AVH Drumming on “Jump” Solo

Vistalite Black

Ludwigs in the Basement
Joined
Feb 17, 2015
Messages
2,735
Reaction score
575
Location
North Carolina
Just because VH has a few pop tunes doesn't mean Alex wasn't influenced by guys like Bozzio. In fact VH(back when they were known as Mammoth with Eddie singing lead) was doing all kinds of crazy stuff as Ed and Al were heavily influenced by progressive musicians. They probably would have followed that direction if it were not for DLR when he joined VH in 1973. It was Dave's idea to name the band VH and it was Dave that got the brothers to think more top 40, learn top 40 tunes and get them to write dance-able music as Roth had a long term vision for the band. He may not be performing all that great now but you have to give him a ton of credit for getting VH exposed to the world. If it were not for his drive and ambition nobody would have probably ever heard of VH outside of southern California. Alex and Eddie spent countless hours jamming together and the Hot For teacher beat was taken directly from Billy Cobham.
I feel a bit like the guy in the movie "Yesterday," with the one guy in the world who remembers The Beatles. Difference is that many of you seem to have forgotten how desperately silly Missing Persons was -- on every level, including drums.
Here's a reminder:
 

wflkurt

Deafus Maximus
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
9,023
Reaction score
193
Location
Chichester NH
I'm pretty sure this didn't have a huge influence on Alex but I'm sure some of Terry's earlier playing did. I also did mention how Dave was a really motivated guy that most undoubtedly got VH noticed. That was 40 years ago though. The Dave of today is kind of a joke now and that EDM stuff is just ridiculous. Here is a great video of Dave in Las Vegas. Apparently he had a room near some young kids and heard classic VH blaring from the room. When he stopped by to say hello the kids didn't recognize him and kept apologizing saying they would keep the noise down. Those dumb kids had no clue who they were talking to!

 

xsabers

World's Second Most Okayest Drummer
Joined
Mar 4, 2010
Messages
10,637
Reaction score
1,567
I feel a bit like the guy in the movie "Yesterday," with the one guy in the world who remembers The Beatles. Difference is that many of you seem to have forgotten how desperately silly Missing Persons was -- on every level, including drums.
Here's a reminder:
Most drummers I knew were impressed and influenced by TB long before there was a Missing Persons. TB was an Icon way before New Wave.
 

Hop

DFO Veteran
Joined
Feb 11, 2012
Messages
1,743
Reaction score
275
Location
L.A., CA
I feel a bit like the guy in the movie "Yesterday," with the one guy in the world who remembers The Beatles. Difference is that many of you seem to have forgotten how desperately silly Missing Persons was -- on every level, including drums.
Here's a reminder:
Why are you trying to tie Bozzio just to that singular point in his extensive career?
The guy was very well known in the music scene in the 70's before Van Halen broke out.
Don't forget that Bozzio did a stint in UK using a Rototom kit - late 70's vs. AVH using them in the early 80's.

TB_UK_rototoms.JPG



AVH_rototoms_2.JPG
 

Toast Tee

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2019
Messages
530
Reaction score
131
Just because VH has a few pop tunes doesn't mean Alex wasn't influenced by guys like Bozzio. In fact VH(back when they were known as Mammoth with Eddie singing lead) was doing all kinds of crazy stuff as Ed and Al were heavily influenced by progressive musicians. They probably would have followed that direction if it were not for DLR when he joined VH in 1973. It was Dave's idea to name the band VH and it was Dave that got the brothers to think more top 40, learn top 40 tunes and get them to write dance-able music as Roth had a long term vision for the band. He may not be performing all that great now but you have to give him a ton of credit for getting VH exposed to the world. If it were not for his drive and ambition nobody would have probably ever heard of VH outside of southern California. Alex and Eddie spent countless hours jamming together and the Hot For teacher beat was taken directly from Billy Cobham.
imo, everyone since Bonzo has been influenced by him, weather they know it, or not.
 

dcrigger

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
5,072
Reaction score
1,122
Location
California
I feel a bit like the guy in the movie "Yesterday," with the one guy in the world who remembers The Beatles. Difference is that many of you seem to have forgotten how desperately silly Missing Persons was -- on every level, including drums.
Here's a reminder:
Nothing of the kind to forget... because at least in the circles I lived in, Missing Persons and Group 87 before it were certainly not considered "silly".

Of course, Dale's thing was quirky to say the least... and if we had been fans looking for our new "fav band" MP may not have had us ordering posters for our bedroom walls. But instead, we were musicians... and there was no question that through this period of Terry was often at the nexus of new directions in music. And his influence pops up on tons of other projects like for example, Van Halen.

This notion that musicians higher up the commercial food chain are not constantly searching for new influences seems ludicrous to me. Most players that I've met at this level listen to EVERYTHING - and broad listening, the opposite of the typical fan just listens to what they like at the moment - I would think it would be really difficult to create new music if all one did was listen to music that sounds exactly what you've already created.

Anyway Alex has a far more "typical" pro musician background than most believers in the rock press "garage band" cliche would suspect. His and Eddie's father was, according to Wikipedia, an accomplished jazz saxophonist and clarinet player. Both brothers were trained as classical pianist in their youth. And later, Alex took classes in music theory, scoring, composition and arranging at Pasadena City College for a short while. This is where he met David Lee Roth and Mike Anthony.

In other words, like so many artists and players, a biography that shows musical interest and training that falls far outside the commonly perceived requirements for the career he ended up having.
 

dcrigger

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
5,072
Reaction score
1,122
Location
California
imo, everyone since Bonzo has been influenced by him, weather they know it, or not.
Yeah... maybe... not so sure about that.

Don't get me wrong, I think what Alex did with Van Halen was great. But really influential... sure the band was, so by that extension, sure. And of course Eddie certainly was in world of guitar playing. But Alex... a major influence... sorry, don't really see it.

Again not saying many weren't "influenced" by the exposure he provided for what he passed forward. But as a root source? Of anything? Again, not to my ears. YMMV
 

Mongrel

DFO Veteran
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
1,811
Reaction score
764
Location
South Jersey, USA
Yeah... maybe... not so sure about that.

Don't get me wrong, I think what Alex did with Van Halen was great. But really influential... sure the band was, so by that extension, sure. And of course Eddie certainly was in world of guitar playing. But Alex... a major influence... sorry, don't really see it.

Again not saying many weren't "influenced" by the exposure he provided for what he passed forward. But as a root source? Of anything? Again, not to my ears. YMMV
I have to agree with David, at least as far as my experience and recollection goes.

I was 15 when VH1 hit so I have a pretty good feel for it's initial impact. I had only been playing for two years at that point though, so not very saavy as far as Alex's skills one way or the other.

But.... VH was all about the guitar\s. Sure, the drums and bass were jamming but not *cuttng edge* like the guitar.... I mean, come on, "Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love"?!!!

I can cover the drums (lol...in my mind), but that freakin' GUITAR?! You could double your testerone just listening to it...

In time I remember Alex coming to some prominance, but not for those first few albums as far as I can recall.

What broke Alex wide open for me, and a lot of others I imagine, was "Hot For Teacher". Now THAT tune put Alex on the map... Freakin' awesome, just awesome.
 

Nacci

DFO Veteran
Joined
Jul 25, 2015
Messages
2,485
Reaction score
966
Location
Roxbury, NH.
Yeah... maybe... not so sure about that.

Don't get me wrong, I think what Alex did with Van Halen was great. But really influential... sure the band was, so by that extension, sure. And of course Eddie certainly was in world of guitar playing. But Alex... a major influence... sorry, don't really see it.

Again not saying many weren't "influenced" by the exposure he provided for what he passed forward. But as a root source? Of anything? Again, not to my ears. YMMV
Wasn’t Toast Tee talking about Bozzio?
 

Toast Tee

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2019
Messages
530
Reaction score
131
Yeah... maybe... not so sure about that.

Don't get me wrong, I think what Alex did with Van Halen was great. But really influential... sure the band was, so by that extension, sure. And of course Eddie certainly was in world of guitar playing. But Alex... a major influence... sorry, don't really see it.

Again not saying many weren't "influenced" by the exposure he provided for what he passed forward. But as a root source? Of anything? Again, not to my ears. YMMV
No, no. You got me wrong. I meant to say Boham.
I was just saying AVH studio work was brilliant. I had read that chart, and that was the first time I really came to appreciate his parts.
He had his own sound, but I wouldn't say every other drummer, or even may went for his sound, or even style.
 

Burps

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2017
Messages
141
Reaction score
46
Location
New England - USA
What was that VH album that had Gary Cherone on lead vocals that most people hated? I remember a co-worker, who hated the album, lending me that tape and I was shocked how complicated the music was. It was very difficult music. I think that was one reason (besides the screechy vocals) why it was disliked by many, since it was loaded with odd time signatures and it was hard to bob your head to.
 

Tmcfour

DFO Veteran
Joined
May 23, 2008
Messages
2,069
Reaction score
367
Location
Philadelphia
Too funny, I though EVH’s synth aged incredibly well. Did he and Geddy Lee introduce it right around the same time?

I really like the synth work on “I’ll Wait”. Also, AVH plays a relatively simple beat but just stumps you at the bridge.


It may be blasphemy but I think my second favorite VH song is "I'll Wait". Just a really well written song.
 

Tama CW

Very well Known Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2018
Messages
1,015
Reaction score
314
Location
SE Connecticut
I was 31 when I got my first programmable TV and MTV was on fire. Bands like VH with 1984 blew me away. That was great stuff, and AVH's contribution was significant. I recall reading nearly every Modern Drummer mag from around 1983 to 1992. And Alex was consistently placed in the top spot (or near it) for best drummer in their genre. It was always Buddy, Peart, AVH leading their individual genres. The drummer world was well aware of Alex's skills .
 

Bri6366

Very well Known Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2016
Messages
960
Reaction score
191
Location
Levittown, PA
Anyway Alex has a far more "typical" pro musician background than most believers in the rock press "garage band" cliche would suspect. His and Eddie's father was, according to Wikipedia, an accomplished jazz saxophonist and clarinet player. Both brothers were trained as classical pianist in their youth. And later, Alex took classes in music theory, scoring, composition and arranging at Pasadena City College for a short while. This is where he met David Lee Roth and Mike Anthony.

In other words, like so many artists and players, a biography that shows musical interest and training that falls far outside the commonly perceived requirements for the career he ended up having.

Roth and the Brothers were high school age when they met. Roth first saw Ed and Al play with their band Genesis at a Synagogue. They knew of Mike from
the local music scene, but never met until they were on the same bill at Pasadena High School and Van Halen blew their PA system during the sound check. Mike loaned his PA for the gig.
 

Bri6366

Very well Known Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2016
Messages
960
Reaction score
191
Location
Levittown, PA
Back in the late 70s, there was that gap when disco and soft rock were huge, Moon died, Zep would never tour again (I think their last Philly gig was '75), Aerosmith and Sabbath were burned out and Kiss was playing disco. Kids like me needed a new arena rock band to carry the torch and Van Halen was that band. By the early 80s, a lot of hard rock and metal bands were charting and some were around for years, but Van Halen really kicked the doors open.
 

dcrigger

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
5,072
Reaction score
1,122
Location
California
No, no. You got me wrong. I meant to say Boham.
I was just saying AVH studio work was brilliant. I had read that chart, and that was the first time I really came to appreciate his parts.
He had his own sound, but I wouldn't say every other drummer, or even may went for his sound, or even style.
Sorry - I just mis-read you. Not disagreeing about AVH at all.
 

dcrigger

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
5,072
Reaction score
1,122
Location
California
imo, everyone since Bonzo has been influenced by him, weather they know it, or not.
I think most people influenced by Bonham are aware of him...

....though know it or not - so many of them are unaware of how influenced they are by Carmine Appice

(Possibly my favorite "pot-stirring" topic to interject... maybe more like "kick the pot over") :cool:
 


Top