Back in the day, when I was cool...

BennyK

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Every stage of my life has had its joys , sorrows and the memories of events surrounding them .

Likewise , there's the music of each period in which I have an emotional attachment , regardless of the approval I may or may not have had from my peers .

I went from High School athlete to peacenik/hippy to disco boy to cowboy to jazz/blues cat and so on , but some of what I picked up along the way has become moreless permanent .

I was lucky enough to pry open the door of perception that slammed shut behind me and have a reasonably balanced view of where I'd come from and what I'd survived , profoundly agreeing with Duke Ellington that there are two types of music - good and bad . I allow people to decide for themselves which is which .

take it easy

 

Dumpy

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Every stage of my life has had its joys , sorrows and the memories of events surrounding them .

Likewise , there's the music of each period in which I have an emotional attachment , regardless of the approval I may or may not have had from my peers .

I went from High School athlete to peacenik/hippy to disco boy to cowboy to jazz/blues cat and so on , but some of what I picked up along the way has become moreless permanent .

I was lucky enough to pry open the door of perception that slammed shut behind me and have a reasonably balanced view of where I'd come from and what I'd survived , profoundly agreeing with Duke Ellington that there are two types of music - good and bad . I allow people to decide for themselves which is which .

take it easy

I appreciate and dig your perspective on this.
 

5 Style

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I used to over-analyze popular music. I used to make fun of everything that was popular and mainstream. I broadcast my sentiments loud enough for everyone to hear it, knowing full and well that it could easily be that I was putting excrement in one’s breakfast cereal. If I could convince people that my very exclusive music that I could only hear on the radio at 2:30 a.m. was so superior to the contemporary artist of the day, I was providing the world a public service.

Then I grew up. Half of that “music” I listened to I can’t tolerate anymore, let alone put it in my ears. Furthermore, I am appreciating why so many people enjoyed the artists that I went out of my way to degrade. I am realizing that because my music never amounted to more than a bunch of CD’s still in their jackets as I have run out of people to pawn them off to, some of my position was sheerly from jealousy. I could not be heard above the music that made people happy.

I have softened up a lot. Nearly dying does stuff like that to you. Beyond that, trying to make someone feel stupid for liking mainstream things is petty and evil. I feel bad for the way I treated people for liking the “trite” artists who made them feel good back in the day and even now.

When these list makers grow up, maybe they will realize the pettiness that shows through their work, and maybe work on something important like making the world a better place, instead of criticizing the only escape some people have from the world.
Ha! I've definitely been in the same boat for parts of my development... but I'll admit that I still am a bit like that. I still mostly enjoy music that most folks have never even heard of let alone heard and so much of what passes for popular just sounds like a soap commercial to me; it sounds like a commercial to sell itself and not much more. I have grown though in the fact that I've accepted that most folks have a much different relationship to music than I have and are more than happy to take in whatever may be popular at the moment... and rather than finding the music that's my favorites enlightening, they would probably see it as too challenging to deal with. The other difference between my then/now attitudes on music is that there are certain things that are very popular (and obviously commercial sounding) which I happen to really like: Steve Miller, pre-Thriller Micheal Jackson, the more commercial Bowie tracks (I've always liked his music but not always the commercial stuff, but I realize now that "Fame" is a brilliant song!)... I even dig that silly Nas X tune that came out last summer, Old Town Road...

Also, I wonder what are these CDs that you no longer like that you can't pawn off? It's probably a lot of stuff that I think is brilliant!
 

Dumpy

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Ha! I've definitely been in the same boat for parts of my development... but I'll admit that I still am a bit like that. I still mostly enjoy music that most folks have never even heard of let alone heard and so much of what passes for popular just sounds like a soap commercial to me; it sounds like a commercial to sell itself and not much more. I have grown though in the fact that I've accepted that most folks have a much different relationship to music than I have and are more than happy to take in whatever may be popular at the moment... and rather than finding the music that's my favorites enlightening, they would probably see it as too challenging to deal with. The other difference between my then/now attitudes on music is that there are certain things that are very popular (and obviously commercial sounding) which I happen to really like: Steve Miller, pre-Thriller Micheal Jackson, the more commercial Bowie tracks (I've always liked his music but not always the commercial stuff, but I realize now that "Fame" is a brilliant song!)... I even dig that silly Nas X tune that came out last summer, Old Town Road...

Also, I wonder what are these CDs that you no longer like that you can't pawn off? It's probably a lot of stuff that I think is brilliant!
Yes!

For me, it did become more acceptance than anything, and just letting myself like the stuff that is incredibly commercial. I found it was a “C’mon, Dumpy! You gotta admit that it’s actually pretty good!” I liken it to the Michelin Star chef admitting that McDonalds isn’t all that bad!

I still have discerning tastes, but have come to appreciate and even enjoy what is crassly commercial.

Hmmm. I would have to dig through my junk to find the CD collection LOL

Thanks for the kind words!
 

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

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Yes!

For me, it did become more acceptance than anything, and just letting myself like the stuff that is incredibly commercial. I found it was a “C’mon, Dumpy! You gotta admit that it’s actually pretty good!” I liken it to the Michelin Star chef admitting that McDonalds isn’t all that bad!

I still have discerning tastes, but have come to appreciate and even enjoy what is crassly commercial.

Hmmm. I would have to dig through my junk to find the CD collection LOL

Thanks for the kind words!
Been there as well...
On some level, I've always felt different from the majority when I was a kid. Coming from a small conformist place, the people sure went out of their way to tell me I was unequivocally different.
So, as I was growing up, I started embracing the outcast stereotype: listening to, and immersing myself completely in all sorts of non-mainstream fringe stuff. Up to a point where, in a reactionary move to assert said difference, I started ridiculing those "not educated/curious/bright/hip enough" to like anything that wasn't on TV or on the top 40 radio stations.

Well there was some bruised ego in there, and dishing out was really nothing more than trying to regain control of my little world by arbitrarily declaring that THEY were the ones not fitting in.
It's not all bad though, because the paradox of wanting to tell everyone to four letter word-off while longing for acceptance and approval is excellent creative fuel. The angst led me to write songs and gave me the drive to plow through the years of grinding as a starving artist.

But the truth is, even in my angry punk, early gangsta rap, french poet or whatever phases, I've always had pop sensibilities and I stubbornly passed on a lot of great music that I would only "get" many many years later. And a lot of what I was listening then hasn't aged well at all and no longer "speak" to me. Some of it, I still fondly revisit occasionaly.

I fully embrace my love for cheesy music now, and can spend a whole afternoon singing my heart out to some sappy pop tunes. Although I still, and probably always will, listen to a lot of bands no one has heard of. I still secretly and selfishly wish they don't make it big so that they continue to make me feel "in the know"... I guess I'll never be fully cured ;-)
 
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Dumpy

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Been there as well...
On some level, I've always felt different from the majority and when I was a kid. Coming from a small conformist place, the people sure went out of their way to tell me I was unequivocally different.
So, as I was growing up, I started embracing the outcast stereotype: listening to, and immersing myself completely in all sorts of non-mainstream fringe stuff. Up to a point where, in a reactionary move to assert said difference, I started ridiculing those "not educated/curious/bright/hip enough" to like anything that wasn't on TV or on the top 40 radio stations.

Well there was some bruised ego in there, and dishing out was really nothing more than trying to regain control of my little world by arbitrarily declaring that THEY were the ones not fitting in.
It's not all bad though, because the paradox of wanting tell everyone to four letter word-off while longing for acceptance and approval is excellent creative fuel. The angst led me to write songs and gave me the drive to plow through the years of grinding as a starving artist.

But the truth is, even in my angry punk, early gangsta rap, french poet or whatever phases, I've always had pop sensibilities and I stubbornly passed on a lot of great music that I would only "get" many many years later. And a lot of what I was listening then hasn't aged well at all and no longer "speak" to me. Some of it, I still revisit on occasion.occasion.

I fully embrace my love for cheesy music now, and can spend a whole afternoon singing my heart out to some sappy pop tunes. Although I still, and probably always will, listen to a lot of bands no one has heard of. I still secretly and selfishly wish they don't make it big so that they continue to make me feel "in the know"... I guess I'll never be fully cured ;-)
You touched on something in that first sentence. Yep- I experienced the same thing. I started dressing in all black, styling my hair in the most odd ways. My parents told me that my personal style was why I was being called an outcast. I replied that it was happening long before I changed my personal style; I may as well play the part.

I still listen to stuff nobody has heard of. I merely don’t feel superior about it any longer.

Thanks for sharing your experience!
 

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

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You touched on something in that first sentence. Yep- I experienced the same thing. I started dressing in all black, styling my hair in the most odd ways. My parents told me that my personal style was why I was being called an outcast. I replied that it was happening long before I changed my personal style; I may as well play the part.

I still listen to stuff nobody has heard of. I merely don’t feel superior about it any longer.

Thanks for sharing your experience!
My pleasure Dumpy, this is a honest and heartfelt thread that spoke to me. Thanks to you for opening that door. Geeking out on what drum head combo drummer ABC used on recording XYZ is a whole lot of fun, but threads like this one give DFO a human dimension that makes it into something more than just a "crowd-sourced drums google".
 

Rufus T Firefly

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Hey Dumpy, I remember back when I was in my 20s I was a bit of a prog rock snob. I remember one time making fun of some friends because they liked Dire Straits. Eventually I grew up and discovered that Dire Straits were an awesome group! I still listen to a lot of prog rock and I now also listen to Dire Straits and many others I overlooked in my youth. They say with age comes wisdom. Sometimes that’s true.
 

Dumpy

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Hey Dumpy, I remember back when I was in my 20s I was a bit of a prog rock snob. I remember one time making fun of some friends because they liked Dire Straits. Eventually I grew up and discovered that Dire Straits were an awesome group! I still listen to a lot of prog rock and I now also listen to Dire Straits and many others I overlooked in my youth. They say with age comes wisdom. Sometimes that’s true.
That bit of cool pride being stripped away does wonders, doesn’t it? I would still be making lists that provoked arguments had I not nearly been FORCED to sniff a few flowers!

Thanks for sharing your experience! I am truly overwhelmed by others sharing their experiences!
 

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I guess I was pretty fortunate living in NYC, my earliest music loves were Lifetime, Yes, Crimson, Hendrix and Santana. Hey 50 years later they still are in the mix!
 

Dumpy

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I guess I was pretty fortunate living in NYC, my earliest music loves were Lifetime, Yes, Crimson, Hendrix and Santana. Hey 50 years later they still are in the mix!

Nobody should feel inferior OR superior for liking those artists as they are quality through and through.

Those are great, and nobody should feel either superior OR inferior for liking them.
 

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

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The French know . Que sera sera

Some of my most touching and happiest memories are attached to that song. My grandpa and grandma would sing this together at every family diner, looking at each other like newlyweds. Certainly one of the greatest songs in all of the french repertoire.
 


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