Bands you used to love but, but not so much now.

Drm1979

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Anything on radio period. They have the same 5 songs on each station on repeat. I go straight to my ipod for music when I'm in my car.
 

Ptrick

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I sold some vintage gear to Stereolab....Tangerine Sparkle Gretsch 20,12,14 Set....Blue Sparkle Gretsch bongos...Ludwig wood tambourine....some old A’s....Mary and Andy stopped over to my house pre show once..and Mary got so wrapped up looking thru my 1,700 LPS..They were late to the gig!
Love Stereolab. I like “Soundust” when they recorded it all with real instruments.
 

cribbon

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I would agree with that. The first couple Chicago albums were great until they got to the sappy Peter Cetera ballad era then I lost interest.

Also the J. Geils band. The first couple of albums were killer funky blues. After the Bloodshot album the next couple of albums were just OK. After the Hotline album the rest of the albums sucked. They were more successful but had went commercial and was not the same band. I saw them live a few times before they went commercial and they were the best live band I had ever seen.
+ 1 on the J. Geils live thing. They were a killer live act up thru Bloodshot - Full House is an accurate representation of that. The first time I saw them live, they were the opening act for ELP on their debut US tour: From First I Look at the Purse to Take a Pebble - what a contrast that was!
 

Skinsmannn

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Queen's annoying flamboyance always rubbed me the wrong way .

Lou Reed's moments of brilliance got dimmer and dimmer

Doobie Bros painted themselves into a corner

The California gang - Browne , Taylor , CSNY just got silly .

The Dead resurrected themselves with two actual radio hits then headed back to the crypt.

Bowie took himself far too seriously after the Ziggy theatrics

Springsteen and Wenner , Wenner and Springsteen, anyway you slice it became a corporate mediocrity .

After Taylor , the Stones began spreading themselves pretty thin .

McCartney became a pale shadow of himself after Band on the Run . Lennon should have listened to his therapist(s). Imagine that .

Generally, anyone appearing on those PBS fundraisers are, to me, an embarrassing curiosity .

Jethro Tull ... what makes anybody think my sister WOULD marry him ?

Chicago - I have no words to describe this tragedy

OK, the only band I've ever been consistently been a dedicated follower of is/was the Kinks .
WELL SAID....well said. Nailed it.
 

MntnMan62

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When I was a teen I used to listen to The Grateful Dead. Even went to see them at the Meadowlands in 1978. But as I continued studying the drums and gained a greater appreciation for listening to skilled musicians who have mastered their instruments, I was less and less able to listen to them. I no longer will listen to them, at least I won't be the one to choose them on an ipod, album, streaming or otherwise. I'll merely bear them if someone else decides to play the Dead.
 

Pounder

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I was a big Keith Moon fan. So when he passed away I was still a Who fan, but angry at the band for keeping it going as I felt Moonie was a huge part of what made them great. I still think that. So I think my fandom took a hit with regards to that band, even though I have become a big Kenney Jones fan and Small Faces fan.

Another band, similar situation (in fact there's a few). James Gang with Joe Walsh was a favorite of mine. When Joe left, they weren't the same, although the album Bang with Tommy Bolin was still pretty good. An interesting tangent to the James Gang situation was Deep Purple. I thought they were amazing with Ian Gillian version II (?) but mark III with Coverdale and Glenn Hughes was still amazing but darker-sounding, more rough but still incredible. But by the time I saw them live they were in version IV with Blackmore replaced by, again, Tommy Bolin. I thought they were off a bit and felt the lack of Ritchie Blackmore negatively affected the band. That being said their album Come Taste The Band has in retrospect become one of my favorite hard rock albums BECAUSE it had Tommy Bolin. It was a fave when it came out too though because I was a serious Deep Purple fan. The best tunes on the album he's on are written by Tommy and they're the funkiest version of Deep Purple. Tommy was a natural talent but couldn't live out his drug addictions. His story is amazing because his playing on Billy Cobham's Spectrum album really puts that album into the stratosphere (pun intended). Billy Cobham got funkier over the years. So I thought he said pretty much everything he needed to with his album Spectrum and Tommy Bolin's crossover guitar playing is one reason why.

I still enjoyed Billy Cobham but felt he sorta became more fusion-y and this was a tad more boring as a listener, but still Cobham's studio playing is on several other artists' CTI records and he has an amazing pocket for Funk-Jazz.

Another example of a personnel change that negatively affect the band was Yes, when they lost Bill Bruford. They were sublime before that, but there were chinks in the armor with Alan White, even though the dude is amazing. And Going For The One is probably my current favorite Yes Album because of the music. I saw Yes during both the GFtO album tour and the "in the round" followup Tormato tour. But would I be sacrilegious to state that my favorite Alan White drumming is his drumming for John Lennon?

Anyway another band whose drummer change made me not as much of a fan is Journey, after Aynsley Dunbar, His playing on that album with Wheels In The Sky definitely puts Journey into the next level. Steve Smith was a great replacement though. Again, ironic or not, his playing on Jean Luc Ponty Enigmatic Ocean is my favorite Steve Smith playing. I never took that much of a shine to his later Vital Information music. Maybe I should explore it further.

Back to Aynsley Dunbar.. Jefferson Starship was a fave band of mine on their first couple of albums including Red Octopus. They had Jony Barbata on drums and I dug their loose organic sound with Marty Balin and also Papa John Creach on Violin. They had a very cool late-60s hippy vibe. Then on Freedom at Point Zero out goes Barbata, Balin and Creach, in comes Aynsley Dunbar on drums and Mickey Thomas. It was a more focused current power Pop/Rock band and they were great live.. Then drum machines came in and it got all watered down... I digress

Back to Small Faces... They were amazing with Marriot on vocals and with Rod but Rod was gonna leave and they became a shadow of their former selves, leaving Ron Wood to go to the Stones to replace Mick Taylor.. Some don't like Stones after Mick Taylor with Woody but I do. Where the Stones and I entered tentative times was when Bill Wyman quit. Anyone who believes Bill Wyman was replaceable is an idiot. And, again (only different) I'm a Darryl Jones fan. His playing with Sting is amazing. and with Miles Davis.

About Miles.. The guy changed styles about 4 times. His artistry and impact on the 20th century jazz and fusion history is undeniable. I don't care what period of time it is, (my favorite Miles is between Bitches Brew and his semi-retirement in mid70s) I love Miles. Only when he caved to Quincy Jones and played the Sketches of Spain show for him did he look back. He passed away weeks later. Jazz "purists" aren't glad Miles developed into a jazz-rock format to reach more people but I'm glad he did. He brought jazz into the modern times, kicking and screaming.

Some people like Humble Pie more when Frampton was in the band, I think frampton was much better as a solo act and Humble Pie was much better with one lead vocalist, Steve Marriott. Very happy I saw them at one of my first rock concerts as a kid of 12. I would find out shortly later what that strangely stinking smoke smell was during that hazy concert!
 
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CC Cirillo

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When I was a teen I used to listen to The Grateful Dead. Even went to see them at the Meadowlands in 1978. But as I continued studying the drums and gained a greater appreciation for listening to skilled musicians who have mastered their instruments, I was less and less able to listen to them. I no longer will listen to them, at least I won't be the one to choose them on an ipod, album, streaming or otherwise. I'll merely bear them if someone else decides to play the Dead.
My experience EXACTLY!
 

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