Anyone here have experience with Audimute products? Or soundproofing a basement for drums?

cafunko

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I will be closing on a new property in July and I have an 820 sq ft basement available to build a drum room.

It's wide open with partially finished walls, a concrete floor, and a suspended ceiling. My goal is to have a room where I can practice without my bothering new neighbors. I think that I will end up framing a 'room within a room' to cut down on sound transmission. Audimute makes some sound absorption and deadening products that have caught my attention, namely the Peacemaker sound barriers and the wall panels.

Any experience with these? Thanks in advance.

https://www.audimute.com/

-Cafunko
 

bconrad

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Just installed 4 AudiMute blankets in my office. It significantly deadened the sound and appears to have helped with soundproofing. Be forewarned: The smell is strong and lasts awhile.
 

EyeByTwoMuchGeer

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If you’re serious about doing all that construction and room treatment, I’d highly suggest reaching out to Carter and scheduling a “lesson”

He’s been doing a ton of lessons of all kinds since his Broadway gig got shut down. His rates are very reasonable and given that you’re likely talking about sinking hundreds or thousands of dollars into your project, an hour long Skype call with Carter might be really helpful. He’s had a lot of experience building a home studio with the Audimute stuff. If I was doing a home studio project, I’d pay him for an hour of his time and get all of his pointers. He’s got a lot to offer in terms of what works and what doesn’t and certainly what to look out for. Good luck!
 

owr

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Tons of threads lately with good info, even better Info on the internet at large.

I really like GIK Acoustics products, more for the sound treatment you will need if you do actually seal a room. Fantastic customer service, and products are clean, no smell necessary.

Fir the actual sound proofing, Auralex has a good short primer (Search Auralex 101 or the like), but you don’t need all their fancy/expensive products.

Better yet, get comfortable and dig in on John Sayers forums. There are no real short cuts to getting sound proofing. But you also don’t need special products, just good physics.

Good luck and have fun!
 

cafunko

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Thanks for the responses thus far, I really appreciate the input. I've got a lot of planning and research to do!
 

MusicianMagic

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The very first thing you should do is, have someone play your drums (they don't need to play music, just the individuals: cymbals, snare, toms & bass drum, while walking around outside. You need to locate what sounds & where they are leaking.
Treat the actual problems. You may not even need to treat everything. My drums are in my living room. I blocked one window (with sheetrock) and have a sliding door I made for the opening to my kitchen. I have sliding glass doors from the living room to my backyard but that sound doesn't travel to anyone's house. One neighbor said they can hear some from that when they sit in their back patio but told me they're glad I don't complain when they sit in their patio & make noise.
 

Tuckerboy

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All the usual suspects regarding room within a room construction methods. I have a room in the basement and within a section of that room I put together a EMT conduit frame and have it enclosed with Producers Choice sound absorption blankets which works pretty well and helps “treat” the room for my needs.
02ECF25D-E5CB-4450-A1FB-7D5B041C9B1B.jpeg
6B64446F-C8F8-43E4-9405-C142321B7601.jpeg
 

BennyK

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If you're able to build a room within a room, that pretty well guarantees sound proofing over most other alternatives . Pay special attention to shock mounting the frame with a heavy bead of silicone or acoustic caulking ( messy stuff ) , interrupting lines of transmission and so on . A raised floor on spaced hockey pucks or old bike tires works well . There's plenty of DIY info out there on UTUBE , you don't have to spend as much as you think . Good luck .
 
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chappy

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All the usual suspects regarding room within a room construction methods. I have a room in the basement and within a section of that room I put together a EMT conduit frame and have it enclosed with Producers Choice sound absorption blankets which works pretty well and helps “treat” the room for my needs. View attachment 447676 View attachment 447677
Do these blankets cut the slapback and flutter well? How are they in terms of tuning a room?
 

dboomer

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Do these blankets cut the slapback and flutter well? How are they in terms of tuning a room?
They help above a certain frequency (mainly their thickness). So you will be removing the highs but not removing the lows. So you have to be careful that you don’t end up with a “tubby” room.

If you have ever been in an anechoic chamber you’ll notice the fiberglass wedges that line the room are 4-6-8 feet thick.

Moving them out a bit more from the walls will lower the cutoff frequency a bit for free.
 

dwdave

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I will be closing on a new property in July and I have an 820 sq ft basement available to build a drum room.

It's wide open with partially finished walls, a concrete floor, and a suspended ceiling. My goal is to have a room where I can practice without my bothering new neighbors. I think that I will end up framing a 'room within a room' to cut down on sound transmission. Audimute makes some sound absorption and deadening products that have caught my attention, namely the Peacemaker sound barriers and the wall panels.

Any experience with these? Thanks in advance.

https://www.audimute.com/

-Cafunko
Yes, I have experience with these. I have some panels in my music room. They absorb sound just fine, look nice and the room sounds great. No issues at all with them over the years, the hanging tabs work great. Sound proofing is something different than sound absorption, but they will help the room sound better. I got the standard panels. I would say if you will be having musicians leaning against them you may want to get some that are more rigid, I don't let errant gtr players lean against mine....hahaha..
 

owr

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BTW, I love this video, discovered it by accident myself a few weeks ago. That demo he does around 4:20 of the untreated room is familiar. When we finally got the doors up in my (much smaller) isolated room, I grabbed a 60s acrolite I had just picked up and gave the room a little test. Holy $!%$ it almost took my head off. Funny thing about sound proofing, if you dont let sound out - you dont let sound out... It doesnt just magically disappear.

For the OP, one thing I've reflected on since is that whats good for sound treatment in a live room for playing is very different for sound treatment in a mixing room. Seems like most advice out there is for the latter, and following this advice I think I may have over done it with absorption in my little studio. My room is about 8' x 10', not great dimensions to start with. I have GIKs Tri-traps floor to ceiling in the 4 vertical corners, 4 GIK poly diffusors on the walls and (so far) 4 4" deep panels on the walls for additional absorption. I still have materials to build a few more including for overhead hanging off the ceiling, but the room is already pretty dead. Ive found myself needing to hit the drums harder to pull sounds out of them. I may down the line revisit this a bit and try and build up a whole wall of diffusion, but for now am just enjoying having a place I can play at midnight.

I think I said it before but I'll repeat, I love the absorption material tat GIK uses:


There is also a more dense version that I used for my 4" panels, but talking to folks there they recommended the 1.6 for almost everything (probably why its sold out). Its tough paying for the shipping but this stuff is so clean, no odor at all, I vastly prefer it over any conventional insulation or even Auralex's comparable Rockwool. I've never used the audimute products but shy away as soon as I hear there is some degree of smell that needs to be diffused/tolerated.

Carter Mclean use their products.
He's a member here. Cartermclean
 

nk126

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Nice frame!

I have the same blankets in my basement practice space. The space is a somewhat odd, long skinny rectangle that opens on three sides (two to other rooms, one to the stairs). Hung blankets on three walls, and stretch the fourth blanket wall-to-wall behind the throne to form a fourth "wall" -- much like in your photos. I really need to finally install a rod of some sort so that fourth blanket can be slid open/shut. As it is, I hang/unhang every time I play.

Same feedback on the blankets - they absorb some sound but probably do more for my ears in the space than blocking it from going outside.

+1 to the previous advice to have someone else play while you walk around outside. I was surprised by the results (happily so, lucky for me).

All the usual suspects regarding room within a room construction methods. I have a room in the basement and within a section of that room I put together a EMT conduit frame and have it enclosed with Producers Choice sound absorption blankets which works pretty well and helps “treat” the room for my needs. View attachment 447676 View attachment 447677
 

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