Any vintage drum player converted to modern drums?

evolving_machine

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I own only two vintage drums, both Rogers Dynasonics. One is a 5" deep and the other is a 6.5" deep. Both are chrome over brass. I bought them before the newer rogers drums started up again. I have watched the prices of those new Rogers climb and they took the price of the vintage along with them. I like the dynasonics because of the snare cage, and I feel I have more options with it then other snares. I would have liked to have purchased some of the vintage drums prior to their over inflated prices though.

I do own quite a few vintage cymbals that I bought before things started hyper-inflating. The prices of Zildjian's from the 50's - early 70's are high, and the Zildjian K Istanbul's are close to the price for a car. However, now there are other options for quality cymbals such as: Istanbul, Agop, and some of the custom cymbal makers that I would like to try out. There are now a lot more drum manufactures that are easier to reach and purchase from too.

With drums, a lot happens with the bearing edges of the drums. So if the edges are damaged your drum won't seal correctly, and then the drum will not let the diaphragm (drum head) respond efficiently. Another issue with the older drums, is that the shells could be out of round. Again, not letting the diaphragm respond efficiently.

I've watched some of the videos showing the differences between shell material on the same drum with very similar tunings and how the different woods effect the sound. How the shell is constructed by how many plies, and which woods are used, I don't think is as important as the bearing edges and the drum itself being within a tolerance or roundness. I have watched some of the videos and have been able hear some of the differences that people claim happen from the woods, but the sounds through the videos there are not that much of a difference as I would expect. I would like to conduct that test by myself live instead of watch a video on it, and maybe I could get more out of the differences by playing or just by being in the same room when they are played.

There are some quality new kits that are priced better than many of the vintage drums. The new kits are manufactured using a lot more accuracy than the older kits because of CNC and CMM and other methods controlling the quality of manufactured products. So, the bearing edges and the roundness of the shells have a high chance of being better now too.

There are some vintage drums that are not produced anymore, such as the Gladstone's. Those drums came out in the early 30's. They were unique in that you could tune both heads from the top using a combination of different keys. But, that elaborate tuning system is not needed as much now, simply because almost everyone is using plastic instead of skin heads. The unique drums may dictate a higher price simply because of their uniqueness. The new Rogers company is a good example that the demand for a specific type of vintage drum will be produced if there is a demand for it.
 

bassanddrum84

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I did the opposite. Started on vintage went modern and now back to vintage. Minus hardware all dw and modern cymbals. I want it to work so I don’t have a problem updating thing to make it work.
 

evolving_machine

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I did the opposite. Started on vintage went modern and now back to vintage. Minus hardware all dw and modern cymbals. I want it to work so I don’t have a problem updating thing to make it work.
My first kit was a Keystone badge Ludwig, two bass drums and two hanging toms. The kit was stolen and I thought it was a good time to take a break from drumming. When I got back into it I got a Catilina Club Gretsch kit, then I got a Pearl Masters, and then for some reason, I wanted more snare drums. That is when I got the one and then the second dynasonics. As a kid I always admired those snares,
 

bassanddrum84

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My first kit was a Keystone badge Ludwig, two bass drums and two hanging toms. The kit was stolen and I thought it was a good time to take a break from drumming. When I got back into it I got a Catilina Club Gretsch kit, then I got a Pearl Masters, and then for some reason, I wanted more snare drums. That is when I got the one and then the second dynasonics. As a kid I always admired those snares,
Same I started on a keystone Ludwig kit as well and mine got stolen too!
 

69OysterBlue

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My first kit was a 68 Ludwig Super Classic to which I added a second mounted tom. Those drums served me well for many years and then sat idle as I focused on work and family in the late ’80’s and ’90s. When I got back into playing and had some $$$ to spend on additional kits, I always wondered how things might have sounded if I had gone down a different path. That drove me to own a couple of Slingerland, Gretsch and Camco kits - but all still vintage. My preference has always remained with Ludwig and so I have acquired several more vintage KB kits as well.
I really don’t need any more kits and have considered thinning the herd and making one last big investment in a modern kit, but the choices are so varied that I’m not sure what I would buy (DW, Yamaha, Sonor, maybe another Ludwig). Anyway - this thread has been interesting to read and (once again) has fanned the flames of making another purchase. My wife thanks you all (with her trademark sarcastic snarl)!
Happy New Year!
 

A.TomicMorganic

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If I can make a drum sound pleasing to my ear, it's a keeper. Have owned many vintage drums and many brands. Am currently playing a 2016 Natal bop kit with a one pice maple shell snare that I just built. Still own and will never part with, a 1920 Ludwig NOB, and a Slingy Artist single ply from 1965.
 


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