Am I The Only One Who Doesn't Like My Craviotto Snare?

Tarkus

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Maybe my writing could be misunderstood. Of course, I like my Craviotto. So much, that I don't care about golden hardware or whatever...
 

GeneZ

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Yeah, because I have played hundreds of shows and hundreds of studio dates. All the mic and sound person do is capture the sound of the drum. If the sound of the drum is meh, then there's little the sound person can do to fix it.
Yeah, I have recorded hundreds of snares, from $50 snares to $5,000 snares. A lot if times the $50 snare can sound great. Usually at one tension, with one perfect set of heads. My Craviotto Dark Cherry sounds stellar at multiple pitches in multiple set ups (for different genres and tunes).
If all you need is one snare sound, then a $250 snare is going to do you just fine.
In my experience, my Crav Dark Cherry has sounded fantastic (and inspired me) in bad sounding rooms, in difficult situations, and that's why it's worth it to me to have a more flexible drum.
Doctors and dentists spend lots of money for equipment.... If someone is deeply into the pro-aspect? Then its warranted.
 

Whitten

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Yeah, I'm not into the collector aspect to Craviotto, the gold hardware type stuff.
They just sound great IMO
 

CC Cirillo

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Never owned one, but would like to some day. Good to have something to aspire to. Took me years to meet the goal I set to reward myself with a Black Beauty. (Obviously, drumming is an avocation.)

I do know this, I've heard enough Craviatto snares to know they sound good, consistently so, live and recorded, so I'm sold based on that and the testimonials. Really this is my wood aspirational snare. I figure if they are that well-crafted, with some focus on tuning and patience in finding the right heads, etc., I could make it work for me.

A little off topic but not totally. I've used another benchmark for testing my snares in addition to feedback from what a studio engineer or live soundperson tells me: I ask a non-drummer musicians from my bands. One cover bar band--the vote was the Black Beauty, for clarity. Very amplified singer-song writer group-- 5" Classic Maple for earthy crack live and Acrolite in the studio. A country-oriented trio, old mahogany WFL Pioneer.

But for rehearsals where we aren't playing full on hell's bells, and I'm not amplfied , hands down, the people's choice award goes to my Acrolite and deep Sonor birch. Ironically, they prefer my two least expensive snares.
 

JDA

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Hey guys,

So about 6 months back I was able to pick up a late 90s Craviotto/DW solid maple snare drum. It's 5.5"x14" with a maple shell and is signed by Johnny. The drum is absolutely gorgeous and the workmanship is incredible, but I just can't get it to sound good.
what happened Original poster...

.................
How did the story end. ; )
 
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GeneZ

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Yeah, I'm not into the collector aspect to Craviotto, the gold hardware type stuff.
They just sound great IMO
They can sound great. For that price, they better sound great.

And, there are a good number of other snare drums (for a more sane price) that also sound great.

I remember when I had my Ludwigs, I used to attend gigs played by other drummers. Many on Ludwigs. Many of them did not know how to tune. Though I knew the drums could sound great, the drummers did not make it known. When I was playing the same venue my Ludwig drums sounded excellent. Same room . Essentially the same drums. There is something to be learned from that... A lesson I never forgot.

You may find a room where the Craviotto sounds better than some less expensive snare. But, in visa verse? You can not get a certain feel on a very good snare that hits the nail on the head for a band's sound. A nail that with a Craviotto it will only sound passable and generic.

I own three snares for that reason. All three, when added up? Is still cheaper than one gilded Craviotto. Much more versatile that way as well. IMHO.

When I was younger I used to go to dances. I could be watching a drummer with great chops and sense of feel. But, because his drums were not tuned well? It was pretty much only myself in the room who realized how talented that drummer really was.

Half of the talent must be in the tuning. I was watching one drummer I felt was a better drummer than myself. But, his lack of tuning skill kept it hidden from being known. I felt frustrated for him.
 
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Genr

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So there seems to be two debates in this thread. First, do you like the sound of a Craviotto, second, are they worth the money?

On first point, as I said previously, I own one, like it a lot, especially since I put die cast hoops on it. I first heard a Craviotto drum played by Richie Hayward with Little Feat. It was long ago, the company was called Solid, pre DW version and Craviotto drums. The snare sound blew me away. Soundmen or not, the snare was EXCEPTIONAL.

Led me to purchase my DW Craviotto, and go to die cast hoops as were used on the Solid version. I’ve owned it for 20+ years, have done hundreds of gigs with it.

Impressions? A lot of resonance, probably more than you would expect from a snare drum. However, when you start laying into it with a band that resonance simply make the snare sound FAT! What I feel is noteworthy is how responsive this drum is to the way it’s played. I find it hard to understand how anyone can call this drum crap. I have Ply snares, metal snares, several wonderful drums. But none are as responsive to the way they are played as the Craviotto. If I have a gig and I’m facing extensively assorted genre, or not sure what’s coming, the Craviotto is usually my pick. I know it will meet the need.

Okay, on to price. RIDICULOUS! High end drum prices in general are out of control. You certainly can have cheaper alternatives that will accomplish the task. Craviotto’s are a luxury. Nice if you can afford it though.
 

rculberson

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A good buddy of mine is a mechanic here in town. He could certainly drive a bolt or screw with some cheapo screwdriver from Harbor Freight. Instead, he chooses to buy a Snap-On screwdriver for a much higher price. 99% of the rest of us wouldn’t know the difference or care, but for him, it’s worth the money.

Who am I to talk sh!t about him spending the extra money for an expensive screwdriver? He feels it’s necessary to do his job. Same applies here. Sure, there are 18 million snare drums that will get you 95% of the way to a DW/Crav, and 99% of us would never hear a difference. By that rationale, we should all just own a Stage Custom and an Acrolite and be done with it.

No thanks. I’m gonna play my DW/Crav (just one of a few “overpriced/overhyped” snares I own) with the confidence and swagger that I’m using a great tool. 99% won’t notice, but I will, not only in sound but in overall satisfaction and the story behind my acquisition.
 

GeneZ

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A good buddy of mine is a mechanic here in town. He could certainly drive a bolt or screw with some cheapo screwdriver from Harbor Freight. Instead, he chooses to buy a Snap-On screwdriver for a much higher price. 99% of the rest of us wouldn’t know the difference or care, but for him, it’s worth the money.

Who am I to talk sh!t about him spending the extra money for an expensive screwdriver? He feels it’s necessary to do his job. Same applies here. Sure, there are 18 million snare drums that will get you 95% of the way to a DW/Crav, and 99% of us would never hear a difference. By that rationale, we should all just own a Stage Custom and an Acrolite and be done with it.

No thanks. I’m gonna play my DW/Crav (just one of a few “overpriced/overhyped” snares I own) with the confidence and swagger that I’m using a great tool. 99% won’t notice, but I will, not only in sound but in overall satisfaction and the story behind my acquisition.
You are who its for! Enjoy. :angel10:
 

hatandbeard

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Great thread.....

I will go back and read all the comments but wanted to quickly chim in whether this is old or new.

I see some relatively recent posts.

I used to hang out and often work at one of the first Maxwell locations in the Fine Arts Building downtown chicago when a lot of that craviotto stuff was coming in 20 years ago.
I'm a minimalist but often save for things and sell other things to then be able to try things like we all do.
Upon getting the black cherry Craviotto that I wanted it just didn't do anything for me......

That said there's no misunderstanding on my end regarding what any and all drum Builders go through and what they do to bring things to themselves and us and that's an important statement for me to make and I mean that with all of my soul and what music and percussion and drum set means to me. Etc☆♡

I went from trying all kinds of Slingerlands and Ludwig's and Leedys and a hard bop which got stolen and bison volcano and other bison snares and then I moved trying to find the right vintage brass and it wasn't until I found the Canopus Zelkova that everything I've ever wanted was finally put in front of me in a snare drum.
I don't necessarily like the beat brass color and chrome combo between the lugs and diecast rims but I could care less now and I'm sure when I order a custom one that's a little bit deeper than the 6.5 I have now I bet I could probably get them to do what I ask/want should i politely ask.
I own one snare drum and that's it and I finally found it after owning many.
For me it's been amazing.
Great thread worth every penny to try everything out there.
 

KingLudwig

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Well.............I made drums with Johnny Craviotto for around 13 years before he started "Craviotto Drum Company", and all the way till 3 years after his death. DW couldn't sell a sub par shell from Craviotto because We wouldn't sell them one!
Johnny and his partner starting Craviotto Drum Company had nothing to do with DW "selling bad shells". Johnny always loved being a part of the DW family! DW did purchase Vaughncraft shells as well though.

Hey Eric! I hope your well and doing great bro!
MP
 

e.g.

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Hey Eric! I hope your well and doing great bro!
MP
Hi Matthew, I'm hanging in there! Nashville just wasn't in the cards for me. Maybe if I was 20 years old, I would have moved out there. Looking at maybe doing a little something out here on the west coast! We'll see.;)
 


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