Advice on cracked ride.

Spooky

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Hi, a while back I noticed a slight sizzle, but couldn’t find anything but the other day I found it...
Cracked right on the edge of the bell.
It’s about 2’ long..
Would it fix it if I got a hole cut around it, or drilled each end?
Or
Should I leave it alone?
It’s a ride, so doesn’t get too much action..
Thanks, Spooky.
 

dtk

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IMO...cut it out. the idea with drilling holes at either end is that its supposed to stop the crack but...it also assumes that where you see the crack end is the actual end and that you don't stress it more drilling.

If you're going to cut it out...you might want to hire someone or...acquire a Dremel. I recently did a search on Amazon (US) and they suggested another device just like it for half the cost. If you do get a Dremel or like device message me or start a post so I/we can give you some tips to keep you and the cymbal safe.

Based on what I know about you...getting a Dremel might be a good investment because I suspect like most of us your hooked on drums for life....and over time you might pick up some 'crackers' for cheap and fix 'em up.

Also...how big a ride is it...and how long is the crack?

and finally...do you know why it cracked (so you can prevent it from happening again)?
 

JazzDrumGuy

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I have a Dremel but never taken it to a cymbal...yet. I've drilled holes with no issues - easy to do (put a flashlight under the cymbal), mark both edges, and drill away. Never had a crack go past the drilling holes......plus, you've got rivet holes, too!

Cutting out a part of a cymbal may affect its sound.....and is a "hole" lot messier!
 

equipmentdork

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I've been using a ride cymbal with several cracks in it for years now. It's a Sabian AA Raw Bell Dry Ride that someone dropped on a curb. It still sounds good enough to record with! So, if the sound isn't driving you crazy, an option is to.....do nothing. That might be the easiest thing to do!


Dan
 

drummerjohn333

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Yeah - cut it out. It might change the sound of the cymbal a bit, but it will not change it so much to ruin it.

BTW - you watch Lance Campeau on Youtube? The Cymbal Project. Check it out - and you will not be intimidated at all to cut it out.

Thread here for advice is always good too - gets us sharing and creates good resource for future research.

and finally.....have fun recording!
 

mlayton

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I'd take a magnifying glass and identify the ends of the crack. Mark them with a Sharpie. Continue playing the cymbal if the sound suits you. Check the marks from time to time and make sure the crack is not spreading. If it is, then I would go with one of the above recommendations.
 

JazzDrumGuy

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If you choose to cut it out, I'd simply get a small tip and hollow it out versus cutting a large piece out. I'd try to go as small as possible to make a gap like 1/8" wide.......like the center section here (but even smaller)......and I would not do large holes on the edges.

Cut cymbal.jpg
 

JDA

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It’s a ride, so doesn’t get too much action..
Got some action that day..

Drill ends to arrest crack (will still rattle)
3/32nd drill bit (for small hole)
5/32nd drill bit (if you may want to add rivets (to maybe cover up) the rattle..
Cobalt/hardened steel/ bit.

That type usually happens or can happen from "shock against the stem"
(being pushed against an immovable (the stem) object) Crack shows up (remotely else where) like there..
Couple other ways it could happen too but rather not get into details..)
Usually a 'remote' shock crack.

there's a fella that fuses them back together (In the US)
may be one in UK also.
Idea: Ask or maybe show to Collingwood Cymbals for an assist on how to proceed
https://www.collingwoodcymbals.com/
 
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Tama CW

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I like what MLayton said. Also mark the crack with a black felt tip marker and play the opposite side. With a ride that is not crashed hard, I doubt the crack continues to grow.
 

Spooky

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IMO...cut it out. the idea with drilling holes at either end is that its supposed to stop the crack but...it also assumes that where you see the crack end is the actual end and that you don't stress it more drilling.

If you're going to cut it out...you might want to hire someone or...acquire a Dremel. I recently did a search on Amazon (US) and they suggested another device just like it for half the cost. If you do get a Dremel or like device message me or start a post so I/we can give you some tips to keep you and the cymbal safe.

Based on what I know about you...getting a Dremel might be a good investment because I suspect like most of us your hooked on drums for life....and over time you might pick up some 'crackers' for cheap and fix 'em up.

Also...how big a ride is it...and how long is the crack?

and finally...do you know why it cracked (so you can prevent it from happening again)?
It’s a 24”
Can’t rule out it was damaged when we’ve been gigging, during load in/ out...didn’t think I hit hard enough to do something like this, on a ride.
Thanks for the advice
Spooky
 

Spooky

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I've been using a ride cymbal with several cracks in it for years now. It's a Sabian AA Raw Bell Dry Ride that someone dropped on a curb. It still sounds good enough to record with! So, if the sound isn't driving you crazy, an option is to.....do nothing. That might be the easiest thing to do!


Dan
Hi yeah this was a gift from someone, came to me second hand but in great condition.
It’s a sabian.
Spooky
 

Cliff DeArment

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Here's an unusual solution. (Some hate the idea, but it works.) A good super glue. That's right… Super glue (Cyanoacrylate, not the gel type, usual Elmer's). You have to be careful with it, but it can make the sizzle shut up. I've used this stuff through the years. It only goes for a while, but what the hey, you don't have to drill it yet. One lasted about 3 years. It will seep down into the bronze crystals and adhere them together. Here's how to do it… Put the cymbal upside down. Open the super glue and poke a pin hole, as small as you can, much like a syringe. Don't touch it with your hands. Have to do this fast now. Follow the crack, then crash it hard a few times. You may see this seeping out from the other side. If not, do the other side too. Let it sit for a few hours, then see how it sounds. It usually works. Otherwise, live it be, or drill.
 

bubo

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I also heard about some people having their cracked cymbals Laser-Welded. -At least the sizzle-effect wil be gone.
Although every kind of welding will imply lots of energy, Laser-Welding can be adjusted much tighter than other (welding) methods.
You would still face some brittleness in the welded area but since you say you don´t hit this very cymbal very hard it shouldn´t be a big issue;
-would be a different story on a crash because you naturally face much more vibration (higher peaks) on those.
Pending on what your cymbal is worth to you you should give it a try, while finding someone to do the job for a reasonable price would be not easy.

Good Luck on this one.
 

rock roll

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There's also a product called "jb weld".
Same idea as cliff deArment . It was recommended to me for one of my cymbals but. Never got around to trying it. I was told to drill holes at end of cracks then fill with "jb weld" .
Great thread,
Lots of good Idea's here .
Never heard of the laser weld idea, I'll read about it.
 

GeeDeeEmm

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There's also a product called "jb weld".
Same idea as cliff deArment . It was recommended to me for one of my cymbals but. Never got around to trying it. I was told to drill holes at end of cracks then fill with "jb weld" .
Great thread,
Lots of good Idea's here .
Never heard of the laser weld idea, I'll read about it.
I like your super glue suggestion, and it might work for a while. At least stop the rattle.

I have many doubts about JB Weld, but who knows? (I've used JB Weld a lot over the years, and it's a great product when used as directed. But this is not one I'd have confidence in. I've been wrong many times before.)

The welding idea sounds very workable, though, and is the way I would go. The pure bronze rod used in whatever welding method chosen (TIG with a heat shield?) should close the crack permanently. And bronze rod is not expensive. And neither would be a qualified welder for such a small job like this. Probably less than $25. (And, yes, the cymbal will be more brittle in the welding area, but it will still be better than a widening crack.)

GeeDeeEmm
 

Spooky

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My uncle can weld, I’m going to ask him when I’m next over, he did cut my old hats when the top one went, like a little bite out of it! Made them fast and I still have them :)
Thanks everyone
Spooky
 

bubo

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My uncle can weld, I’m going to ask him when I’m next over, he did cut my old hats when the top one went, like a little bite out of it! Made them fast and I still have them :)
Thanks everyone
Spooky
You respectively your uncle :cool: should be very carefull what welding method to choose!

I mentioned LASER-WELDING for a reason, because you can fine adjust the energy and also can focus on the area very tight.
If you don´t have the equipment available don´t get your hands on the cymbal.
I tryed welding a cracked china years ago with the TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) method and the bronze just melted away, like i could die cast anything out of the material then...

If you cannot find a Laser-Guy, soldering would be a safer method as homework. But again could do more damage than good if you don´t have a "feel" for the melting point.
 
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