Asking opinions on an early slide technique

Devourly

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Hey everyone, I'm new to the forum and I was hoping I could get some feedback on my technique. I recently started playing again after a nearly decade long hiatus. I fell back into the groove and feel of playing drums easily enough, but my bass drum work is definitely my weakest aspect.

When I played back in high school, I used to be pretty quick. I could play short bursts at high speeds. I always had the problem of leaning forward if I tried to go any longer and I'd lose my balance. So now I'm trying to put the same level of attention to drumming as I did to guitar. I'd like to learn how to do some long double bass runs. I also want to get reacquainted with the ability to throw in quick flams around a beat. The type of music I'd like to play is probably similar to Avenged Sevenfold from the White Album to Nightmare. Nothing absolutely crazy like 250 tempos playing 16ths. Just be able to play moderately metal drums with a punk attitude. Best way I can think to describe it. Some double bass runs at no more than 160 ish probably, and some double fills and flams. The chorus for the song Nightmare is 16ths at 130 bpm I think. Steady groove. That's my goal for now. Being able to push to 160 ish.

This is a quick video of my early slide technique.

I realized that years ago, I used to play doubles in a similar way. The same way you slide to achieve two hits, I was simply keeping my foot in the same spot. I could feel the rebound of the pedal, the cycle of motion. Starting with my toe on the pedal, I lifted off the pedal then I would snap my toe down and then replant my toe in the starting position. You have to time the cycle right but you can get two hits pretty effortlessly. However, I would fatigue fairly easily leading me to think there's a more efficient way.

I've never found the technique I described talked about anywhere. The closest I ever saw was the slide technique. So I was probably doing a poor version of slide.

So first off, my slide is only a couple days old. Does it look correct? Am I doing anything obviously wrong? And I have a sneaking suspicion that I wouldn't actually need to use slide doubles until I reach a certain speed tempo-wise. I feel like for most of the speeds I'm talking about, I'd probably just be using heel up singles. Is that right? I really feel like you shouldn't need double strokes to play 16ths at 130. But maybe there's some benefit to it?

Thanks for taking the time!

Edit: Also, what's your opinion of the DW 3000? I've had it for about 16 years and its the only double kick I've ever used. Its time for a replacement most likely, is there a specific pedal that ought to serve my needs well?
 

Beefsurgeon

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Hi, welcome!

It looks like you've got a lot of tension in your foot (maybe both feet since the left beater is buried in the head too). Tension leads to fatigue, always.

This tension often occurs if you aren't balanced on the throne. You're putting weight on your feet to balance yourself, and the effort of supporting that weight introduces tension.

Focus on supporting your weight with your core, then it will be much easier to develop finesse with your feet.

James Payne has some pretty good explanations and exercises for this:
 

Devourly

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Looking at the video I see what you mean. My whole ankle and calf along with most of my foot does look very tense. So first thing to focus on would be relaxing myself. I think I saw that video a long time ago but forgot it existed. I'm definitely gonna have a look at this again. Thanks!

I imagine forcing myself to relax is gonna slow me down even further. But I guess this is a good thing? To further cement the relationship between foot and pedal you'd want to be slow and attentive
 

Beefsurgeon

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I imagine forcing myself to relax is gonna slow me down even further. But I guess this is a good thing? To further cement the relationship between foot and pedal you'd want to be slow and attentive
It is a good thing, because it's an investment pays dividends. As you refine your mechanics, it takes less and less effort to play faster and faster. It took me way too long to realize that drumming technique is more of a physics problem than a physical fitness challenge!
 

Devourly

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That's an interesting way to think of it. More of a physics problem.

Are there any foot techniques like the one I described? Or do you think I was unconsciously doing a poor imitation of the slide, without the slide? It just makes me wonder if there's real reason for the slide to be there or if you can get away without it. Thinking from an economy of motion mindset.
 

Hypercaffium

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Plenty of good suggestions here! I'm a noob, I play since 5 months approximately, but I spent quite some time on bass drum technique recently. Maybe I can give you my advice and also learn something from you guys.
From what I see, your technique is definitely a slide. It's not bad, I just see some tension in your foot both when you bury the beater and also when you do the first hit. If you want to stick to the slide technique, just follow the suggestions here: relax, don't overthink it and it wil come sooner or later.
Since you want to do long runs and keep your balance, my suggestion is to try the heel toe techniquem which I prefer for a number of reasons but mainly because my foot always stay in the same place and doesn't move at all.
 


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