A question about apple wood...

jaisonwhitekar

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Hey all, newbie here. I happen to work at an apple orchard and we just removed 37 trees. My boss is a drummer too, so I would love to figure out how to use some of his old wood and use it to make a stave snare drum for him, as well as one for me. Apple wood is super hard and I'll bet that thing would sound like a cannon! Is there a sure way to make sure the log I take dries properly so I can eventually cut staves out of it?UC browser SHAREit MX player
 
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JazzDrumGuy

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They don't make good snares because the factory can only make an apple (snare) a day.....
Fuji-t about it. Ask Granny Smith. If you make one for me, I will throw you a gala.
You aren't in Hawaii working at a pine-apple farm, are you?

There actually is such thing as a "Jazz" apple variety....now that's what I'm talking about!
 

squidart

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They don't make good snares because the factory can only make an apple (snare) a day.....
Fuji-t about it. Ask Granny Smith. If you make one for me, I will throw you a gala.
You aren't in Hawaii working at a pine-apple farm, are you?

There actually is such thing as a "Jazz" apple variety....now that's what I'm talking about!
No matter how you slice it there's something a-peel-ing about this rant. But seedy as it may be, this one post won't spoil the whole bunch. My girlfriend read it and she was be-cider self.
 

lossforgain

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I am always intrigued by drums made of woods that one doesn't see often. That apple shell above looks great! If you have the skills to build one I'd love to see it happen.
 

crocoyes2

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I would bring in professional appraiser for the land, buildings and equipment. The trees would have to be valued by age and productivity, and then the actual business operations should be looked at from the viewpoint of having to buy the land and interest on the capital expenses. If the farm has been in the family for a generation or more, the land is probably paid for.
 

Barden

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Hey all, newbie here. I happen to work at an apple orchard and we just removed 37 trees. My boss is a drummer too, so I would love to figure out how to use some of his old wood and use it to make a stave snare drum for him, as well as one for me. Apple wood is super hard and I'll bet that thing would sound like a cannon! Is there a sure way to make sure the log I take dries properly so I can eventually cut staves out of it?UC browser SHAREit MX player
How are you planning on cutting the staves?

If you are going to mill the log into planks you can do that before the log dries, then you air dry the planks. To prevent/reduce checking on the ends of the boards you can buy a green wood sealer and paint it on the endgrain.

The tension in the log that causes cracking during the drying process comes from the density difference between the center of the log and the edge. This causes those regions to shrink at different rates. Once milled into boards an individual board will have much less of a span in densities and be able to warp instead of crack. As long as you mill your boards with some waste to account for warping you'll be good to go.

If you can't commit to a board cut list you can quarter the log, seal the ends and still relieve lots of future drying stress.

It will probably take 1 year for the wood to dry enough for stave work (assumptions on the board sizes)
 

Bongo Brad

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I have to assume we don't see many apple wood drums, or anything else, because the trees are small. It limits the size of boards available. But for a stave drum, one apple tree might do it.
 

ARGuy

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I would bring in professional appraiser for the land, buildings and equipment. The trees would have to be valued by age and productivity, and then the actual business operations should be looked at from the viewpoint of having to buy the land and interest on the capital expenses. If the farm has been in the family for a generation or more, the land is probably paid for.
???
 

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