90's Yamaha RC Floor Tom Bracket failure

kdgrissom

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This has happen to us many times and I wonder if anybody else has had the same issue. The Orchestra owns a mid- 90's era Yamaha Recording Custom drum set that gets set up and torn down repeatedly during the season. It is well cared for and is kept in padded Enduro cases when not in use.
We have had reoccurring issues concerning the original (and subsequent) wing nuts stripping on the steel eyebolt inside the FT bracket (basically, not holding the floortom legs firmly in place) and sometimes leading to a "situation" in a concert. I am of the opinion that this beautifully crafted piece is made of pot metal. Has anyone else dealt with this issue and has Yamaha solved this problem in the last twenty+ years? ( Sorry, but I really don't keep up with current Yamaha trends).
 

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Back in the mid to late 1980's I had issues with the triple tom holder blowing out where the Wing screws applied pressure. They are made of pot metal. I never had issues with the floor tom mounts but I sold the kit after 4 years.
 

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This has happen to us many times and I wonder if anybody else has had the same issue. The Orchestra owns a mid- 90's era Yamaha Recording Custom drum set that gets set up and torn down repeatedly during the season. It is well cared for and is kept in padded Enduro cases when not in use.
We have had reoccurring issues concerning the original (and subsequent) wing nuts stripping on the steel eyebolt inside the FT bracket (basically, not holding the floortom legs firmly in place) and sometimes leading to a "situation" in a concert. I am of the opinion that this beautifully crafted piece is made of pot metal. Has anyone else dealt with this issue and has Yamaha solved this problem in the last twenty+ years? ( Sorry, but I really don't keep up with current Yamaha trends).
Is this kit equipped with the YESS floor tom leg mounts, or the non-YESS mounts? My YESS-equipped RÇ floor tom mounts can sometimes be a little finicky, but they've never dumped themselves and led to any real "situations" during a gig.
 

kdgrissom

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Is this kit equipped with the YESS floor tom leg mounts, or the non-YESS mounts? My YESS-equipped RÇ floor tom mounts can sometimes be a little finicky, but they've never dumped themselves and led to any real "situations" during a gig.
This. I was told by our stagehands that the interior eyebolts are metric and they will find a Metric Wingnut made of steel to solve the problem.
1607914658327.png
 

ARGuy

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Every new Yamaha wing nut I've seen has been steel. Actually, I don't think I've ever seen a wing nut from any manufacturer that wasn't steel?
 

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The newer bracket has the bolt receiver threaded on the side (probably just to reduce the overall footprint):


I have no experience with the older bracket, so I wouldn't have a clue if the new one has solved your or any other issues. I haven't had any issues with mine (newer bracket).

The wing bolt is M8, and Yamaha's part number for it is PWB8A. If you've got a Yamaha cymbal stand or triple tom holder, they use the same M8 wing bolts, so you can check to see if they fit.
 

kdgrissom

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This is the culprit. Open only on one side. Made from a "high quality metal alloy" according to sales literature.



1607958369252.png
 

Kevinpursuit

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Probably aluminum. Being a Yamaha owner, never experienced a holder or hardware failure.
The hardware seems to have plenty of grip without over tightening. The knurling of the tom legs seems to keep anything from slipping. Im perplexed as to why you are experiencing this failure.
 
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kdgrissom

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Im perplexed as to why you are experiencing this failure.
Because the the receiving eyebolt in the bracket (which pulls against the knurled leg to keep in place) is steel and the wingnut is either pot metal (or Aluminum) and therefore it eventually strips. This is the second time in 20+ years this has happened and we replaced all three bracket assemblies the last time (around 2008).This kit is from the 90's and when used during a regular work week it gets set-up and dismantled at least four times. Many times the stagehands will set-up the kit especially when a guest artist brings their own drummer.
 

JDA

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set that gets set up and torn down repeatedly during the season
Im perplexed as to why you are experiencing this failure.
I'll wager a reason why.
When you have multiple people turning the screw it weakens.
If it's you or me- One guy- who touches any item--- anything can last 70 years.
The item get used to "you" and remains fairly stable.
When you have multiple people using different weight and pressures on an item (any item) it's fail rate will increase
the solution in that case is to have something near indestructible
Or have on-hand a 1/2 dozen stock of the brackets in the maintenance drawer..
 
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Geardaddy

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So basically your complaint is that a $7 wing nut has failed after being set up and torn down roughly 2000+ times (according to your description) since 2008. And since you are not the only person doing this, you have no way of knowing what was done to the wing nuts when other people took care of the setup. If this were in an industrial application, I would say you need a preventative maintenance program in place that replaces the wing nuts with new ones every 5 years to prevent failures. I'm not trying to make light about what happened, but I'm guessing that with as many setup and teardown cycles the wing nuts and brackets have experienced over the last 12 years, there was probably significant metal fatigue involved and not necessarily quality issues. I see this type of thing where I work which is why we try to replace parts like this well before they fail.
 

jaymandude

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So basically your complaint is that a $7 wing nut has failed after being set up and torn down roughly 2000+ times (according to your description) since 2008. And since you are not the only person doing this, you have no way of knowing what was done to the wing nuts when other people took care of the setup. If this were in an industrial application, I would say you need a preventative maintenance program in place that replaces the wing nuts with new ones every 5 years to prevent failures. I'm not trying to make light about what happened, but I'm guessing that with as many setup and teardown cycles the wing nuts and brackets have experienced over the last 12 years, there was probably significant metal fatigue involved and not necessarily quality issues. I see this type of thing where I work which is why we try to replace parts like this well before they fail.
I have a good friend who works at a major backline company. At some point everything by every drum manufacturer fails. “Shrug “ that’s just how it goes
 

JDA

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So basically your complaint is that a $7 wing nut has failed after being set up and torn down roughly 2000+ times (according to your description) since 2008. And since you are not the only person doing this, you have no way of knowing what was done to the wing nuts when other people took care of the setup. If this were in an industrial application, I would say you need a preventative maintenance program in place that replaces the wing nuts with new ones every 5 years to prevent failures. I'm not trying to make light about what happened, but I'm guessing that with as many setup and teardown cycles the wing nuts and brackets have experienced over the last 12 years, there was probably significant metal fatigue involved and not necessarily quality issues. I see this type of thing where I work which is why we try to replace parts like this well before they fail.
My only concern there would be---->


is this part still available? (I dunno not a Yamaha fella,,)
I'd order 4 or 5, 2 or 3, complete assembly's yesterday.

Someone get Kdgriss the part number
 

kdgrissom

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Thanks for all the input guys! I agree wholeheartedly that routine replacement maintenance has been lacking. As much of a stickler I am for OEM parts, our head stagehand is going to source some steel wingnuts this week and we'll see if we can put this issue to rest.
 


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