottawa's drumming community for decades - he actually was offered the drum seat in Emerson Lake and Palmer at one point early on , but turned it down . You can see the conical Trixons in this pic . Silver Croco wrap . He went to a complete double kit when they had the house gig at Chez Henri across the river in the late sixties . A buddy of mine has this kit , Bobby sadly left us not long ago .

 
Last edited:

Paradiddle

DFO Veteran
Joined
Jul 28, 2006
Messages
2,649
Reaction score
378
Sounds like the shells are great, the lugs are fine, the other hardware and plastic bits can be an issue. Parts are non-existent.

How do they sound?
 

edgyTimmy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
45
Reaction score
0
Location
Saint Paul, MN
I have a Telstar conical set - my dad bought them new & I am the 2nd owner. The bearing edges are not sharp at all. Not much sustain. I never had luck with thin heads, they sounded ringy & thin. Right now I'm using coated pinstripe tops/emperor bottoms and the toms have a nice vintage thud. Since I have owned the drums the bass spurs, floor tom legs, and tom mount have all stripped out. I did some minimally invasive surgery with some Gibraltar hardware and RIMS-style mounts to keep the set up and running.
--Tim
 

Paradiddle

DFO Veteran
Joined
Jul 28, 2006
Messages
2,649
Reaction score
378
I have a Telstar conical set - my dad bought them new & I am the 2nd owner. The bearing edges are not sharp at all. Not much sustain. I never had luck with thin heads, they sounded ringy & thin. Right now I'm using coated pinstripe tops/emperor bottoms and the toms have a nice vintage thud. Since I have owned the drums the bass spurs, floor tom legs, and tom mount have all stripped out. I did some minimally invasive surgery with some Gibraltar hardware and RIMS-style mounts to keep the set up and running.
--Tim
Thanks.
 

D. B. Cooper

Very well Known Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2009
Messages
1,046
Reaction score
84
I have a Telstar conical set - my dad bought them new & I am the 2nd owner. The bearing edges are not sharp at all. Not much sustain. I never had luck with thin heads, they sounded ringy & thin. Right now I'm using coated pinstripe tops/emperor bottoms and the toms have a nice vintage thud. Since I have owned the drums the bass spurs, floor tom legs, and tom mount have all stripped out. I did some minimally invasive surgery with some Gibraltar hardware and RIMS-style mounts to keep the set up and running.
--Tim
You make them sound like a joy to own!
 

Patrick

DFO Veteran
Joined
Oct 17, 2005
Messages
2,441
Reaction score
43
I have a set of Luxus set up in one of my regular rehearsal spaces. Just the Toms and kick, no Trixon snare. I like their sound.Nice open sound with good definition and plenty of frequency to play with or muffle per your tastes. To my ears they don't sound like my Gretsch or Ludwig kits. Hard to think of the best comparison. Nice playin and sounding drums in their own way.
 

Paradiddle

DFO Veteran
Joined
Jul 28, 2006
Messages
2,649
Reaction score
378
I have a set of Luxus set up in one of my regular rehearsal spaces. Just the Toms and kick, no Trixon snare. I like their sound.Nice open sound with good definition and plenty of frequency to play with or muffle per your tastes. To my ears they don't sound like my Gretsch or Ludwig kits. Hard to think of the best comparison. Nice playin and sounding drums in their own way.
Thanks - this is what I was looking for.

Thanks,

Jeff
 

D. B. Cooper

Very well Known Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2009
Messages
1,046
Reaction score
84
A random thought; but with the precarious nature of those makers listed, why not go a slightly different route and buy a set of Sonor teardrops or premier drums? 60's tubs?
Something Italian also comes to mind...
 

SwivoNut

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2005
Messages
3,991
Reaction score
143
Location
Mason, MI
The music store where I taught drum lessons back in the 60 was a Trixon dealer. The store help didn't know how to set them up correctly so I took it upon myself to set up each kit when it came in so it wouldn't look dorky on the sales floor. Almost every set had plastic lug spacers and muffler knobs that were broken during shipment. Even back then parts were impossible to get and the owner had to discount the sets in order to sell them. The bass drums and toms were easy to tune and sounded OK. The snare drums, on the other hand, were beastly and I could never tune one to my complete satisfaction.
 

edgyTimmy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
45
Reaction score
0
Location
Saint Paul, MN
The music store where I taught drum lessons back in the 60 was a Trixon dealer. The store help didn't know how to set them up correctly so I took it upon myself to set up each kit when it came in so it wouldn't look dorky on the sales floor. Almost every set had plastic lug spacers and muffler knobs that were broken during shipment. Even back then parts were impossible to get and the owner had to discount the sets in order to sell them. The bass drums and toms were easy to tune and sounded OK. The snare drums, on the other hand, were beastly and I could never tune one to my complete satisfaction.
My dad, the original owner of my Trixons, shares your assessment of the Trixon snare drums. He never liked the sound so he traded his in for a 60s Ludwig Super Sensitive. Doubtless a better sounding drum but I sure would have liked to get the matching snare. Roger - I see you're in Wisconsin - did you by chance work at Jim Laabs music? That's where my father purchased his set in the '60s.
 

trixonian

DFO Master
Joined
Feb 1, 2006
Messages
3,563
Reaction score
50
Location
Indiana
The Luxus shells are well made and avoid some of the problems inherent with the conical shells. They are comparable to Sonor phonic shells. As stated, the mounting hardware is the weak link. If they are the later lugs with plastic spacers, any cracked spacers should only be a cosmetic issue. If the kit has the early teardrop lugs, then look out for metric sizes as noted by BennyK.

Vox are the same drums; Trixon marketed under that name in the US toward the end. The only difference I know of is the badges and shape of the BD tuning rods. Vox should be from 70's era with rectangular lugs and should pose no issues with metric sizes.

What are the colors?
 

Latest posts



Top