Adventures in dent removal...

Bijan

DFO Veteran
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
2,130
Reaction score
39
Location
Houston TX
Got in a 20's 6x14 Leedy Black Elite last month. The shell had a noticable push-in behind the throwoff. This isn't something to be left alone in my opinion. Here's the dent:



I decided it was high time to make a tool of sorts to make this kind of thing more controllable. We have a piece of really nice mahogany here, so I cut off a piece that would fit between the lug backing plates. Then I used a 14" cymbal to mark the cut on the wood. It was within 1/64" of the shell's diameter, so it was close enough. I marked both pieces of the tool with an X on the same side, so it would mate up correctly when setting up. Here's the "tool":



I pulled the heads off. I used a piece of scrap cloth between the outside of the shell and the outer wood to protect the finish. I used a large clamp to tighten the pieces together. I broke out ye olde channel-locks to get some extra gusto in the clamping. I tightened the clamp pretty much as tight as I could:



I'd say I got the dent at least 90% gone- the pic makes it look worse than it is. Here are the results:



Here's the area with the drum fully assembled:



The batter hoop had a nice size dent in the top area, and I did the same thing to get it 95% gone, too.
 

poot

Penncrest Endorser
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
5,835
Reaction score
44
Location
Odebolt
Bijan,

Excellent idea. Great results! Did you cut the pattern with a bandsaw?
 

Bijan

DFO Veteran
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
2,130
Reaction score
39
Location
Houston TX
Poot- thanks! Ah, yes, bandsaw, and then I sanded the arc to smooth out the curve.
 

Rich K.

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
10,746
Reaction score
592
Location
Savannah, GA
Great job...the Leedy white elite I just got in has that same indentation slightly...
You do, however, lose a few points because of those white plastic washers...
 

Bijan

DFO Veteran
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
2,130
Reaction score
39
Location
Houston TX
Rich K. said:
You do, however, lose a few points because of those white plastic washers...


Yep- the hoops are pretty chewed up from the rods, though, so I did what had to be done!
 

mwb5271

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2008
Messages
385
Reaction score
0
Location
Grand Rapids, MI
Great job and excellent results! For those of us that are not as technically inclined most auto body shops are getting very good at repairing hail damage on cars. The same tools and techniques should work on metal shell drums? Just an idea.
 

lucky

Very well Known Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
753
Reaction score
1
Location
Grass Valley, CA
Nice... I made the same 'tool' and used it on several drums. I actually finished the job by gently tapping the remaining dent using the curve as a anvil. Worked great.
 

BennyK

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 6, 2008
Messages
14,036
Reaction score
1,029
Very clever Bijan. Seems to have worked out nicely. I bought an antique shoemakers anvil at a yard sale last summer and its handy for this kind of proceedure as well. Some bicycle seats are a good backing when perforation is a risk. BennyK.
 

DanC

"Get in, sit down, shut up, hold on"
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
13,643
Reaction score
509
Location
Somewhere in Florida, behind a Rogers kit
lucky said:
Nice... I made the same 'tool' and used it on several drums. I actually finished the job by gently tapping the remaining dent using the curve as a anvil. Worked great.


This is what I have found as well. Just clamping the shell with the anvil inside will not get the dents completely out, this is because of the 'snap back' nature of the metal. Some tapping on the problem areas using the wooden anvil or a small wooden drift (with a rubber mallet) will really minimize any evidence of the dents. Go slowly and check the work constantly and the results will be there.
 

Latest posts



Top