Alesis Turbo Mesh Electronic Drum Set - opinions? I want simple small easy-to-store electronic kit now that I live in an apt

richardh253

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Newbie to electronic after moving to an apt. Looking for a basic tutorial w/out taking up too much of your time.

I am looking for a small, easy to fold-up/set-up kit I can atore/play in the back of a large walk-in closet (carpeted, clothing hanging, nicely muffled). I would be playing a few times a week max. Daylight hours. Needs not to bother the downstairs neighbors. (We're top floor, end, so that's the only common surface.) Don't want to spend a lot.

Your Opinions about the Alesis Turbo Mesh? Sweetwater offering at $299. Welcome other suggestions.

In particular, I see an advantage/disadvantage to the pad-less BD pedal: my son once had a bigger electronic kit and when the beater hit the bass pad, still quite a "whack" we heard downstairs, whereas this would be silent. But what's it like playing a pad-less pedal?

Same w/hi-hat - advantage here is I do not have to drag my '66 Rogers swan-leg high hat out when I feel like playing. Or buy a kit with 2 hi-hat cymbal pads. What's the ledal action like?

The online reviews seem decent. After 55 years of playing acoustic sets and having sold off all but one (I can visit it but not play it here in the apt, but here's the photo anyway ) , I'm not much worried about how many kit-sounds are programmed, do-dads, etc., as long as a basic 60s sound is there. And I can plug in my iPod and play along to anything I choose.

This review https://drummingreview.com/alesis-turbo-mesh-review/ mentions adding digital sound libraries - can someone give me a quick practical translation of that?

Thanks to forum friends, especially those who know how hard it is to give up the acoustic kit when you're old enough to leave house-owning behind and move into an apartment.

Stay safe & well, everyone. - Richard

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cochlea

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Digital Sound Libraries means that you can connect the module to your computer using MIDI or USB. This would allow you to access additional (better) sounds but you would need to invest in drum software such as EZ Drummer or Addictive Drums to take advantage of this feature.

I have no experience with this particular e-kit but after playing e-kits exclusively for 30+ years, I can confidently say that the phrase "you get what you pay for" is quite accurate in the world of e-drums. At $299, this kit is one of the least expensive on the market today. Hopefully, it'll suit your needs at an affordable price. I would expect this price to translate into cheap quality, and would be leery of components holding up over time. Alesis has been in the e-drum market for many years but the quality of some of their products has been suspect. Personally, I would save a little more and look for a used Roland or Yamaha kit.
 

richardh253

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Digital Sound Libraries means that you can connect the module to your computer using MIDI or USB. This would allow you to access additional (better) sounds but you would need to invest in drum software such as EZ Drummer or Addictive Drums to take advantage of this feature.

I have no experience with this particular e-kit but after playing e-kits exclusively for 30+ years, I can confidently say that the phrase "you get what you pay for" is quite accurate in the world of e-drums. At $299, this kit is one of the least expensive on the market today. Hopefully, it'll suit your needs at an affordable price. I would expect this price to translate into cheap quality, and would be leery of components holding up over time. Alesis has been in the e-drum market for many years but the quality of some of their products has been suspect. Personally, I would save a little more and look for a used Roland or Yamaha kit.
Thanks for the helpful insights. Will keep looking and see what turns up!
 

cochlea

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By the way, I really like your acoustic kit. Having gone back to playing a similar Ludwig kit after all of these years playing an e-kit was a big adjustment. I think you might find it strange going from a traditional acoustic kit to one with a beaterless bass pedal and non-traditional hi-hat. To me, the biggest difference was in the responsiveness of the e-cymbal pads. I had a fairly decent Roland kit but the cymbals didn't have the same degree of responsiveness as an acoustic cymbal, especially when triggering the bell.
 

richardh253

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By the way, I really like your acoustic kit. Having gone back to playing a similar Ludwig kit after all of these years playing an e-kit was a big adjustment. I think you might find it strange going from a traditional acoustic kit to one with a beaterless bass pedal and non-traditional hi-hat. To me, the biggest difference was in the responsiveness of the e-cymbal pads. I had a fairly decent Roland kit but the cymbals didn't have the same degree of responsiveness as an acoustic cymbal, especially when triggering the bell.
thanks a story to every kit....I started selling off my collection two years ago seeing downsizing coming. I always figured the one kit I’d keep was a 66 Ludwig WMP 22-16-13-matching jazz fest. Then in August Steve Maxwell listed this BDP Ludwig 66 in 20-12-16,Plus matching jazz fest snare. The exact date, color, brand and sizes of my first kit when I was 13. I bought it, thinking I might as well wrap up my drum life with the identical kit to the one I started with (long gone of course).

got the kit from Steve, vvgc, had Jack Lawton clean up the bearing edges on the toms. But I always wanted a 14 x 14 to have a downbeat setup. You know how hard it is to find a 14 x 14, right? Add in same year, color, no fade....and the few around if you could find one, $800-1000. Not much hope.

so I get to the Delaware drum show last Feb to try and sell a few more kits and snares. And there’s a guy with a 14x14 63 Ludwig in BDP and in vvgc. $425. Wow.

there is a guy on reverb or eBay now selling a 66 4x14 Ludwig BDP snare for $1000, so if I really wanted the full catalog downbeat kit I’d go for it, but I’m ok with the jazz fest in 5.5x14 in BDP.

so now I’ve only got this one kit that matches my 1966 kit plus the 14x14, all in cases in the closet for now, but it closes the circle for me. Never letting that kit go, even if all I get to do in an apartment is look at it :)

thanks!
 

Drm1979

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Listen to kit examples on YouTube. One thing I dont like about the low end alesis kits is the hihat. It's way harsh and cuts through over everything else almost drowning out all the other drums. On the flip side I have a simmons sd350 and the hihat sounds on this one are on the quiet side. Of course if you intend to use a vst to trigger other sounds then it wouldn't be that big of a deal. I have heard that the alesis holds up better. I'm overall happy with my little simmons as I just use it as a practice kit with headphones. But time will tell on the durability as I've only had it a couple of months.
 

Drm1979

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Thanks for the hi hat heads up
No problem. In the review video I saw it also mentioned the cymbals themselves had a very thin layer of rubber over the plastic making them not quite as fun to play as they were very loud with the stick hitting against them.
 
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