Bass pedal loosens/goes crooked during play

stevil

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OK, here's a question I'm ashamed to ask, but here goes: My pedals almost always seem prone to loosening while I play them, such that they end up crooked, ie not perpendicular to the bass drum. I don't have pics, but I can add them later if that's necessary. This seems to happen whether I attach them at exactly 6 o'clock or slightly to the left or right. It also happens whether the front of the drum is elevated or horizontal to the ground. I've played Tamas for years, but it used to happen when I played a Pearl, so it's probably operator error and not something specific to either brand.

Would appreciate any suggestions or insights.
 

cribbon

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When that happens to me, it's usually because the outer spur is not holding and the bass drum starts rotating counterclockwise. I always place a scrap of cloth between my pedal and the hoop and sometimes I haven't tightened it down enough to keep the pedal completely attached when the bass drum starts it spiral. When I get a minute between songs I just reach down and tighten as much as it will go and problem solved.
 

JDA

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does it have "one of those" Red slider plates underneath the pedal?
 
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kicksnarehat

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A bit of skateboard tape around the hoop works for me. Fold it over the hoop so it’s on both sides. You won’t need to over tighten the pedal clamp then.

For back lines and shared kits, a little Velcro on your pedal heal plate can stop horizontal swinging so long as the heal has a good purchase on a rug.
 

1988fxlr

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What kind of pedal and metal, wood, or synthetic hoop? Sounds like the pedal clamp isn’t closing fully on the hoop. If your pedal has another bolt on top of the clamp try tightening it.
FA3032C3-766D-4E1D-B953-B0E069599E4A.jpeg
 

stevil

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does it have "one of those" Red slider plates underneath the pedal?
It’s a Tama Dyna Sync. If I recall correctly, there some textured rubber strips. Are you thinking of the DW 5000 with smooth bottom?
 

stevil

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What kind of pedal and metal, wood, or synthetic hoop? Sounds like the pedal clamp isn’t closing fully on the hoop. If your pedal has another bolt on top of the clamp try tightening it. View attachment 550709
Fiberglass hoop. I also have a rubber hoop protector from TC/DC. I’m familiar with this adjustment, but I’ll make sure it’s nice and snug.
 

stevil

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A bit of skateboard tape around the hoop works for me. Fold it over the hoop so it’s on both sides. You won’t need to over tighten the pedal clamp then.

For back lines and shared kits, a little Velcro on your pedal heal plate can stop horizontal swinging so long as the heal has a good purchase on a rug.
I think the hoop protector from TC/DC does the same thing that tape would do, unless you’re talking about the highly textured, almost sandpaper-like adhesive stuff, in which case I’ve never tried that. Thanks
 

stevil

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When that happens to me, it's usually because the outer spur is not holding and the bass drum starts rotating counterclockwise. I always place a scrap of cloth between my pedal and the hoop and sometimes I haven't tightened it down enough to keep the pedal completely attached when the bass drum starts it spiral. When I get a minute between songs I just reach down and tighten as much as it will go and problem solved.
Hadn’t considered that it might be my bass drum that’s moving, but come to think of it, maybe I didn’t have this problem as often back when I played on a rug with a piece of 2x4 that anchored the drum in place… I don’t miss lugging that dirty carpet around to shows, but maybe that’s what it’ll take.
 

Tornado

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Hadn’t considered that it might be my bass drum that’s moving, but come to think of it, maybe I didn’t have this problem as often back when I played on a rug with a piece of 2x4 that anchored the drum in place… I don’t miss lugging that dirty carpet around to shows, but maybe that’s what it’ll take.

Hold up. Don't go back to your filthy carpet, and you don't need a 2x4. Get a 3x5 rubber backed commercial entry rug. It's the perfect size to place your bass drum and hi-hat stand on, and it won't budge. It doesn't need to be big enough for your throne to sit on, so don't worry about that. I used to have a carpet until I got mine, and it really made a difference in space utilization and load in/out. I can even roll it up and fit it into my rolling hardware case.
 

cribbon

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Hold up. Don't go back to your filthy carpet, and you don't need a 2x4. Get a 3x5 rubber backed commercial entry rug. It's the perfect size to place your bass drum and hi-hat stand on, and it won't budge. It doesn't need to be big enough for your throne to sit on, so don't worry about that. I used to have a carpet until I got mine, and it really made a difference in space utilization and load in/out. I can even roll it up and fit it into my rolling hardware case.
He's right, a rubber-backed entry rug is thin and does the job. Just remember: DO NOT CENTER THE BASS DRUM ON THE RUG; place it near the edge opposite your hi-hat if you play conventional right-handed. The snare drum is the center of your kit, not the bass drum.

2021-12-17-ALSevern002.JPG


2021-12-17-ALSevern004.JPG
 

louieoke

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A strip of leather from an old belt between the hoop and the top of the pedal clamp will secure quite well, and remove 1 variable for you. I also use an anti-fatigue mat to place my kit on, that seems to work great for me...
 

kicksnarehat

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I think the hoop protector from TC/DC does the same thing that tape would do, unless you’re talking about the highly textured, almost sandpaper-like adhesive stuff, in which case I’ve never tried that. Thanks
Yes, the sandpaper stuff:


My experience w/ the rubber/leather/etc protectors is that while they do protect the hoop, they don't stabilize the pedal and in some cases increase that problem.
 

Old crone

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OK, here's a question I'm ashamed to ask, but here goes: My pedals almost always seem prone to loosening while I play them, such that they end up crooked, ie not perpendicular to the bass drum. I don't have pics, but I can add them later if that's necessary. This seems to happen whether I attach them at exactly 6 o'clock or slightly to the left or right. It also happens whether the front of the drum is elevated or horizontal to the ground. I've played Tamas for years, but it used to happen when I played a Pearl, so it's probably operator error and not something specific to either brand.

Would appreciate any suggestions or insights.
Don't be ashamed, your question is just as valid as any of these technical questions that are all over this site. You have an issue you want it resolved, good for you!
 

kzac

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I think everyone here has had their bass drum creep to one side or the other, and therefore their pedal cock sideways. In the 60s, when most of the bass drum spurs were ... junk... it happened all the time. There is even a solo video of Joe Morello playing a solo where he has to jerk his bass drum back into place. Ludwig was plagued with bass drum creep in my younger days, They went so far as to make a device that clipped to your front bass drum rim, which had spikes protruding from it to slow down bass drum creep....

Setting your kit up on a bare floor, especially wood or concrete. will often allow your bass drum to creep across the floor, as your play.

There are many different approaches to stopping bass drum creep. I have found that a very good set of bass spurs, and placing your kit on a rug, is the best overall method. On all my current kits, the bass drum is Yamaha. I don't have creep issues with their bass drums.
 

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

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DO NOT CENTER THE BASS DRUM ON THE RUG; place it near the edge opposite your hi-hat if you play conventional right-handed. The snare drum is the center of your kit, not the bass drum.
^^^ THIS ^^^

You definitely want your Hat stand and BD pedal ON that rug. The floor and or right hand cymbal(s) stand(s) aren't as critical and less likely to move away as you play.

Also you could look into a BD pedal with screwable spikes (pretty much all DW's lineup has them and a lot of other manufacturers as well). Retractable spikes grip firmily into all carpets/rubbery surfaces.

Installing some heavy duty strips of rough self-adhesive velcro on the underside of your pedal frame/baseplate could help some as well. Skateboard grip tape could probably work, though probably not as effective as velcro.
 

frankmott

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Can you determine if it's the drum or the pedal? If it's the pedal, and the heel of the pedal is shifting to the right (assuming you play right-footed), you may not be aligning the drum and pedal with the angle of your right leg. Try setting up as if you had two bass drums, with the drum/pedal following the line of your thigh straight out from your hip. That way, all the force of your foot is straight into the drum.
 


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