Any vintage drum player converted to modern drums?

frankmott

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Why you say "converted"? It's not a religion and it shouldn't be.
I have a modern kit which definitely suits my style, but I would love to play an older kit to see if/how it inspires me.

PS: sorry, but "mojo" doesn't exist imho.
"Converted" has a broader meaning beyond religion, but that connotation is why I put the word in scare-quotes in my post. I suspect the OP meant no religious undertones.

The house was converted to apartments.
The recipe called for converted rice.
All the measurements were converted to metric.
And on and on.

Mojo? Oh, it's real. You can buy a can of it at Walmart.
 

komodobob

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I was caught up in the vintage "fever" for many years and never gave new gear a second look. However, after playing pre 80's drums for the better part of 20 years, I decided to sell off all of that gear (except one 70's acrolite) and now use only modern.
The answer isn't really complicated either. I saw all of those vintage drums, not being used and gathering dust and felt the money they represented would be better put to use helping to fund tuition for my two daughters. I've never regretted selling any of those drums. Now when I see a vintage kit, snare or cymbal for sale, I could really care less about owning any of it. And if that makes me a modern drum snob, then so be it.
 

Stretch Riedle

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Modern kits certainly have their place. I own an INDe Wafarer kit because of that reason. It's only a year old.
But after 35+ years I'm down to one and only one vintage kit, which I will continue to play for a long time. There's just something about using a kit made of 50-year-old wood that was popular during the time that I grew up. My Ludwig kit. And no, I wouldn't replace my vintage Ludwig kit for a modern one, even if you gave it to me.
Stretch
 

Hypercaffium

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"Converted" has a broader meaning beyond religion, but that connotation is why I put the word in scare-quotes in my post. I suspect the OP meant no religious undertones.

The house was converted to apartments.
The recipe called for converted rice.
All the measurements were converted to metric.
And on and on.

Mojo? Oh, it's real. You can buy a can of it at Walmart.
There's no Walmart in Italy. I want some mojo. I want it now.
 

jptrickster

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Meet Mo and Jo!
IMG_3883.JPG
 

JDA

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cribbon

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I'm going to put a target on my back, but here goes. My first good drum set was a used Ludwig Super Classic that my parents helped me buy. It was a great drum set and if I had kept it, it might've been the only drum set I'd have ever needed. But over the years, as I was influenced by music fashion and curiosity, I bought and played other drums just to check them out. It was like buying a new car or meeting a new girl.

I find myself in awe of most folks here who can hear critical differences between different makes and ages of drums, whereas to me, most of them are much of a same. Having played and/or owned Ludwig, Gretsch, Fibes, Slingerland, Rogers, Yamaha, Tama, Pearl, GMS, Mapleworks, Premier, Sonor, Tempus, Monolith, and Ming drums, I personally have landed squarely in the fiberglass/carbon fiber camp.

While my preferences for the sizes and number of drums I want in a drum set have varied over the years, my basic requirements remain constant: I want drums that sound good; are rugged, reliable, light weight, coupled with simple hardware; and are not over-engineered.

Most of my gigging in the last decade or so has been "classic rock," a genre in which nostalgia plays a huge psychological part. When the band starts playing a song, I suspect most of the audience immediately mentally transport themselves back to the golden days of their youth. I like to think we play well, but I also suspect they're not really hearing us, we're just triggering sonic memories of a bygone time, which is what I think vintage drums do for many drummers.

And there's no harm in that; if I could find an old Ludwig Super Classic that was in good shape and didn't cost a fortune, I might buy it, but not because I need it.
 
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Whitten

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I think it's only possible to hear a difference when sat behind the kit playing them. Not from a gig audience or off a record.
Modern DW drums sound more thuddy, tubby than the Japanese kits to my ears. Sonor I haven't played t often, but I get the feeling the birch shells give them a different sound. All the Mapex, Pearl, Yamaha, Tama, GMS etc, etc, they all sound the same to me, albeit very, very good.
Playing between vintage Ludwig, Gretsch, Premier, they sound night and day different from each other and very different to modern kits. We've done a lot of deep sampling sessions where we play and record multiple kits back to back, in the same room with the same mics, and mostly the vintage kits sound different to each other and different to a modern factory kit. We NEED them to sound different (as that is the task at hand), although we try to accentuate the differences with different heads and different tunings.
 

JDA

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that's what I was saying when people get into the intracies of sound ( as pertains to wood and lug count)
See if this is correct.


"People (listener) hear events" (in their perceptions of drum sounds
they hear an event

there's 'no time' to discern to quantify the texture +/- (it happens/occurs and is gone)
it's an event; is the timing- how does the timing- sit where does it sit etc

events in (or out of) time
(it's the) notes (that) are of utmost importance
how a drummer gets there (what tools) is a personal thing
that one can if they chose - adopt simulate or imitate (from others)
but the events are going to be you.

Sound (percussion) ..is a Time event as much as anything.
Tools used is personal
 
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K.O.

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Maybe yea, the switch is from modern to vintage usually. I started with vintage because I inherited a “vintage” kit and got the bug right off the bat. The new shiny drums in stores didn’t look cool and with character to me.

I can guess why you don’t like asian brands and DW, and this is strictly a guess. It is because you do not associate these brands to your favorite era of drumming and drummers. You mentioned Buddy, Radio Kings, etc. Who played Yamaha in the 50’s or 60’s? and DW didn’t even exist as “DW”. These brands are “modern” to you, my guess. I think it is way different now or drummers who started say in the 90’s. I also like US and European brands but some amazing drummers, especially in Jazz, play Yamaha drums, a lot of them, and just that fact makes me like Yamaha, besides the fact that they make amazing drums with consistent great build and sound qualities.
When I bought my new Gretsch USA Customs in 1987 it was a close call between them and possibly a Yamaha set. Wanting to stick to USA made drums is what tipped the scales in favor of Gretsch, although I did go with all Yamaha hardware (toms mounted via RIMS). At that time Rogers and Slingerland were dead, DW was just getting going as far as drum sets, and Ludwig seemed to have lost their way. Even Gretsch seemed to barely exist and I had a hard time even finding a dealer to order the drums through.

In the 90s DW came on strong and Ludwig seemed to slowly regain their footing. In the early 2000s the distribution deal with Kaman brought Gretsch back to the forefront of the drum industry in a big way. But by then the vintage bug had bit me pretty hard. I was reading NSMD and then got on the DCI forum while also being gainfully employed and actually having disposable income ( I attempted to make my "living" as a musician from 1980-1994 and was therefore perpetually broke) to buy drums and such with.

Even the newer drums I do own have some element of vintage throwback to them such as my Classic Maple Downbeat sized set in Salesman sparkle wrap.
 

CherryClassic

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I guess you could say I just moved forward. 63/64 I played a Rogers set till '94 when I purchased a used large late '80's Classic Ludwig kit and still have it. In 2018 I moved to a new CM Ludwig, 5-piece kit. I still like the sound of older drums but I'm really enjoying the new CM's.

I never liked the Modular hardware on the 80's Ludwigs and when I found out about RIMS I changed and that made a big difference. When Ludwig came out with the new ATLAS system I changed again. I'm really liking the TAMA pedals, hi-hat and cymbal/tom stands.

For vintage drums, I wished I still had my Rogers drums. Blue Sparkel

sherm
 

paul

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When I took up drumming again after a long layoff I sold my old Gretsch drums and got a large set of Yamaha Custom Maples. Great drums, but I missed my Gretsch and after a couple of years embarked on a project to get another set, mainly because the Yamahas' lacquer finish was starting to get dinged up. I wound up with a shell pack of toms and basses of various vintages, from round badge to contemporary, all in the same kit. Maybe it's consistent Gretsch construction, but I dare anyone to listen to my seven toms and tell me which ones are which. I have installed modern hardware, though. YESS mounts work well for me.

All my snare drums are modern with the exception of an old Rogers that was a gift. They all sound good, but my DW Craviotto is my favorite, followed closely by a Ridgeland RK.

In my experience, they're all just drums. Tuning and head selection have more effect on the sound than the age of the shells or the angle of the bearing edge to me.
 

CC Cirillo

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You are quite correct. I was thinking just the “drums”. Excellent point about snares.

So I will stand corrected: I love my vintage Ludwig and WFL snares. The 60’s Acro has seen many gigs. The Grandma Brown WFL is great for country and blues. The early 60’s Supra is … a relationship in progress.
 

Carlos McSnurf

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I gave a try to Pork Pie, after retiring my vintage set from gigs. I'm very impressed on how they sound.
Now...back to vintage but different kit. But Pork Pies are solid in my rehearsal space. Soon GMS to be added. I can say I'm slowly converting but keeping vintage sound in use too.
When we talk about hardware there is no doubt. Modern hardware is way far more reliable and sturdier.
 

Ray Dee Oh King

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I play both. I havent had any issues with vintage hardware on my vintage kits yet....."knock on wood". Keeping the hardware cleaned up, and threads lubed up, it all works just fine. My modern kit (INDē) has a vintage vibe and sound to it, but it is a modern kit.
 

MrDrums2112

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Before 2012, I don't think I ever gave vintage drums a second thought. then I attended the CT Drum Show, and it has forever changed my passion for drums and drumming. Since that time, I have bought and sold several drum sets and snare drums, both modern and vintage. I currently own 2 drum sets - Noble & Cooley CD Maples (2012), and 1959 Slingerlands. I mainly gig the Slingerland set. I have met so many people and learned so much about vintage drums over the last few years - it really hase been an amazing ride. Always looking forward to the next drum show (which will be Delaware, at the end of February, 2022).
 


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