AVH Drumming on “Jump” Solo

High on Stress

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AVH mentioned in an old MD interview that he’ll listen to another drummer and play a bit like them. During the 1984 era and in particularly on Jump, I detect a Bozzio phase in his playing ... the Roto toms and his playing during that guitar solo section: displaced backbeats, accents on the bell of the ride, and the bass drum work. All remind me of Terry Bozzio.

Perhaps coincidentally, or maybe not, one of the other drummers he mentioned in that interview was Steve Smith, who also copped (and acknowledged) a Bozzio-like approach on Don’t Stop Believing.
 

wflkurt

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I have been a huge VH fan since I was introduced to them at age 11 in 1982. Alex is my childhood drumming hero and my first VH concert was Aug 12th 1986 at the Worcester Centrum. As much as I begged to go see the 1984 tour, I was only 13 and the Centrum was an hour and forty five minutes away.

I'm probably one of the few rare people that actually liked the Simmons sounds that Alex used. The 5150 set with the Simmons sounded amazing live and those low Simmons toms hit me straight in the chest. I actually saved up my summer job money in 1988 and bought myself an SDS 1000 which I still have.

The sounds Alex used on 1984 were from a mix of Simmons floor toms and bass drums(run through an SDS-V), roto toms, Paiste cymbals and a 6.5x14 Tama rosewood snare drum. Though it's been argued to death I'm pretty sure Alex did the HFT intro without any overdubs. During his solo on the 1984 tour he goes into his solo from out of HFT and he does the same thing as the intro. It sounds just like the record. I do know that they did some cymbal overdubs when the made the album though on various songs. Back then the studio(5150) was very small as it was converted to a studio from a racquetball court. All the instruments had to be recorded in the same room, which made things difficult. After recording OU812(1988) and completing the tour, VH took time off and Eddie expanded the studio adding a much needed drum room. The F**K album(1991) was the first album recorded there utilizing the new drum room.
 

VintageUSA

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I have read that AVH triggered Simmons drum sounds on 1984 (except his snare) and for a time thereafter, and the octabans on the touring kit were in front of Simmons pads and mostly there for visual effect.
Correct -- when I saw that tour, Alex was playing an acoustic snare, basses, and, of course, cymbals.
All the toms were etoms and the basses sounded triggered as well.
 

dangermoney

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He's on fire!

Which finally explains the extinguisher.
I saw VH on their VH II tour. AVH put on a gas mask and lit his drum heads on fire during his drum solo. At the end of his solo, the roadies came out and extinguished what little was left. His extinguishers might have been for looks or they might have been required by fire code lol ...
 

Vistalite Black

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AVH mentioned in an old MD interview that he’ll listen to another drummer and play a bit like them. During the 1984 era and in particularly on Jump, I detect a Bozzio phase in his playing ... the Roto toms and his playing during that guitar solo section: displaced backbeats, accents on the bell of the ride, and the bass drum work. All remind me of Terry Bozzio.

Perhaps coincidentally, or maybe not, one of the other drummers he mentioned in that interview was Steve Smith, who also copped (and acknowledged) a Bozzio-like approach on Don’t Stop Believing.
You think Alex Van Halen and his band were influenced by Missing Persons (with its only gold record in 1982)?. Really? Any other outlandish theories you’d like to share with us?
 

JazzDrumGuy

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1984 was my first exposure to VH. I remember borrowing the cassette from my buddy (as well as Billy Idol, Scorpions, Ratt, Motley Crue, etc!). I thought it was awesome. As I got older, I was introduced to early VH and VH I is still one of my favorite rock albums.

Hearing the raw track that Vista posted above was crazy - I never thought Jump had such an odd time over the guitar solo. I've normally just jammed to the guitar solo when listening to it and didn't really ever play drums to it (except air drums!) ......pretty crazy, original stuff!

I've also wondered about that metallic snare sound. It's got a funky ring to it and I was shocked it was a rosewood snare and not metal? I saw Van Hagar in the late 90's and the band was amazing......they were tight and the entire band was on fire. Michael was loaded, of course, but it was great to finally see the band on stage after years of growing up seeing them and their antics on MTV. Of course, Sammy is no David Lee, but still it was good.......
 

Tornado

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You think Alex Van Halen and his band were influenced by Missing Persons (with its only gold record in 1982)?. Really? Any other outlandish theories you’d like to share with us?
Yeah, no way Alex ever heard Terry playing with Zappa in the 70s. I mean, he was blowing everyone else's mind, but not Alex.
 

dsop

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AVH mentioned in an old MD interview that he’ll listen to another drummer and play a bit like them. During the 1984 era and in particularly on Jump, I detect a Bozzio phase in his playing ... the Roto toms and his playing during that guitar solo section: displaced backbeats, accents on the bell of the ride, and the bass drum work. All remind me of Terry Bozzio.

Perhaps coincidentally, or maybe not, one of the other drummers he mentioned in that interview was Steve Smith, who also copped (and acknowledged) a Bozzio-like approach on Don’t Stop Believing.
When Bozzio's new concept was unleashed (via UK and then Missing Persons and then the instructional video and clinic tour), everybody was influenced. Suddenly you saw drummers everywhere with two china cymbals mounted up high, usually with small cymbals stacked inside them. And the whole linear groove thing with the cymbal bell, stacked cymbals, etc.
 

Frank Godiva

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1984 my first concert, still not a big fan of the topic tune; stop playing keyboards Ed and stick to guitar runs through my head
 
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When Bozzio's new concept was unleashed (via UK and then Missing Persons and then the instructional video and clinic tour), everybody was influenced. Suddenly you saw drummers everywhere with two china cymbals mounted up high, usually with small cymbals stacked inside them. And the whole linear groove thing with the cymbal bell, stacked cymbals, etc.
Don't forget Group 87, that's where Steve Smith got the inspiration for "Don't Stop Believing."

You think Alex Van Halen and his band were influenced by Missing Persons (with its only gold record in 1982)?. Really? Any other outlandish theories you’d like to share with us?
Mr. VB,
Outlandish??? Open your mind up a bit. Dave has clearly stated that his biggest "musical influences" are dance (and disco) music (imagine that?) So to think that Al couldn't be aware of someone like Bozzio is an outlandish statement unto itself. Not to mention that both bands also played the US Festival which was 1982ish (not sure the exact date.) And... Roth and Dale Bozzio shared the same wardrobe designers as well (ha!)

GREAT musicians are very open minded (and eared) creatures.

I just heard Grohl call ABBA some of the greatest pop music ever. I was hanging with Jason Bittner (drummer for Shadows Fall) once and I asked him what music he had been listening to. He said, "I'm obsessed with The Jam, I NEVER listen to metal."

Look outside of your "comfort zone" you never know what might happen.

Back to the original subject, Alex says that he and Ed used to track stuff (jam) together just gtr and drums, and he would just follow what Ed was playing. If they got something cool they would later lay down bass and rhythm guitar tracks to Ed and Al playing alone. With that in mind, I don't doubt that the brothers could lay some stuff down with some dropped beats, and over the bar-beat phrasing (like we hear on "Jump.") This could also be where some of Ed's alcohol induced BS that he played many of the bass parts because Mike couldn't, (or something like that) came from.

Those two together could be down right funky!!!! "Drop Dead Legs," "Little Guitars," whew!!!! I just hope that BOTH of them start taking care of themselves so we can continue to listen to their greatness for a long time.

And since others mentioned seeing VH live, I will too. I've seen them 4 or 5 times: Fair Warning tour, Diver Down tour, 1984, 5150, and either the For Unlawful... or Balance tours. Maybe both, I forget.

MSG
 
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Toast Tee

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Awesome post!
Alex was/is a studio genius. His drum parts fit the tunes perfectly, and they're super creative. (Plus, gotta love that cymbal/drum sound too)
I remember when I was studying, I was given the sheet music to....geez, I think it was VHagar's first album? The tune was Finish what you started (or something) Dam, every bar changed, besides the chorus
Learning that song via chart was the perfect choice, and improved my reading emensly. I know Ed gets all the credit from the non drumming community, but imo Alex was every bit as good, and important to the band.
Idk if VH could have topped 1984? Even David had a successful solo album. Still I wonder how good the following material would have been if they didn't part?
Alex doesn't get enough credit as a drummer. Great sound, great chops, creative...just brilliant!
 

What It Is

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Summer of '79, I'm 12/13 years old and Dance the Night Away was all I heard on the radio. Opened the door for AVH and VH for me. Loved the MD issues with Al's newest drum set configuration, and definitely went down the AVH internet rabbit hole reliving those great sets and where he's at today. Never realized how low he sits at his drums. A great player and showman.
 

wflkurt

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Just because VH has a few pop tunes doesn't mean Alex wasn't influenced by guys like Bozzio. In fact VH(back when they were known as Mammoth with Eddie singing lead) was doing all kinds of crazy stuff as Ed and Al were heavily influenced by progressive musicians. They probably would have followed that direction if it were not for DLR when he joined VH in 1973. It was Dave's idea to name the band VH and it was Dave that got the brothers to think more top 40, learn top 40 tunes and get them to write dance-able music as Roth had a long term vision for the band. He may not be performing all that great now but you have to give him a ton of credit for getting VH exposed to the world. If it were not for his drive and ambition nobody would have probably ever heard of VH outside of southern California. Alex and Eddie spent countless hours jamming together and the Hot For teacher beat was taken directly from Billy Cobham.
 

EvEnStEvEn

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Lol, these kids don't even know who DLR is - but he appears to have an EDM hit on his hands.

"Jump" for a new generation....

 

DrummerJustLikeDad

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Just because VH has a few pop tunes doesn't mean Alex wasn't influenced by guys like Bozzio. In fact VH(back when they were known as Mammoth with Eddie singing lead) was doing all kinds of crazy stuff as Ed and Al were heavily influenced by progressive musicians.
As far as Prog influence on the brothers goes, it’s at least a matter of record that Eddie was influenced by Steve Hackett. Steve says Eddie has credited him for his tapping technique.
 

Mcjnic

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Lol, these kids don't even know who DLR is - but he appears to have an EDM hit on his hands.

"Jump" for a new generation....

Oh ... I ... it’s ... that ... ... ... what?

... sad ...

No words ...

................
 


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