Are there any video's or sound files showing the sound difference between a 45 and 30 degree bearing

Drum Play

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I've been searching youtube for a video that has sounds files of 45 degree bearing edges vs 30 degree bearing edges.
 

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I doubt that one in ten drum experts could notice the difference in sound if identical drums (with the exception of the bearing edge angle) were placed side by side.
 

JazzDrumGuy

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Not sure but if you check YT, there are numerous before and after vids of various edges so you can see what the hoopla is all about.....
 

Hanover Fiste

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There is no difference. Once the bearing edge isn't in contact with the head, the angle at which it departs can't possibly make a difference to the sohnd of a drum. The outside profile/amount of round-over is the important part.
 

anthony marquart

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Interesting video. First time seeing it. I have started putting round over 45s top and dual 45s to a point on bottom about 6 months ago.
 

PerfectImposter

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bigbonzo said:
^^^ So, why do drum makers make drums with different angles? ^^^
Marketing? Who knows. There's very little scientific basis for most drum and hardware designs. I'd be very surprised if any of the major drum companies have anybody on the payroll that understands even high school level physics.
 

rondrums51

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Hanover Fiste said:
There is no difference. Once the bearing edge isn't in contact with the head, the angle at which it departs can't possibly make a difference to the sohnd of a drum. The outside profile/amount of round-over is the important part.
Absolutely right. When people talk about 45 or 30 degree bearing edges, it means nothing. What matters is what ply its beveled on, and whether its round or sharp.
 

Hanover Fiste

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bigbonzo said:
^^^ So, why do drum makers make drums with different angles? ^^^
Because, aside from the round badge era drums, that's the way Gretsch has always done it (30) and for marketing purposes, they're not about to change how they do things. That way you, the consumer, know that old school Gretsch wholesome goodness is baked right in.
 

xsabers

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Hanover Fiste said:
There is no difference. Once the bearing edge isn't in contact with the head, the angle at which it departs can't possibly make a difference to the sohnd of a drum. The outside profile/amount of round-over is the important part.
If, in a perfect environment, each edge was sharpened to its finest point where a single molecule was contacting the head, and the head was more rigid than glass, I would agree. However, a 45 degree cut will be sharper than a 30 degree, and the head will flex somewhat creating contact over a larger area on the 30 degree edge. The difference, like most, will be subtle, not completely unlike the difference between the sound a fretted instrument makes when plucked vs. a fretless, albeit to a lesser degree. As far as rounded vs. 45, the difference can be significant on toms. I can't speak for snares.
 

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I remember having a Dub 45edge put on the snare side and complete roundover on batter,the drum smoked!
Great articulation and punch.
Eventually, I'm getting it back in a trade.
 

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rondrums51 said:
There is no difference. Once the bearing edge isn't in contact with the head, the angle at which it departs can't possibly make a difference to the sohnd of a drum. The outside profile/amount of round-over is the important part.
Absolutely right. When people talk about 45 or 30 degree bearing edges, it means nothing. What matters is what ply its beveled on, and whether its round or sharp.
+.....in both cases, 45 /45 or 30 /45 the result is a pointed contact area and is usually placed over the center ply. There is another scenario using a single 45 pointed on the outer ply or , rarely, on the inner ply.

It doesn't appear significant, but when you calculate the area of the circle created there is a measurable difference. How much of this is marketing and how much is actual acoustics is certainly debatable. I have to say that on most things drum related, I just trust my ear regardless of the hype..
 

rondrums51

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gwbasley said:
There is no difference. Once the bearing edge isn't in contact with the head, the angle at which it departs can't possibly make a difference to the sohnd of a drum. The outside profile/amount of round-over is the important part.
Absolutely right. When people talk about 45 or 30 degree bearing edges, it means nothing. What matters is what ply its beveled on, and whether its round or sharp.
+.....in both cases, 45 /45 or 30 /45 the result is a pointed contact area and is usually placed over the center ply. There is another scenario using a single 45 pointed on the outer ply or , rarely, on the inner ply.

It doesn't appear significant, but when you calculate the area of the circle created there is a measurable difference. How much of this is marketing and how much is actual acoustics is certainly debatable. I have to say that on most things drum related, I just trust my ear regardless of the hype..


Me, too. It either sounds good or it doesn't.

Several years ago, I had Precision Drum build me a 4 X 14 snare, and I wanted a vintage "Gretsch" type sound. They recommended a "vintage" bearing edge, 30 degrees with a rounded shape. It worked well. But the actual angle of the bearing edge had very little to do with it. It was the roundover, which stimulates more shell response.
 

gwbasley

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Threads like this one often beg the question "Why do you ask?" There are so many specifics that can alter the answer, like "is it a snare, tom, bass drum?...what are you trying to accomplish?...shell construction?...etc. Without those qualifications the replies form a shotgun pattern which may only confuse the issue.

So for the OP...please tell us more so we can give you a proper response.
 

LFBarfe

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Hanover Fiste said:
^^^ So, why do drum makers make drums with different angles? ^^^
Because, aside from the round badge era drums, that's the way Gretsch has always done it (30) and for marketing purposes, they're not about to change how they do things. That way you, the consumer, know that old school Gretsch wholesome goodness is baked right in.
I've got SSB Gretsch toms with almost no discernible inner cut, just an outside roundover. They sound fine with my 30 degree ones when played together. With Gretsch, the die cast hoops are the key to 'the' sound, IMHO.
 

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bigbonzo said:
^^^ So, why do drum makers make drums with different angles? ^^^
HYPE. They can also claim that their edges are gluten free and use no artificial additives. We've had many discussions here about the great vintage drum shells from the mid 20th century. If memory serves me correctly, most drummers had no idea about how many plies or which types of wood plies were used in the drums they wanted. It's the old "Rich Corinthian Leather" hype game. Do the drums sound good to you? Yes or no irrespective of the angle of the bearing edges.
 

Markkuliini

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W&A Player said:
^^^ So, why do drum makers make drums with different angles? ^^^
HYPE. They can also claim that their edges are gluten free and use no artificial additives. We've had many discussions here about the great vintage drum shells from the mid 20th century. If memory serves me correctly, most drummers had no idea about how many plies or which types of wood plies were used in the drums they wanted. It's the old "Rich Corinthian Leather" hype game. Do the drums sound good to you? Yes or no irrespective of the angle of the bearing edges.
I agree that the actual angle of the cut doesn't matter to the sound .
But I have to say that many other small things do, and while drummers back in the day maybe didn't care so much about ply counts or material etc, I bet they knew what sounded good and what didn't. And I don't think that we can really say that they didn't care about the details, because it was more so that the companies simply did not share those details and the information did not spread as easily as nowadays. Drummers had no other choice. A good example of a "minor" change in production (that company did as a cost saving procedure, and kept it a secret) was Ludwig changing the Supra's base material from brass to aluminum in the early 60's. Those 2 versions sound very different to me, and I'm sure that many drummers noticed it when the change was made. They may have not cared about the details, but I'm sure they cared about the consequence.

My point, like you kind of said it too, is that the not-caring-about-details-attitude was not by choice.
 

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Hanover Fiste said:
There is no difference. Once the bearing edge isn't in contact with the head, the angle at which it departs can't possibly make a difference to the sohnd of a drum. The outside profile/amount of round-over is the important part.
Logically, I agree but practically I don't agree. The reason it matters is because the inside angle cut determines the amount of mass of the outside profile. If you take a two identical shells and cut a 45 on one and a 30 on the other, the 30 outside profile will have more mass.
 

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Olderschool said:
There is no difference. Once the bearing edge isn't in contact with the head, the angle at which it departs can't possibly make a difference to the sohnd of a drum. The outside profile/amount of round-over is the important part.
Logically, I agree but practically I don't agree. The reason it matters is because the inside angle cut determines the amount of mass of the outside profile. If you take a two identical shells and cut a 45 on one and a 30 on the other, the 30 outside profile will have more mass.
Ok, let's take 2 identical drums, one with a 30 inside cut and the other with a 45 cut, and you can do a blindfolded A/B test to see how much difference to the sound of a drum a few grams makes. The slight inconsistencies between drumheads and the mass and grain structure of the shells would almost certainly trump the effect of a tiny bit more/less wood on the bearing edges.
 


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