Anyone planning/dreaming about a move?

Hop

DFO Veteran
Joined
Feb 11, 2012
Messages
2,606
Reaction score
1,095
Location
L.A., CA
.... Plus I love the language and I feel at home there. I´m a Spaniard in disguise.
Ha! Yes I could tell by your avatar eyebrows and moustache!!! ;-)
I would find it almost impossible to move to another country. My adaptability falls far short of yours and others.

I'm having a lot of trouble trying to figure out my next move. I retired, have money for a nice place, want to relocate to a different state (one that doesn't have state income tax like CA)...
I'd also have to say So Cal has no doubt skewed my view on criteria, there are so many conveniences here like good medical/dental/shopping/entertainment, that are pretty much ubiquitous (climate too).
Nevada is where my oldest friends live, but that desert climate and close quarter living is giving me the heebie-jeebies every time I look at real-estate.
Tennessee keeps coming back to the top of the list... But I'm have so much trouble narrowing down areas. I almost feel like that legendary turtle on top a fence post - how did I get here and how do I get off?
 

Old Drummer

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2019
Messages
738
Reaction score
621
I was reading Rich K's thread about Keene and wanted to see if anyone else is contemplating or dreaming (like me) about the greener grass on the other side.

Recently I have been watching way too many shows on TV about people moving to the Caribbean :) I am an immigrant and restless by nature and I feel like I have had enough cold to last me a life time . A nice two bedroom condo, overlooking the Caribbean, in a nice gated community with a pool and other amenities , in Dominican Republic, for $199.000USD. Totally doable. The question is, what do you do there, how do you survive? A drum shop will not do but maybe a small full music shop, supplying gear to people and the resorts? Who knows, one can dream...The thing is , I don't want to do it when I retire. I want to do it now, when I can still do stuff.

Anyone has property in the Caribbean, or is/has contemplated the prospect?
Well, 14 years ago I jumped ship, not exactly to the Caribbean, but that ocean is on one side, and not exactly to greener pastures, although we do have rain forests. I also did it before I was retirement age, and I recommend that. The younger you are, the easier it is to adjust.

But I have a few opinionated words of advice.

First, don't buy property, at least until you've been where you're going a couple years. know your way around, and are pretty sure you're going to stay. The first thing expats think of is to buy a house. Many get fleeced, and not a few get tired of their greener pastures, move back, and sell for half what they paid. Plus, $199,000 USD is a LOT of money. Once you know your way around, I'll bet you that you'll find equivalent property for half or a third that. Always rent first, and sometimes last. After you run the numbers, it often turns out to be cheaper to rent.

Second, think twice about a gated community. Some people like them anyway, but if you're going to be content settling in another country, you're going to have to fit into that country. Barricading yourself in a beachfront expat enclave is a recipe for boredom, unless your idea of fun is sitting around with other expats complaining about how hard it is to find an honest maid. If you're afraid of the people in your destination country and expect to live separated from them, you might rethink your move. If in the end you prefer a gated community, fine, but attitude is important.

Third, for God's sake, look carefully at the details. My favorite example of expats who don't are those who think the healthcare system is great simply because they can get an appointment with a doctor for $20 and their prescription filled for $10, only to end up in a hospital with a kidney stone having their credit card charged $1000 a day or realizing that the cancer treatment they need doesn't even exist in the country.

Fourth, take some time to understand the political and economic situation. While dictators aren't always a problem for expats, their revolutionary opponents burning tires in your street and clashing with the military can get annoying quickly. Related, while hurricanes can be an issue, so also is the government's ability to respond to national disasters. With respect to the economy, a lot of very poor people can be a problem. Many expats like a lot of poor people because they can "live like kings," but they don't realize that kings have knights to protect them. If you have to live in a gated community to be safe (although actually the guards hired by gated communities are sometimes in cahoots with criminals) or drive a car to avoid the riffraff on the street, how much money are you really saving (and how good is your quality of life)?

There are many other things to consider, such as learning the local language if you don't already know it, but these are enough for now.

In the end, the move works for some people--it has for me--although I read that half or more expats return to where they came from within a year. But as others have mentioned, sometimes you get the same bang for your buck with less hassle by simply moving to a place like South Carolina or Florida. Ironically, Tybee Island next to Savannah, GA might not be a bad place. I personally even kind of like Savannah, though I agree that the summer heat can be oppressive. There are lots of options.

Years ago I asked a middle-aged, single German immigrant in a middle-size Midwestern US city why he chose to live there. His response was that "everyone needs to find their own place." More recently, I asked an expat where I live now why he lives here. He said that "everybody has to be somewhere." For me, these two answers kind of sum it up.

Lest I be coy, I'm in Costa Rica, with the local equivalent of a "green card." I have also spent a fair amount of time in Nicaragua. (In the US, I've lived from New York to California, and various places in between.) If I wanted to, I could live on the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica, but I don't want to. The vibes I get from the gap between the affluent expats and the poor locals leave me uncomfortable. The vibes I get in Nicaragua aren't the same (and I love Nicaragua) but there are enough off-putting things about that country to have dissuaded me from living there.

Oddly, in Costa Rica I just live in a university town, which is pretty much how I lived in the US too. The main differences are that the weather is nicer, I'm enrolled in the much cheaper but decent public health system, and I don't need a car. The beer is also cheaper and there's no expectation that bartenders are tipped. I do have to navigate in what is for me a foreign language, but otherwise it's the same basic lifestyle at half the cost and better weather. Wait, I still haven't managed to find enough players to put together a country band. Blues and jazz are here, but not country. I'm working on it, though.
 

Pickinator

DFO Veteran
Joined
Aug 12, 2005
Messages
2,452
Reaction score
225
Location
Eagle River WI
We live in northern Wisconsin and are considering a move to Port Charlotte or Cape Coral Florida when I retire
in 3 years 11 months.
 

spart

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
49
Reaction score
34
Location
Europe
Howyas,

I'm a Brit who has lived in The Rep of Ireland for twenty years, i've owned property here for 30. I also lived in London for 12 years from 85 to 97, it served its purpose. Gimme the rural life anytime ...

For me quality of life is an attitude, with a strong correlation to those who surround you. Witness the turmoil in my former country of residence. On that basis the Irish have the best of it.

That said if we got the itch it would be either Menorca or Sri Lanka. We like islands.

Spart
 

komodobob

DFO Master
Double Platinum Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2005
Messages
3,837
Reaction score
580
I've told my wife a dozen times I'd like to move to a warmer climate after I fully retire. Unfortunately for me, she would never leave NY, because her Mother and Sis are here and both only live 10 minutes from us. Plus, we have two school age children, 12 and 9, so we would want them to finish school here. Maybe after the kids get in college, I can convince her to look at SC. I always liked it down there.
 
Last edited:

Monday317

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2011
Messages
90
Reaction score
62
Location
Western PA
I was reading Rich K's thread about Keene and wanted to see if anyone else is contemplating or dreaming (like me) about the greener grass on the other side.

Recently I have been watching way too many shows on TV about people moving to the Caribbean :) I am an immigrant and restless by nature and I feel like I have had enough cold to last me a life time . A nice two bedroom condo, overlooking the Caribbean, in a nice gated community with a pool and other amenities , in Dominican Republic, for $199.000USD. Totally doable. The question is, what do you do there, how do you survive? A drum shop will not do but maybe a small full music shop, supplying gear to people and the resorts? Who knows, one can dream...The thing is , I don't want to do it when I retire. I want to do it now, when I can still do stuff.

Anyone has property in the Caribbean, or is/has contemplated the prospect?
The only move I’ve contemplated was from film to digital. I found the Sigma/Foveon sensor to match my medium format film image quality and could no longer justify the time spent with analog photography.

That said, there is no chance in Hell I will invest in a digital drum kit. Ever.

Nor is there any possibility I’d ever reside anywhere but the United States of America. I was born here and have traveled a little in Europe. No other country on this Earth can tempt me to reconsider my place of residency. Ever.
 

DavedrumsTX

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2014
Messages
243
Reaction score
284
Location
Dallas, Texas
I’ve beencoaching quite a few people on this topic. I personally made a big move pre-pandemic at 56 in 2018. I was making incredible money, but my career of 34 years was robbing me of my joy and working 65-70 hours a week was killing me slowly. I had everything the material world lusts for, but I had lost my smile. I had close friends die and God guided me to walk away.

My beautiful wife of 34 years was totally supportive. We sold the big house, dialed back our lifestyle and I consult and coach now. While I may not be able to just buy a Sonor SQ2 or Craviotto kit on a whim anymore, I am happier than I have ever been.

I live on a small pond in a very unpretentious neighborhood now and fly fish in my backyard. My commute is from the coffee maker to the spare bedroom. I see my wife and my drums more than ever.

Is my life perfect? No, but I was able to find greater joy and peace. You can too.
 

Fibes

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2008
Messages
57
Reaction score
46
I've lived in New York, Florida, Arizona, California & currently North Carolina. Spent significant time in Texas & Ohio. Traveled many countries and got to do more than play tourist in some. I have been strongly considering moving to Japan. I had a 3 year visa to go last May, even planning on buying a house (they don't like renting to foreigners) but the pandemic stopped things. Fortunately I can work almost anywhere if I have a studio to use.

Its easy to think somewhere else will be better. Many move to places for the wrong reasons. Often especially Florida, Las Vegas & Southern California, move there thinking they will be living the tourist lifestyle. Here in North Carolina we have a lot of "Halfbacks." They are people from Northern states that moved to Florida but then move Halfway back home to the Carolinas. Often they can't afford to move back to their home state. They find salaries in FL are low, expenses can be high & during tourist season going out is priced for northerners. Many don't like the weather, tho they enjoy it for a week during vacation.

I have friends that have retired to places like Mexico, Portugal, Costa Rica, Thailand. Mostly because the cost of living is less. Most say it is like when they lived in the US. Most locals they are friends with are Americans or other ex-pats. They stay around their communities just like they did before the move.

I always recommend to move to gain something you need but don't have where you currently live. Costs, weather, access to something. I always researched & planned my moves except my first move.

"The grass is always greener over the septic tank." But it does smell awful.

We are positioning to move out of FL, either to TN or SC for retirement. I love FL, but am tired of it. Wife and I are from NE and want to get closer. TN and SC have same tax structures as FL re: drawing retirement. But we both have been successful with jobs/wages, etc. It can be done - especially if you research the job market before you come here. If you just want to wait tables or think you'll play 6 nights a week, you're financial situation will be difficult. Housing is expected to continue to skyrocket for the next year, at least. 3 bedroom apt around $1600/mo. House rental starts there. Houses sell in an hour currently, usually overbid by $10,000.
 

CigarScott

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2020
Messages
120
Reaction score
105
Location
Alabama
Well, 14 years ago I jumped ship, not exactly to the Caribbean, but that ocean is on one side, and not exactly to greener pastures, although we do have rain forests. I also did it before I was retirement age, and I recommend that. The younger you are, the easier it is to adjust.

But I have a few opinionated words of advice.

First, don't buy property, at least until you've been where you're going a couple years. know your way around, and are pretty sure you're going to stay. The first thing expats think of is to buy a house. Many get fleeced, and not a few get tired of their greener pastures, move back, and sell for half what they paid. Plus, $199,000 USD is a LOT of money. Once you know your way around, I'll bet you that you'll find equivalent property for half or a third that. Always rent first, and sometimes last. After you run the numbers, it often turns out to be cheaper to rent.

Second, think twice about a gated community. Some people like them anyway, but if you're going to be content settling in another country, you're going to have to fit into that country. Barricading yourself in a beachfront expat enclave is a recipe for boredom, unless your idea of fun is sitting around with other expats complaining about how hard it is to find an honest maid. If you're afraid of the people in your destination country and expect to live separated from them, you might rethink your move. If in the end you prefer a gated community, fine, but attitude is important.

Third, for God's sake, look carefully at the details. My favorite example of expats who don't are those who think the healthcare system is great simply because they can get an appointment with a doctor for $20 and their prescription filled for $10, only to end up in a hospital with a kidney stone having their credit card charged $1000 a day or realizing that the cancer treatment they need doesn't even exist in the country.

Fourth, take some time to understand the political and economic situation. While dictators aren't always a problem for expats, their revolutionary opponents burning tires in your street and clashing with the military can get annoying quickly. Related, while hurricanes can be an issue, so also is the government's ability to respond to national disasters. With respect to the economy, a lot of very poor people can be a problem. Many expats like a lot of poor people because they can "live like kings," but they don't realize that kings have knights to protect them. If you have to live in a gated community to be safe (although actually the guards hired by gated communities are sometimes in cahoots with criminals) or drive a car to avoid the riffraff on the street, how much money are you really saving (and how good is your quality of life)?

There are many other things to consider, such as learning the local language if you don't already know it, but these are enough for now.

In the end, the move works for some people--it has for me--although I read that half or more expats return to where they came from within a year. But as others have mentioned, sometimes you get the same bang for your buck with less hassle by simply moving to a place like South Carolina or Florida. Ironically, Tybee Island next to Savannah, GA might not be a bad place. I personally even kind of like Savannah, though I agree that the summer heat can be oppressive. There are lots of options.

Years ago I asked a middle-aged, single German immigrant in a middle-size Midwestern US city why he chose to live there. His response was that "everyone needs to find their own place." More recently, I asked an expat where I live now why he lives here. He said that "everybody has to be somewhere." For me, these two answers kind of sum it up.

Lest I be coy, I'm in Costa Rica, with the local equivalent of a "green card." I have also spent a fair amount of time in Nicaragua. (In the US, I've lived from New York to California, and various places in between.) If I wanted to, I could live on the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica, but I don't want to. The vibes I get from the gap between the affluent expats and the poor locals leave me uncomfortable. The vibes I get in Nicaragua aren't the same (and I love Nicaragua) but there are enough off-putting things about that country to have dissuaded me from living there.

Oddly, in Costa Rica I just live in a university town, which is pretty much how I lived in the US too. The main differences are that the weather is nicer, I'm enrolled in the much cheaper but decent public health system, and I don't need a car. The beer is also cheaper and there's no expectation that bartenders are tipped. I do have to navigate in what is for me a foreign language, but otherwise it's the same basic lifestyle at half the cost and better weather. Wait, I still haven't managed to find enough players to put together a country band. Blues and jazz are here, but not country. I'm working on it, though.
What part of Nicaragua did you live in? I have thoughts of retiring to Esteli if I live long enough to retire.
 

coastie

DFO Veteran
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
1,702
Reaction score
52
Location
Gig Harbor, WA
This is a great thread. I’ve enjoyed it.
I haven’t seen many west coast posts here so I’ll chime in from western Wa. State. I’ve been really growing weary of the area I’ve lived for 50 years. The only reason I’m still here is my Dad, In-laws and my 2 grandsons. If it weren’t for them, I’d jump on the next plane outta here. The problem is.....Go where? This place used to be the absolute most awesome area imaginable. To me, it’s not anymore. The political climate makes it hard for me but that’s nothing I’d like to really discuss on a drum forum. The rain I can deal with. From April to November, there’s no better weather anywhere that I know of.
At 61 and recently retired....I now have time to really think about things and I’m presently coming up empty on relocating.
 

mtarrani

DFO Star
Joined
Sep 24, 2006
Messages
9,404
Reaction score
1,662
Location
Deltona, FL
This is a great thread. I’ve enjoyed it.
I haven’t seen many west coast posts here so I’ll chime in from western Wa. State. I’ve been really growing weary of the area I’ve lived for 50 years. The only reason I’m still here is my Dad, In-laws and my 2 grandsons. If it weren’t for them, I’d jump on the next plane outta here. The problem is.....Go where? This place used to be the absolute most awesome area imaginable. To me, it’s not anymore. The political climate makes it hard for me but that’s nothing I’d like to really discuss on a drum forum. The rain I can deal with. From April to November, there’s no better weather anywhere that I know of.
At 61 and recently retired....I now have time to really think about things and I’m presently coming up empty on relocating.
I've lived in both King and Kitsap counties as both a sailor and IT consultant for year long stints on six different occasions. I liked the area, but just could not envision living there full time. I felt too confined and bored there. But that can be a big plus. The rain never bothered me because it was more of a constant drizzle. Mobile, AL has a lot more annual rainfall, but it's not as prolonged. Honestly, it was the gray days that I most loved. And, yeah, April to November are glorious. Plus it never gets really cold in the Puget Sound area. I liked that as well.
 

Living Dead Drummer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2017
Messages
87
Reaction score
97
Location
Los Angeles, CA
I’ve honestly been thinking about heading to Nashville.
been living in LA for over 12 years, and have a well established career, however with the state of the industry due to the pandemic, I’m thinking Nashville might be the best option to continue sustaining said career.
 

mtarrani

DFO Star
Joined
Sep 24, 2006
Messages
9,404
Reaction score
1,662
Location
Deltona, FL
I’ve honestly been thinking about heading to Nashville.
been living in LA for over 12 years, and have a well established career, however with the state of the industry due to the pandemic, I’m thinking Nashville might be the best option to continue sustaining said career.
If I had to move to that part of TN it would be a Nashville suburb - I liked Murfreesboro a lot, and Christiana also, although Christiana was a bit too rural for my tastes. But Murfreesboro had a compelling vibe. Nashville is too big and sprawling, but would probably seem quaint to you if you are coming from LA. I moved to FL from Orange County (Tustin) and it was culture shock. I think that you would probably experience the same in Nashville. Or not.
 

swarfrat

tympanus laqueus XV
Joined
Dec 15, 2014
Messages
6,095
Reaction score
1,270
Actually, it's from "Of mice and men", but you would've gotten partial credit for Buggs Bunny.
 


Top