Am I The Only One Who Doesn't Like My Craviotto Snare?

Genr

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I have both a Craviotto maple and a Noble and Cooley walnut SS snare. Both great sounding snares. I did however put die cast hoops on the Craviotto. I find the drum easier to dial in with them. As far as value for the money vs. hype? Personal opinion. I have great ply snare drums by Allegra, Gretsch, and Ludwig. The old Premier Signia snare was a monster, sorry I let it go. I think the SS snares are great, and I love playing them, but if money was tight I would not have them. I still sound like me when I play.
 

ARGuy

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Craviotto is more prestige-hyped than anything else. Sure, the workmanship may be more time consuming and more attention is given to detail. But, if the sound is not superior for the money? Well? Its snob appeal. You can pick on up with a discount for about $2500.00. https://memphisdrumshop.com/craviot...maple-snare-drum-natural-satin-crcus1465prcam

Listen to this. Sounds like nothing exceptional. I have heard lower priced snares that sounded much more satisfying and superior to my ears.

If you want to base your opinions of a product on second hand information gleaned from a video played over the internet rather than experiencing it yourself first hand, sure.
Why do you have a problem with others buying and playing something you don't want to spend your money on?
 

GeneZ

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If you want to base your opinions of a product on second hand information gleaned from a video played over the internet rather than experiencing it yourself first hand, sure.
Why do you have a problem with others buying and playing something you don't want to spend your money on?
I don't have any problem with it. I have a problem with it not sounding better than a less expensive drum. It may feel good, but other much less expensive drums do too. It was made with a market in mind. I just do not want some to think they can never have a good snare unless they spend thousands of dollars.

Some people collect art work. They spend lots of money. I would place this snare in that crossover category. Its no longer simply a drum. Its a gilded snare. Why should those who like them have a problem with those who see it as not something worth having?
 

drummer5359

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I have both a Craviotto maple and a Noble and Cooley walnut SS snare. Both great sounding snares. I did however put die cast hoops on the Craviotto. I find the drum easier to dial in with them. As far as value for the money vs. hype? Personal opinion. I have great ply snare drums by Allegra, Gretsch, and Ludwig. The old Premier Signia snare was a monster, sorry I let it go. I think the SS snares are great, and I love playing them, but if money was tight I would not have them. I still sound like me when I play.
Hey there buddy.

You and I both own some very cool drums and we've played each other's snares. Craviotto, Noble & Cooley, Dunnett, Gretsch, Radio King, Allegro, Ludwig... Our taste in snares is pretty much identical. But like you I could use lesser drums, and have.

Also like you, I'm at a point that I don't have to. I love my Gretsch solid maple Stanton Moore Signature snare. Your SS walnut 3 7/8"deep Nobel & Cooley is a freaking monster. My 7" deep Nobel & Cooley SS maple is a treasure. And I think that my 6 1/2" deep flame maple DW/Craviotto is THE perfect rock n roll snare drum.

Maybe I should be embarrassed to have such a ridiculous selection of top quality snare drums to use in local cover bands, but I'm not. I've been a gigging drummer for forty-five years. It took a long time to put together my percussive arsenal, and I enjoy it.

Like you, I sound like me whatever I play. This gear just helps me to be the best possible me.
 
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GeneZ

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Hey there buddy.

You and I both own some very cool drums and we've played each other's snares. Craviotto, Noble & Cooley, Dunnett, Gretsch, Radio King, Allegro, Ludwig... Our taste in snares is pretty much identical. But like you I could use lesser drums, and have.

Also like you, I'm at a point that I don't have to. I love my Gretsch solid maple Stanton Moore Signature snare. Your SS walnut 3 7/8"deep Nobel & Cooley is a freaking monster. My 7" deep Nobel & Cooley SS maple is a treasure. And I think that my 6 1/2" deep flame maple DW/Craviotto is THE perfect rock n roll snare drum.

Maybe I should be embarrassed to have such a ridiculous selection of top quality snare drums to use in local cover bands, but I'm not. I've been a gigging drummer for forty-five years. It took a long time to put together my percussive arsenal, and I enjoy it.

Like you, I sound like me whatever I play. This gear just helps me to be the best possible me.
One does not have to be a professional taste tester to enjoy fine wines like you enjoy your snares. Enjoy .....

The problem I have is when someone selling an expensive bottle of Lafite Rothschild wine, tells others that they will never be satisfied with anything less. Its simply not true.

I enjoy seeing others prospering and enjoying life. I know that some here may think I am anti wealth. Not the case. Just how something is presented will sometimes irk my sense of fairness. Many drummers having very good - well made - snare drums, can get killer sound. Some of them just need to learn how to tune better in some cases! :angel10:
 

ARGuy

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I don't have any problem with it. I have a problem with it not sounding better than a less expensive drum. It may feel good, but other much less expensive drums do too. It was made with a market in mind. I just do not want some to think they can never have a good snare unless they spend thousands of dollars.

Some people collect art work. They spend lots of money. I would place this snare in that crossover category. Its no longer simply a drum. Its a gilded snare. Why should those who like them have a problem with those who see it as not something worth having?
Care to point out a thread or post where someone has wondered why they're going to have to spend thousands to get a snare drum that sounds good?
I guess you're offering a solution in search of a problem.
I don't have a problem with you seeing a Craviotto snare drum as something you don't want to own; I'm just wondering why you feel the need to be critical of anyone that does?
 

GeneZ

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Care to point out a thread or post where someone has wondered why they're going to have to spend thousands to get a snare drum that sounds good?
I guess you're offering a solution in search of a problem.
I don't have a problem with you seeing a Craviotto snare drum as something you don't want to own; I'm just wondering why you feel the need to be critical of anyone that does?
Here is what I was responding to.... The original OP.


Hey guys,

So about 6 months back I was able to pick up a late 90s Craviotto/DW solid maple snare drum. It's 5.5"x14" with a maple shell and is signed by Johnny. The drum is absolutely gorgeous and the workmanship is incredible, but I just can't get it to sound good. I've tried a coated ambassador, earthtone calfskin, and it currently has a controlled sound reverse dot on it. It has incredible sensitivity and body, but it just seems to be boxy with some strange overtones. Has anyone else here not enjoyed the sound of a Craviotto? Do you guys have any suggestions on how to get these drums dialed in? I'm to the point where I might just sell the drum and find something different that I can get a tone i like out of. I'd really like to keep the drum though and just find a way to get it dialed in the way I like.

Any help/opinions would be appreciated. Thanks!
Andlours was assuming it needs to be tuned in a special way to sound good. No. I posted the video of Steve Maxwell, and that snare did not sound good either. Steve knows how to tune! That's way too much money for such a frustrating snare.
 

rculberson

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I recently picked up a 6.5x13 DW/Crav, circa ‘03. Sounds great to me, and should it ever stop sounding great to me, I know it’s got that nice resale value. For now, it’s a keeper.
 

hsosdrum

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Craviotto is more prestige-hyped than anything else. Sure, the workmanship may be more time consuming and more attention is given to detail. But, if the sound is not superior for the money? Well? Its snob appeal. You can pick on up with a discount for about $2500.00. https://memphisdrumshop.com/craviot...maple-snare-drum-natural-satin-crcus1465prcam

Listen to this. Sounds like nothing exceptional. I have heard lower priced snares that sounded much more satisfying and superior to my ears.

Well, it does sound nice, but so do a ton of other wood-shell snares you can get for well under four figures. As for me, I'd rather be driving my wood Dyna-Sonic.
 

GeneZ

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Well, it does sound nice, but so do a ton of other wood-shell snares you can get for well under four figures. As for me, I'd rather be driving my wood Dyna-Sonic.
In other words? Enjoy what you have. You are not missing anything if you snare is already well made. You can take your $350.00 Tama wood snare and not have to think its not good enough. Its the drummer, not the drum 99% of the time. A competent good drummer can make a snare sound great. While another drummer could sit behind that same snare, and those listening might not believe its the same drum.
 

hsosdrum

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In other words? Enjoy what you have. You are not missing anything if you snare is already well made. You can take your $350.00 Tama wood snare and not have to think its not good enough. Its the drummer, not the drum 99% of the time. A competent good drummer can make a snare sound great. While another drummer could sit behind that same snare, and those listening might not believe its the same drum.
Amen, brother Gene! The other day I noticed that I had broken a couple of snare wires on my wood Dyna-Sonic so I took it down in the middle of the session and replaced it on the stand with my brass-on-brass Black Beauty. Two very differently-constructed drums: wood ply vs brass shell, thin stamped vs cast hoops, fancy snare mechanism vs plain throw-off... yet when I listened back to my recording of the entire session I was very surprised at how similar the two drums sounded. There are two reasons for this: 1) As GeneZ mentions above, the sound is mostly in the player, not in the drum, and 2) Both drums had identical heads (Fiberskyn batters over Remo clear snare side). The portion of the sound that isn't in the player is mostly in the drumheads.
 

Whitten

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I don't have any problem with it. I have a problem with it not sounding better than a less expensive drum.
My feeling is the exact opposite.
Any drum can sound good, or even amazing. With a premium drum, if they get it right at the factory, it will sound good in multiple ways in multiple different situations. That's why I own them, because you can depend on them to get you out of a tough spot. A cheaper snare, especially ply, can be killer, but can be difficult to dial in if you are in a non-ideal scenario.
I have sampled hundreds of snares of all makes and values. Sampling is a tough situation because they are spending money on studio time, everyone is waiting for you to dial in an amazing sound, whatever the drum. It can be really hard.
I own a Craviotto Dark Cherry 6.5". I love it's sound, so ended up using it as my main gigging snare. I have played in all kinds of venues, on all kinds of stages, using all levels of rental gear (apart from my snare) and the Crav has always sounded stellar. In every circumstance, bad or good.
That is the value of an expensive Craviotto snare for me. I can depend on it. A $250 ply wood snare? Yes it can sound as good as a $1500 Craviotto, but not every day, not every gig, and I don't want to play a 2 hour show on a crappy sounding snare.
The argument that an expensive boutique snare sounds no better than a cheap snare, especially based on comparison videos, is fine, but doesn't really get to the POINT. The point being is you are mostly paying for a drum that will always sound stellar and never let you down. Money well spent IMO.
 

Whitten

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You can take your $350.00 Tama wood snare and not have to think its not good enough. Its the drummer, not the drum 99% of the time.
Sure, see above. But if the sound man says he's hearing a weird honk from the snare, or a strange buzzing, a cheap $350 snare can be a nightmare to change. That is an actual experience I have had hundreds of times. The cheaper the snare, the more it can only sound good in one way, one tuning, one type of head etc.. You are losing flexibility.
I don't agree that it's 99% the drummer. It's probably 60% the room. If the room sounds bad (gig or studio) there is little a drummer can do to fix it. If the room sounds amazing, pretty much any drummer will sound amazing. If the room sounds bad, I would rather have an amazing and flexible drum than a drum that only sounds it's best when everything else is good.
 

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Sure, see above. But if the sound man says he's hearing a weird honk from the snare, or a strange buzzing, a cheap $350 snare can be a nightmare to change. That is an actual experience I have had hundreds of times. The cheaper the snare, the more it can only sound good in one way, one tuning, one type of head etc.. You are losing flexibility.
I don't agree that it's 99% the drummer. It's probably 60% the room. If the room sounds bad (gig or studio) there is little a drummer can do to fix it. If the room sounds amazing, pretty much any drummer will sound amazing. If the room sounds bad, I would rather have an amazing and flexible drum than a drum that only sounds it's best when everything else is good.
A bad room will not allow any drum to sound great... That is the soundman's job to fix. A drum does not supply its own acoustics. Can you name one great band that has the drummer playing un-mic'd? They never know what room they will be playing in next.

Look.. I don't want to argue over this. If you believe what you just said? Fine.
 

Whitten

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Yeah, because I have played hundreds of shows and hundreds of studio dates. All the mic and sound person do is capture the sound of the drum. If the sound of the drum is meh, then there's little the sound person can do to fix it.
Yeah, I have recorded hundreds of snares, from $50 snares to $5,000 snares. A lot if times the $50 snare can sound great. Usually at one tension, with one perfect set of heads. My Craviotto Dark Cherry sounds stellar at multiple pitches in multiple set ups (for different genres and tunes).
If all you need is one snare sound, then a $250 snare is going to do you just fine.
In my experience, my Crav Dark Cherry has sounded fantastic (and inspired me) in bad sounding rooms, in difficult situations, and that's why it's worth it to me to have a more flexible drum.
 

Whitten

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I only post not to argue, but because I come across this $2500 drum is no better than a $250 drum myth all the time.
Yes, I agree, the difference is not $2000 or even $500. The difference is percentages. But in my experience a $2500 drum can bail you out of a tough spot when the $250 might not.
If you can afford $2500 and the drum inspires you, then I say go for it.
The $400-ish Supraphonics and Acrolites are also stellar drums that usually (IMO) outperform most ply snare drums.
 

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In my opinion, already the title of this thread is misleading.

Because the simple answer is: No. Not the only one.

I'm another one. I also don't like my Craviotto - sometimes. I have an early DW/Craviotto model. The golden hardware is not well made, pitting over years, and does not fit to any of my other drums. I didn't like this look from the very first day, but it was the only version available these days. Sometimes I also don't like the sound, especially if I don't get it tune, mostly because of worn out heads. Craviottos are sensitive to that, as most 'high-end' snares. The last 5% are the most difficult ones. There might be imbalances you don't even recognize at 'cheaper' snares.

But what does this mean? If you don't like the 'Craviotto sound', you already made a mistake in buying one. If you don't get the Craviotto sound out of yours, there might be a problem. You, or the drum might be underperforming. Both can be 'repaired' and I think the recipes can be found in the answers already given.

What I don't get is how to judge the sound of a drum from a 'Maxwell video'. What I learn from these is, that the drum exists, is somehow working, and not severely damaged, but not more. Of course, I have highest respect on his shop and the treasures he offers. But on the videos he is far from hitting hard (he wants to sell), and some drums need that to develop their sound. Or - in other words - to show their difference to other, probably cheaper drums.

I once got an advice for judging good snare drums, I want to share: First play it as slightly as possible (pianissimo). It should produce it's particular sound, but very gently. 'Cheaper' snares don't even get their snare wires working at this moment. Then play it as loud as you can (fortissimo). You should not only hear it in its full volume, you should also feel it - at the inner side of your legs, which are closest to the drum shell. Not many wooden snares can do that, a Craviotto can (at least the ones I tested).

Edit: this accords to live playing. In the studios are different rules, that I don't know much about.
 

Whitten

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It's not a problem disliking a Craviotto snare by the way. Everyone has different taste and needs.
The way I judge a snare is on a gig, or moreso in the studio.It's really hard to tell on a video, or in a store IMO.
The final judge of a snare, or cymbal, or any drum for me, is when it is recorded and it sounds good. If it doesn't;t sound good, or even special, I probably won't be keeping it. If it sounds good on a gig, that's a fairly good seal of approval. A recording could include a video of a gig, or a desk tape.
Watching Youtube videos o demoing in store? No.
 


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