bass wood drums

MrYikes

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I know that there are a lot of products that are made with basswood. I know that it is a light weight and soft wood similar to balsa wood but maybe more rigid. I believe the issue with basswood is that it will not hold hardware well. I have no real information about it.

Are there drums made with bass wood? What are their sound characteristics? Any other thoughts about them?
 

Elvis

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Basswood's been popular as an inexpensive option for drum builders for about 20 years now.
Check out any older mid-level or entry level kit and it shouldn't be too hard to find one made of basswood.
Sound quality? Probably similar to Poplar.
 

ARGuy

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I've got a bunch of Taye Tour Pro drums, which are basswood. There's no problem with the edges, and these drums are at least 15 years old. Compared to maple, they have a darker, punchier sound with less sustain, at least to my ears. I put some S Hoops on one of the sets, and got a Gretsch-like sound from them.
 

shuffle

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I know that there are a lot of products that are made with basswood. I know that it is a light weight and soft wood similar to balsa wood but maybe more rigid. I believe the issue with basswood is that it will not hold hardware well. I have no real information about it.

Are there drums made with bass wood? What are their sound characteristics? Any other thoughts about them?
I bought a Sound Percussion kit ,12,15,20 ,new at GC in 2007 for a jam session,Basswood,light weight,sounded good with Emps and SK1 on bass.
I heard them off stage and they were fine.
Only thing,they just didnt project well at all.
Further away from the stage, they got lost in the mix 25 ft away.
Being S.P.,the lugs,mounts,spurs were crap
 

Tornado

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I bought a Sound Percussion kit ,12,15,20 ,new at GC in 2007 for a jam session,Basswood,light weight,sounded good with Emps and SK1 on bass.
I heard them off stage and they were fine.
Only thing,they just didnt project well at all.
Further away from the stage, they got lost in the mix 25 ft away.
Being S.P.,the lugs,mounts,spurs were crap

That might not be a bad thing mic'd up in certain situations.
 

shuffle

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That might not be a bad thing mic'd up in certain situations.
Like AR said,they're punchy but dont project well.
Mic'd they were fine but old school jam so not micd for convenience sake.
Used them 5 yrs there
 

MrYikes

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I bought a Sound Percussion kit ,12,15,20 ,new at GC in 2007 for a jam session,Basswood,light weight,sounded good with Emps and SK1 on bass.
Being S.P.,the lugs,mounts,spurs were crap
I am looking for a light weight kit. Was the wood just basswood or was some other wood veneered onto it? Did you notice any of the lugs being pulled out or moving? After starting this thread, I googled and saw many brand names using this wood so my concerns are probably unwarranted.
 

RickPlaysDrums

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Tama manufactured bass wood sets in the early 2000s and maybe a couple years earlier. They were, of course, designated as something-Star. I believe Superstar. They were alright drums with good mounting hardware and appointments. They sounded okay for what you would expect of a six or seven-hundred dollar shell pack expenditure.

Resultant of modern manufacturing practices (shells in round and precise bearing edges) most modern drums sound half-way-decent. What separates entry-level, mid-to professional-level kits is the addition, or lack thereof, of quality tone woods.
 
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tillerva

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Definitely much denser than balsa. Balsa would not work out.
Similar to poplar, found in the core of many drums.
I don't think I'd worry about the hardware.
 

shuffle

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I am looking for a light weight kit. Was the wood just basswood or was some other wood veneered onto it? Did you notice any of the lugs being pulled out or moving? After starting this thread, I googled and saw many brand names using this wood so my concerns are probably unwarranted.
Just saw this.
Never had any lugs,spurs or mount pull thru the holes drilled.
I always wanted to finish the interiors with tongue oil for some projection but never did.
 

Mcjnic

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I’ve owned quite a few basswood drums. They have no similarities to Poplar that I could discern. Basswood has a nice warm punch and does play quieter than Maple or Birch or Poplar. It’s quite nice. It does not have a long sustain, but it does linger just enough for a pleasant tone under a mic. Excellent studio kits.
As to the strength ... all of my kits were the twin toms on a bass setup. They were light and very strong shells. No idea where anyone would perceive basswood drum shells to be anything but strong.
Several manufactures have put out basswood kits.
Some of my favorite studio kits were solely basswood plys.
 
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MrYikes

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Thank you for your responses. My only experience was with an electric violin I bought made with basswood. The neck pulled down from the string pressure and it was difficult to repair. Because so many drum companies have used this wood and there are many years of use, we can be certain that basswood used for drum shells is an appropriate choice.
 
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Tornado

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Thank you for your responses. My only experience was with an electric violin I bought made with basswood. The neck pulled down from the string pressure and it was difficult to repair. Because so many drum companies have used this wood and there is many years of use, we can be certain that basswood used for drum shells is an appropriate choice.
I'm not sure about the construction of the violin, but turning softer woods into plywood tends to greatly increase their strength and durability.
 

Barden

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I know that there are a lot of products that are made with basswood. I know that it is a light weight and soft wood similar to balsa wood but maybe more rigid. I believe the issue with basswood is that it will not hold hardware well. I have no real information about it.

Are there drums made with bass wood? What are their sound characteristics? Any other thoughts about them?
mapex m-series from ~2000 was a maple outer ply around a basswood shell.
 

Wheresmyroadie?

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Tama manufactured bass wood sets in the early 2000s and maybe a couple years earlier. They were, of course, designated as something-Star. I believe Superstar. They were alright drums with good mounting hardware and appointments. They sounded okay for what you would expect of a six or seven-hundred dollar shell pack expenditure.

Resultant of modern manufacturing practices (shells in round and precise bearing edges) most modern drums sound half-way-decent. What separates entry-level, mid-to professional-level kits is the addition, or lack thereof, of quality tone woods.
 

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