Am I The Only One Who Doesn't Like My Craviotto Snare?

richardh253

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I had a Craviotto snare for a few weeks (Maxwell Drums had a one-off that was in the old Ludwig 1920s Stipple Finish) but it did not do much for me in relationship to the cost - I think I fell for the reputation and Stipple wrap. Maxwell kindly took it back on trade towards a kit. Did not miss it.

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jaymandude

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for the record.. I have 3, 2 of which are usually in rotation and sound fantastic. If you don't like it that's fine.. But a lot of people do. I rarely if ever play a ply snare drum..
 

RIDDIM

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Its a formed chunk of wood from the same trees other drums are made from.

Craviotto does not grow some unique breed of trees.

You are paying for excellent craftsmanship and marketing.

That drum will please the taste of only a certain individual.

A good drummer with know-how can make any well made snare sound great. It's not the drum. Marketing would have us believe it is the drum.
- There is much to be said for great musicians making given instruments sound good. That said, if the drum has edges that aren't right, improperly cut snare beds, or warped hoops are warped, clearly, you aren't getting what you paid for. With these conditions, a given drum is not going to sound as good as it could. That's not marketing, that's physics.
 

vinnyrac63

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I've never gotten those drums-snares or kits. Never played a single one I liked, certainly none to justify the price, and the idea of slapping a trick strainer or some other after market gizmo on a $2000 plut drum is beyond ludicrous. Hype and Hysteria. I've paid big bucks for high end kits in my life, but proudly I can say I've never been duped into buying a Crapiotto.
 

Genr

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I've never gotten those drums-snares or kits. Never played a single one I liked, certainly none to justify the price, and the idea of slapping a trick strainer or some other after market gizmo on a $2000 plut drum is beyond ludicrous. Hype and Hysteria. I've paid big bucks for high end kits in my life, but proudly I can say I've never been duped into buying a Crapiotto.
Opinions vary.
 

drumnhands

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I don't know, but it seems to me that once you drill all the holes and mount ten of those lugs and the snare strainer and butt, you've negated a lot of the benefits of a solid steam bent, 5.5x14 shell. There's not very much maple left that isn't covered up with a piece of metal.
 

Rhyma Hop

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Most of the Crav Snares I hear on Memphis Drum Shop or Maxwell Drums always sound a cut above the majority of ply snares... I definitely hear something great there.
 

JDA

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They have a single knock like a woodblock one guy told me.
 

drummer5359

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I wrote a shorter response on this thread a while back. (Response #88.) Tonight I couldn't sleep and thought that I'd dig in and go more in depth, since this thread popped up again. I'm a bit of a geek regarding single ply maple snare drums. Don't get me wrong, I like multi-ply drums as well and own various multi-ply snares from Gretsch, Slingerland, Ludwig and DW. They have their place for sure, but there is just something about a single ply solid maple snare drum...

My apologies for being long winded. (Yet again.)

Single ply maple snare drums sound very different than ply drums to my ears, and I happen to like the difference. And although I like how they sound from behind the kit, they really shine from out front. Over the years I've had drummers come up to me and ask about "the killer" snare, it is usually one of my single ply maple snares.

I have a decent selection of single ply maple snares from various manufacturers, in several different depths, with a variety of bearing edges and different hoops. I've bought all of these different snare drums in my quest to learn all that I can about single ply maple snare drums. I have my own opinions, a lot of them. These are just opinions, and as always, your mileage may vary.

My current lineup includes...

Three Slingerland snares from the late fifties, early sixties. A Radio King, a Super Radio King (with the "Super" clamshell strainer), and a single ply Artist. All three of them have a slightly different personality from each other, and they don't really sound like any of my other single ply maple snares either. I've been using my Super Radio King for rehearsal with my band since I got it this past October. The band is in love with this drum, and doesn't want me to switch it out.

A 1990s Nashville era Slingerland Super Radio King. In this case, "Super" denoted that it is fitted with die cast hoops. Beautifully made, sounds great. It's personality is more similar to my Noble & Cooley than my vintage Slingerlands.

A 7" deep Noble & Cooley Solid Shell Maple made in 1988, fitted with die cast hoops. A GREAT sounding snare, one of my favorites.

A 2003 DW/Craviotto flamed maple.

A 2006 DW/Craviotto Broken Glass Finishply to match my kit. Redundant? Yes, but it was a good price, matched my kit and allowed me to see if the Finishply wrap had a big effect on the tone. (My opinion is that the difference is very little.) The shell is not signed, but it does have the diamond shaped Craviotto "brand" inside the shell.

A 2004 DW Solid Shell maple, not sourced from Craviotto. (Vaughncraft?) At one point I owned two of these that were identical. For grins I kept one stock, and tried all sorts of different heads and snare wires on the other. After I was done experimenting, I sold one off. A very cool snare, and these often pop up for a good price. I recommend them as a great solid maple snare to see if you like solid maple snares. It sounds closest to my DW/Craviottos, but still slightly different.

A 2009 DW Super Solid. I ordered this the day that they announced it. They offered it 3/8", 1/2", or 3/4"
thick. I went with the the 3/4" thick version out of curiosity. If any snare drum deserves the "wood block" description, it might be this one. On the plus side the rim shot IS like a gun shot. Not versatile, but fun if only to scare the Marshall amp wielding lead guitarist (and everyone else) on occasion. Seriously though, it works great on outdoor stages playing rock.

A 2019 DW Supersonic. This combines the 3/8" thick Super Solid shell with the Rogers like snare bridge of their True-Sonic snare. Really a unique combination, and a drum that could possibly be considered an iconic snare in the future. It is something special.

A Gretsch USA Custom Stanton Moore Signature model, I believe that it was manufactured in 2011. I found this in a store as new old stock in 2018. It is 4 1/2" deep, Birdseye maple, fitted with die cast hoops. There is something very special about this combination. I have about forty snare drums, this very well could be my favorite. It is versatile, sensitive, and yet can be powerful, has a killer rim shot. I love this drum.

A 2019 Gretsch USA Custom Solid Maple. I loved the Stanton Moore Signature so much, that when this came out I had to have one. It is 1/2" deep, fitted with die cast hoops, and sounds great. I'm not as over the moon with this as I am with the SM sig, but it's a great drum. It's tone is most closely related to my Nashville Radio King and my Noble & Cooley. All three happen to be fitted with die cast hoops.

Now that I got all of that off of my chest, let talk about my DW/Craviotto snares more in depth. First of all, although the difference is small, I do very slightly prefer the natural flamed maple snare. The Craviotto snares do have a unique "something" that makes them different from other solid maple snares. I happen to like that difference. I've described my 2003 flamed maple DW/Craviotto in the past as "the perfect rock & roll snare". I stand by that assessment. It isn't going anywhere. I have a close friend who bought a DW/Craviotto years ago. He loved it, and later fell out of love with it. Recently he put a die cast hoop on the batter and seems to have warmed up to it again.

Solid maple snares in general, and Craviotto in particular are not for everyone. I happen to be a fan.
 
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NobleCooleyNut

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Drummer5359 makes a very valid statement indeed . Solid shell snares are not for everyone . I personally am a fan of solid shell snare drums but not snares fro. All wood types . For clarification I love SS snares from walnut , maple , beech ,sassafras and tulip.
I do not like Cherry SS snares . That is not to say Cherry snares are not desirable for some players just not for me .
SS snares can be an acquired taste for sure .
I have a couple multi ply snares that I love as well , so I am someone that likes to keep their options open when it comes to snares .
I have had periods in the past where the majority of my snare drums were metal shells snares and it has come around to currently I have mostly wood shell snare drums with only a portion being solid shells . Our tastes change as our ears change over our lifetime .
 

patrickwitherow

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I ordered a dw/Craviotto 5.5x14 back in the early 2000's. It was a great drum and very well built. However, looking back, the price I paid didn't match the sound I was hoping to get. While it wasn't bad...it wasn't something that made my head turn. It just sounded like a snare. It frustrated me because I'd hear another snare somewhere that sounded amazing and realize it was a Supra or a common Mapex, etc. So my Crav didn't match what my ears wanted so I sold it. I was young back then and have since found what my ears do like...old WFL 3ply snares and old Pioneers.

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KingLudwig

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It's very possible that there are snare bed issues...along with other mechanical issues. I'd take the drum apart, put the shell on a flat surface and check the beds. Also be sure that the beds line up properly with the strainer and butt. You'd be surprised at how often the beds are off-center! My friend, Chris Heuer (owner of Heuer's Drum Lab in Burbank) has worked on plenty of Craviotto snare drums, including some sent directly from Johnny. Johnny was a master craftsman, but even he could make mistakes. Anyway, take your drum apart and check the shell, hoops, ect. Let us know what you find.

-Mark
Chris ROCKS!!! Absolutely love his work!
 

richardh253

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I love my solid ply Slingerland Nashville era Radio King (NOS thru Maxwells) - and did not run as much $$ as a Craviotto.

My other snares are ply. Love them too. But even though I'm no expert there is that wood-block solidity to the Radio King

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GeneZ

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- There is much to be said for great musicians making given instruments sound good. That said, if the drum has edges that aren't right, improperly cut snare beds, or warped hoops are warped, clearly, you aren't getting what you paid for. With these conditions, a given drum is not going to sound as good as it could. That's not marketing, that's physics.

:study: Many good drum manufactures know how to cut excellent snare beds, and they do not use warped hoops...

Its marketing! Obviously, you have not been able to play a well tuned snare before, and must think its the drum, not your tuning.
Don't feel bad. Lots of drummers do not know how to tune well... Marketing gets them to believe its the drum, not the drummer.
 

RIDDIM

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:study: Many good drum manufactures know how to cut excellent snare beds, and they do not use warped hoops...

Its marketing! Obviously, you have not been able to play a well tuned snare before, and must think its the drum, not your tuning.
Don't feel bad. Lots of drummers do not know how to tune well... Marketing gets them to believe its the drum, not the drummer.
- One could easily argue that many "good" drum manufacturers have put out poorly made drums over the years. That's what kept such guys as Chris Heuer employed over the years.

Not to downplay the importance of marketing, but you do grasp the difference between marketing and physics, I hope.
 

GeneZ

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- One could easily argue that many "good" drum manufacturers have put out poorly made drums over the years. That's what kept such guys as Chris Heuer employed over the years.

Not to downplay the importance of marketing, but you do grasp the difference between marketing and physics, I hope.
Snares- Rogers = excellent construction. Ludwig = same. Slingerland = same. Gretcsch back when had a spotty rep with snares.
Pearl =excellent construction. Tama = same... and many more.

If you want a luxurious look and something to brag about? And, you have the money? Put a Craviotto on your drum rack.

It will not make you into a better drummer. If you are a collector? It will make your collection more exclusive. And , make your endorphins rise? May God bless you.

I have owned Ludwig and Sonor.... Now own three Cadeson snares, all done right. None of them made me into a better, or worse drummer.

If it ain't a piece of sh__t? Its the drummer, not the drum.

I found certain Tama wood snares to be exceptionally well designed. But, I would rather be driving a band with a Ludwig Supraphonic.
 
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GeneZ

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Craviotto is more prestige-hyped than anything else. Sure, the workmanship may be more time consuming and more attention is given to detail. But, if the sound is not superior for the money? Well? Its snob appeal. You can pick on up with a discount for about $2500.00. https://memphisdrumshop.com/craviot...maple-snare-drum-natural-satin-crcus1465prcam

Listen to this. Sounds like nothing exceptional. I have heard lower priced snares that sounded much more satisfying and superior to my ears.

 
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musiqman

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Well that being said.

It’s more about just the sound.

Craviotto’s have a certain feel too, a feel that I have experienced you can’t get from a more affordable wooden snare.

Its good that you can get Craviotto’s for under 1k on the used market.
 


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