Bass Drum Mic -- again

MBB

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Hi All, is there any consensus as to the "best" (if there is such a thing) mic for a BD for live shows? I have been using an old Shure but was hoping to find another good sounding mic that is less bulky to mount onto my hoop with a goose neck holder. The Shure is way too heavy.
 

bpaluzzi

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There's not really a one-size-fits-all mic. The Audix D6 and the AKG D112 are kind of "set it and forget it" mics that give a very modern kick sound. If that's the sound that you're looking for, they're fantastic for that.

What kind of music? What size drums? Is the entire kit mic'ed, or just the kick drum?
 

MBB

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There's not really a one-size-fits-all mic. The Audix D6 and the AKG D112 are kind of "set it and forget it" mics that give a very modern kick sound. If that's the sound that you're looking for, they're fantastic for that.

What kind of music? What size drums? Is the entire kit mic'ed, or just the kick drum?
It's a 22x16 Lud Legacy maple with a ported reso head. Looking for vintage-y thump. Play pretty varied styles of music. Rock, blues, country, folk, Basic cover band stuff. I use sennheiser 604's on my snare/toms.
 

mgdrummer

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Most sound companies that I work with (well, during a NORMAL year...) seem to either be using Audix D6’s or Shure Beta 52’s. There’s an occasional EV mic (not familiar, don’t know the models) or the engineer who wants to use a Beta 91A inside and the 52 on the outside.

I personally have three kicks (16x22 maple, 18x22 maple/birch hybrid and 18x24 birch) set up with Beta 91A’s internally mounted with Kelly Shu “Flatz” mounts. Personally I prefer this mic for my in-ear monitors because it has plenty of definition to accurately hear the impact of my kick hits, and the low end is shaped in such a way that it’s not overly muddy/woofy in the ears.
 
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Beefsurgeon

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A gooseneck might be tricky for a bass drum mic--I'd be worried that the weight of the mic, the vibration of the drum, and gravity would cause it to gradually fall out of position. I'm guessing that you're trying to avoid the extra weight of carrying a mic stand to the gig? If so, maybe consider exploring some of the various shell-mounting options such as the Kelly Shu system.

That said, an AKG D112 weighs less than half as much as a Shure Beta52.
 

bpaluzzi

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It's a 22x16 Lud Legacy maple with a ported reso head. Looking for vintage-y thump. Play pretty varied styles of music. Rock, blues, country, folk, Basic cover band stuff. I use sennheiser 604's on my snare/toms.
For that sound, an ATM250 can be great.

Lots of good samples on here:

I'd echo the recommendation for the Kelly SHU. I have that on all of my kicks, with a combination of Beta52s, D6s, Avantone Mondos, and Beta91s installed.
 

hsosdrum

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Do not clip a bass drum mic to the drum itself. Vibrations will transmit through the mount to the mic, causing rumbling and all sorts of other headaches for whomever's running sound. Plus as mentioned before, the mic's position is likely to shift, or the mount might even fail outright.

I use two D112s mounted on small desk stands (non-ported reso heads) and the extra weight of the stands is next to nothing.
 

MBB

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Do not clip a bass drum mic to the drum itself. Vibrations will transmit through the mount to the mic, causing rumbling and all sorts of other headaches for whomever's running sound. Plus as mentioned before, the mic's position is likely to shift, or the mount might even fail outright.

I use two D112s mounted on small desk stands (non-ported reso heads) and the extra weight of the stands is next to nothing.
Good to know. thanks.
 

Tommy D

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Is a Shure Beta 91a ever used on its own? I always hear of people throwing on a second mic in conjunction with that one. If it can work by itself and provide a nice sound, just plop that down on a small pillow inside the bass drum and feed the wire through the port hole. No need for mic clips and vibrations, etc.
 

drumphils

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Heil PR48
Tune the bass to your ears, bring the volume up on the board, you’re done.
I’ve had people running a board waiting to do something to it, but just move on.

Phil
 

bpaluzzi

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Is a Shure Beta 91a ever used on its own? I always hear of people throwing on a second mic in conjunction with that one. If it can work by itself and provide a nice sound, just plop that down on a small pillow inside the bass drum and feed the wire through the port hole. No need for mic clips and vibrations, etc.
I use a 91 by itself quite a bit. Live, it’s definitely enough. In the studio, you can get a passable kick sound. It won’t be a monster, room-shaking low end, but honestly you don’t need that most of the time.
 

rculberson

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Loves me the 91a. Have never sought out monster low end. Always wanted a punchy pop sounding bass drum. This mic does that sound better than any other that I've tried.
 

Seb77

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For me the good ol Sennheiser 602 works best.

As natural as can be.
? The Senn602 and the Audix D6 to my ear are some of the most scooped sounding mics. There are a lot of shootouts on youtube by now, where you can compare.

If the bass drum is as nice as in your case, and you want an old-school thump anyway, I would go with a more neutral sounding mic.

I have tried a MD421, since it was used a lot before the advent of D112 and other dedicated bd mics - not that much low-end, and in fact slightly scooped sounding, and the high end is present but somewhat coloured to my ear.
A small mic with a somewhat similar sound but with extended low edn, is an ATM25, precursor of the 250 etc. It can catch a bright attack, mids are a bit subdued, but you can get different sounds (seems with a D6 et al. you always get the same sound).

The EV ND 868 was coined the "big thumper" in one test, and I agree it's a monster in the low-end. It lacks some snap in the highs though, and it is rather scooped. (For recording, I recently put it on the reso head with another mic inside)

Some neutral sounding classics would be the EV RE20 or Beyer M88. These can be used for instruments and vocals, too. The M88 is very honest, I used it for an open-sounding bop bass drum. For a modern pop/rock sound you need to work the eq quite a bit (I don't own an RE20, but they sound a bit similar in shootuts).
 

jtpaistegeist

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I like using the Audix D6 or EV RE20. Sometimes together. You get the modern and classis sounds.
 

musiqman

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? The Senn602 and the Audix D6 to my ear are some of the most scooped sounding mics. There are a lot of shootouts on youtube by now, where you can compare.

If the bass drum is as nice as in your case, and you want an old-school thump anyway, I would go with a more neutral sounding mic.

I have tried a MD421, since it was used a lot before the advent of D112 and other dedicated bd mics - not that much low-end, and in fact slightly scooped sounding, and the high end is present but somewhat coloured to my ear.
A small mic with a somewhat similar sound but with extended low edn, is an ATM25, precursor of the 250 etc. It can catch a bright attack, mids are a bit subdued, but you can get different sounds (seems with a D6 et al. you always get the same sound).

The EV ND 868 was coined the "big thumper" in one test, and I agree it's a monster in the low-end. It lacks some snap in the highs though, and it is rather scooped. (For recording, I recently put it on the reso head with another mic inside)

Some neutral sounding classics would be the EV RE20 or Beyer M88. These can be used for instruments and vocals, too. The M88 is very honest, I used it for an open-sounding bop bass drum. For a modern pop/rock sound you need to work the eq quite a bit (I don't own an RE20, but they sound a bit similar in shootuts).
I had the Beta 52, Opus 65, and D112, before and this was the most natural sound of them.

I use the 421’s on the racks and floors. It doesn’t work as good on the 18” so that one will get an 602 too in the near future.

I have a different kit/recording approach and room than most studio’s though, so that could be a big part of why these work the most natural in this setting.
 

John DeChristopher

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I use a Shure Beta 52 with the Kelly Shu in six of my vintage kits - all with 14x22 bass drums and non-ported front heads (4 x Gretsch, 1 x Rogers, 1 x Ludwig) and couldn't be happier. An EQ Pad lightly touching both batter and reso heads, so a slight amount of muffling, but a very natural and full sound even when not mic'd.
 

NobleCooleyNut

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Is a Shure Beta 91a ever used on its own? I always hear of people throwing on a second mic in conjunction with that one. If it can work by itself and provide a nice sound, just plop that down on a small pillow inside the bass drum and feed the wire through the port hole. No need for mic clips and vibrations, etc.
I used the Beta 91a on it’s own in a Whitney nesting kit - it worked great on its own . The Whitney kit had a groove cut out that would allow the cable to run into the bass drum . A brilliant idea .

I really like the Sennheiser E-902 bass drum mic . It is a well built mic that just dials in quick and sounds great . No miss no fuss .
The Shure Beta 52a is another mic. I really like as well - very warm and full sounding .
 
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