Anyone store or play their drums in a shed?

DanRH

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⬆ Love the Phil Collins fill at the end too! well done!
Thanks. This was a demo for my old singer from the 60's whose son asked me to come up with a part for his song. I was using the Yamaha Rec'n Share app with on my phone with the EAD10. fFun!
 

Jazzhead

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Thanks for sharing pics and detailed explanation. I am glad I read it before it disappeared again, it’s not there anymore. It just says “more pics…”. That shed is really a tall one, isn’t it? Tuff shed has the Premier tall model which I think has a clear height of 7’8” or something. Anyway, when the time comes I’ll figure it out. Now I need to start saving for this shed and sell what I don’t use. This will serve my world of music much better, thanks Dan.
 

DanRH

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Thanks for sharing pics and detailed explanation. I am glad I read it before it disappeared again, it’s not there anymore. It just says “more pics…”. That shed is really a tall one, isn’t it? Tuff shed has the Premier tall model which I think has a clear height of 7’8” or something. Anyway, when the time comes I’ll figure it out. Now I need to start saving for this shed and sell what I don’t use. This will serve my world of music much better, thanks Dan.
I saw that I posted twice so I deleted the video and explanation because it was redundant. Hey, if you want to do a road trip, come on up to the Bay Area.
 

Jazzhead

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I saw that I posted twice so I deleted the video and explanation because it was redundant. Hey, if you want to do a road trip, come on up to the Bay Area.
Next time I am in SF Bay area, I’ll hit you up. I love it there.
 

bpaluzzi

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I kept my 66 Club Dates in an uninsulated shed in Southwestern PA for 10 years. No AC or heat except for when I was inside playing. Well below freezing in the winter to 90+ with humidity in the summer.

Three things happened:
1 - the bass drum hoops started losing their paint. They weren't being moved around, but sections would flake off when I would play. Think it was the moisture + freezing getting behind the painted hoops and flaking it off.
2 - all of the lugs / claws / tension rods / tom mounts / bass drum rail all got a whitish-grey patina on the chrome. This comes off easily with the aluminum foil / hot water method
3 - the hardware (speed master pedal, spur lok hats, buck rogers snare, 2 flat based cymbal stands, the spurs, the floor tom legs + clamps (push-button style), and the actual rail console got covered in a thin layer of rust. it comes off with aluminum foil (mostly), but it's SUPER tricky to get out of tight spots.

No problems with the shells going out of round or delaminating, and the wrap (sky blue pearl) is fine -- discolored, but that was the case before they went into the shed. Bass drum hoops are still structurally sound, just flaky paint.
 

Jazzhead

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I kept my 66 Club Dates in an uninsulated shed in Southwestern PA for 10 years. No AC or heat except for when I was inside playing. Well below freezing in the winter to 90+ with humidity in the summer.

Three things happened:
1 - the bass drum hoops started losing their paint. They weren't being moved around, but sections would flake off when I would play. Think it was the moisture + freezing getting behind the painted hoops and flaking it off.
2 - all of the lugs / claws / tension rods / tom mounts / bass drum rail all got a whitish-grey patina on the chrome. This comes off easily with the aluminum foil / hot water method
3 - the hardware (speed master pedal, spur lok hats, buck rogers snare, 2 flat based cymbal stands, the spurs, the floor tom legs + clamps (push-button style), and the actual rail console got covered in a thin layer of rust. it comes off with aluminum foil (mostly), but it's SUPER tricky to get out of tight spots.

No problems with the shells going out of round or delaminating, and the wrap (sky blue pearl) is fine -- discolored, but that was the case before they went into the shed. Bass drum hoops are still structurally sound, just flaky paint.
Thanks for sharing your experience. It’s good to know that and what to look for. Where I am in LA, the temperatures could go from 35F (usually doesn’t get this low, more like 40ish) to 105F throughout the year. I am planning to have a window AC running when I am in there playing in summer.
 
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Tornado

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I'll add to bpaluzzi's experience a bit and say that if you're in an area with high humidity, if the chrome on your hardware has much metal to metal wear on it, like thrown in a hardware bag bumping around together, it'll never be the same in those spots. I ruined a nice set of Pearl double braced stands this way. Boom arms are trash because of all the places where they'd been clamped down. That's just use, not abuse. Once there is an opening, the moisture and rust will keep finding ways to spread underneath. Hi-hat rod is kind of a dull rust color now. Lugs were easy to clean up because they hadn't seen a lot of friction on the chrome. This may not be an issue in L.A.. Climate control is a must for me now, but it unfortunately was not always an option.
 

Sequimite

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We have a little over two acres so my drum shed is an insulated stainless steel forty foot cargo container which is hidden behind some trees. It was $5000, and no doubt they are more expensive at the moment, but they are so tight and well insulated that humidity does not penetrate and an under desk heater keeps the 300 square feet toasty warm all winter.

I would like to build a 12 x 16 wood shed for band practice.
 

Pat A Flafla

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When I visit LA from TX, I wonder how y'all can live somewhere so hot. That said, I wouldn't store good drums in a shed in TX without some sort of temperature control.
Wait, do you mean LA or L.A.? Whatever, they're both hot, but I wouldn't visit L.A. on purpose so I'm not sure if it's hotter than LA.
 

owr

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I'm up the coast from you in Santa Cruz, here in CA we definitely got an edge up on this because of the moderate weather. I wouldn't do what I do here if I still lived in New England.

I have a small detached studio, about 8' x 10' inside. I lucked out in that I had an existing structure that was a bit more than a shed, fully framed on a concrete slab with roof, but all the walls had dry rot and needed to be torn out. We fully built it up room within a room with new framing on the inside, I likely over spent in hindsight but it did probably cost around $25K.

My room is probably around 80-90% sound proof (just pulling numbers out, not based on decibels). Neighbors close by say they can hear my bass drum a bit but it doesn't keep them from falling asleep at night. No cymbals or snare or keyboards or anything seem to bother them once they are actually in their homes, so I can play pretty late.

Due to all the sound proofing, I have no windows in the structure and only added an exhaust fan for outtake and a passive vent for intake. I debated for a long time a split system air-conditioner but that alone with installation was going to be a lot. It just doesn't get that hot up here and I run very limited amps/electronics inside. If you plan on using a window mounted AC its probably best not to bother with any attempts at sound proofing, because that will just kill it. Depending on your needs that can be a bad thing or liberating.

A benefit though of all the insulation and such is that it keeps temperatures in there very well controlled. Temperatures up here are pretty moderate to begin with, but the room generally stays between 50 - 70 degrees (F). I keep my nice drums in there and haven't had any issues over the 3 years or so I've had it.

What did become an issue for me is humidity. We have very wet winters, and for awhile I was running the exhaust fan on low at all times to keep some circulation. It was pulling in the night foggy air (we're very close to the coast) and after one really wet stretch I noticed some mildew on some foam. I got very paranoid over this because if I get mold in between the walls Im screwed, so stopped running the fan overnight and put in a portable dehumidifier. This takes care of the humidity no problem, but the heat from running that thing brought the temperatures inside up to 80 degrees, even before I came in.

These days I just keep a temperature and humidity meter in the room that records a history of highs/lows so I can see the swings. I only put the exhaust fan on when I'm in the room (so I don't suffocate!) and only run the humidifier generally in the late fall/winter. Humidity crept up in there a few days ago so I just ran it overnight for one night, you can feel the difference in the air noticeably. As fall/winter progresses I'll need to get a bit more active with this, but its a pretty easy balance to run these days. I should add that I'm almost always in there at night for an hour or two, always alone, and never running more than one keyboard amp. I wouldn't recommend trying to rehearse in there with a band, dont really have the room for it.

Last advice - though this is a whole other topic and there are lots of threads. In a small room the acoustics will be terrible. A metal snare drum will take your head off. I've had to put in a ton of sound treatment on all the walls and ceilings. Its better and fine for practice and I can get some pretty good recordings in there, but I'd never dream of critical listening or mixing, the physics are just working against you.

Good luck!
 

XDrums

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Seems like a waste of money just to store and or play your drums? Even drums stored in the garage get rust if it’s not climate controlled. I bought a 90s pearl Session Kit a few months ago and the dude played it in the garage. Nice Kit but petina for sure. Myself I hate any rust on anything. Why spend the money on nice gear when you let it go anyway by keeping it in a sheshed or garage?
 

Corbin L Douthitt

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I am looking at possibilities of having a nice small/medium size shed in the backyard where I can comfortably setup my drums and play. I am sure I need to use sound absorbing material and do anything else I can to reduce db levels outside so I don’t annoy the neighbors. BUT my question is, does it make sense to do it? Has anyone tried? I am in LA, so it is mostly dry but the shed won’t be temperature controlled, any ideas?.
LOCATION. LOCATION.LOCATION. What is your climate like? I see LA area.. you aren't subject to big temperature swings- freeze thaw heat.. As long as it is insulated to maintain a fairly consistent temp range, you should be ok. preferably it would have AC/Heat- like a temp controlled storage unit.
 

DanRH

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Agreed on location. I’ve had my shed for over seven years in the Bay Area and never had a rust issue. I have a working Hammond organ and Leslie in mind with my kit. No issues. At all.
 

cruddola

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I thought about it myself until I returned to Southern Arizona. Not happening with the 120-plus degree summers. Our summers are from early April to late October. 90's to 126 degrees during that time. We don't have winters. We got Spring and Summers, that's it. I'd have to build a structure way beyond a shed. No thanks. My solution, since I've never been married or ever fathered a kid, was to turn my living room into my drum room. I'm in the middle of a CoVid-delayed home renovation doing just that after a year in retirement. Work sucks! I've decided the 16X21 foot master bed room will be the living room. It'll get the big-screen, stereo, full size frig, snack cabinet, couch, recliners, coffee table and four end tables instead. Second bedroom I sleep in. Third bed room my brother sleeps in. Fourth and smallest bedroom becomes my photo and video editing suite. Living room-turned drum room gets my library, my brother's keyboards, guitar & amps gear, a 3X4 foot reading table, two killer comfort chairs, two comfortable dental stools on casters, recording gear on wheeled rack-mounted cabinets, recording monitors with larger hanging monitors, and the stinking drums. Nothing else. I thank the Great Pumpkin I chose my gear and freedom over any wife and kids.
 

OldSticks

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In my experience, sound absorbing materials reduce noise and volume INSIDE the room/shed. reducing volume OUTSIDE the room/shed requires mass (brick, block, several layers of sheetrock), and no openings. We had neighbors attached on each side. We lined the walls and ceiling with 3 layers of 5/8" sheetrock. No need to "finish" the sheetrock, but stagger the sheets so the edges don't line-up. Door and windows need to be covered and well sealed. NO complaints from neighbors, even when they were in the adjacent basements (wee played fairly loud. In fact we played too loud). If you have a furnace or AC with ducts, they need to be excluded (covered), or they will carry the sound throughout the structure and OUT through the floor level room's walls and windows. We covered the bottoms and sides of ducts, which eliminated ventilation while we played. We opened doors and windows when not playing.
Changes in temp and humidity. in a shed or garage, can rust your chrome. It rusted mine!
I'm certain about the sound reduction, because of my experience. But I believe several members work in recording. I think they'll agree with me. If they don't agree, follow their advice. (they should know better than I do). Once we lined an entire basement with sheet foam and a double layer of cardboard egg cartons, sure we'd solved the problem. There was no perceived reduction of volume outside the house. Much love, JM "Old sticks", and ROCK THAT SHED!.
 


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