Bearing edge cutting

Joe61

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Hi everyone, I am trying to find a repair shop that can re cut the bearing edges on a 15" tom. I live in the southeastern Mi. area. Several searches on the web came up with shops outside my area. Hoping that a forum member in my area may know of a shop.

Thanks
Joe
 

TRJR

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JimTPD

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i have seen many posts arguing against re-cutting bearing edges on older drums.

In 1973, bought and and still own a used set of Rogers 1969 (+/- ?) Swivos in red onyx. (Nearly immaculate)

I .... COLD.... NEVER....N..E...V...E...R...... TUNE THE 12x8 or the 13x9 toms.
If I tuned them high they were strong, loud, projecting rockers. But other than tuned high, they were an embarasment.
And I could never figure out what I was doing wrong.
And then one night I played a set of Yamaha Oak Customs and the toms were butter.
And I started hating my rogers Drum Set.
So I decided to figure the problem out...
you tube...you tube ... you tube... flat table... rock rock rock.... you know the story.

I inspected my bearing edges and I found that the FACTORY BEARING EDGES had been cut HORRIBLY ! THEY WERE NEITHER ROUND NOR LEVEL.

Although the SHELLS are round, the 45 bearing cut wobbled "deeper and shallower" in and out of the Re-Ring. So the apex of the bearing edge wandered " in and out" relative to the "theoretical center" of the drum. So the bearing edge wasn't round from center. And the "Top of the bearing" rose and fell +/- more than 1/16th of and inch.

Because I had owned these drums for over 40 years, I didn't realize how faulty the bearings were until AFTER I re-cut them.

After cutting new bearings and then hearing the correction , I can describe the OBVIOUS fault;

Even with brand new heads and rims ( I couldnt figure out the problem so I initially replaced the rims too) after seating and " adding low tension to the new head", there CLEARLY were areas around the head that were speaking, but there were also areas ( a few inches along the edge of the drum in multiple spots) that continued to sound flabby, paper like, and dead. And for 40+ years, I would just tighten the head "evenly" until the dead spots started to produce tone.... and THAT became my starting point.
And all of the you tube "Tune your drum" videos just frustrated the HELL out of me because "It was so easy".... "For them"... and my drums just would not do it... if my heads weren't TIGHT the drums would not sing..

So, even though I knew that I was violating the "Original" drum.... I new that I...HATED....MY....ROGERS...TOM TOMS.

So, after disassembling the toms, I started cutting the 45 degree cuts ...VERY SHALLOW... / taking off just slivers of the 45 bearing edges. ( do a you tube search for videos on "cutting bearing edges on a router table" and other videos on guys sanding the shell ends on a sanding table ( For flatness/true-ness).

1) First I covered the bearing edge target area with yellow chalk... MARKING THE WHOLE TARGET AREA... so that when I started cutting, I would be able to see, what was being cut ( no more chalk) vs... "low spots/divets" which my shallow cutting had not yet reached (Chalk remaining)... AND IMMEDIATELY the horrible original bearing cut became obvious... chalk, no chalk, chalk, no chalk.

2) Then, as I saw that what I was doing made sense, I switched from chalk to heavy carpenter's pencil so that I could see and follow the the changes more easily.

3) Yes I first made shallow passes to the 45 cut FIRST.... yes there was a "potential" rocking/wobble to my shell which could have caused deeper cutting if the shell rocked in a manner that would drive shell down onto the router cutting blade. But the cutting depth was intentionally adjusted to a very shallow cut and I made damn sure to apply downward pressure evenly on the sell so that it was always stable on the cutting table. (no rocking)

4) THEN, after a few passes around the shell to cut the 45.... THEN.... I tuned the drum / hand sanded the bearing edge on a big flat table with 60 grit sand paper... (refer to you tube video)

5) The reason I did the FIRST cuts in that order was, by cutting the first few beginning 45 taper passes FIRST, I had less shell/wood to level on the flat sanding table, as I was only sanding/leveling the apex area.

6) I continued to a) mark with pencil ( completely cover the target area so that I could see what was getting cut and what was still NOT getting cut due to low spots) b) cut another SHALLOW 45 pass, noting cut vs not yet cut areas.
then c) back to the flat sanding table to continue truing the FLATNESS of the bearing edge

7) I repeated #6 above many times.... I expect that a more experienced drum shop could have completed the process much more quickly as, I continued to take TINY shavings of bearing edge. And little by little, the pencil marking started to shave away evenly.

8) One more pass on the sanding table, then the bearing cut ( Another SLIVER) for evenness, and then and very light FINAL pass on the sanding table, again for evenness/ (super flat even true bearing edge).

9) Then I hand sanded around the OUTSIDE to add a little relief for the round-over portion of the head.

10) THEN I lightly sanded the bearing apex to add a very subtle round-over to the top.

11) Ultimately, with the router table I did cut a very shallow outside 45 edge, but because of the "HUMP" (due to my onyx wrap overlapping), I was unable to make a perfect machine 45 bearing cut on the out side. So I shallow cut what I could and then hand sanded the outside for relief and smoothness.

I apologize for the long description.
And I much as I didnt want to ruin the "ORIGINAL" value of the drums.... THE REPAIR WAS ABSOLUTELY WORTH IT.

Rogers or not, they sounded HORRIBLE and were .... UN...Tune...able. Original? sure.... playable... no... they were junk.
The only diff between correcting the bad bearing cuts immediatelly after they were down wrong in in the first place (in 1970 ) and me cutting them in 2017, ... is a few years. And now the bearings are now correct. But they are just missing the grey speckled paint.

After the new bearings the drums were IMMEDIATELY tune-able and now sing.

The 12x 8 and the 13x 9 were terrible and I elected to cut both ends of both drums.
I wasn't sure if I should also re-cut my 16x16 floor tom... but I did and I WAS SHOCKED ! I turned it into a CANNON !

I would do it again in a heart beat. loss of value is moot because these are MY drums....
Are they Yamaha Oaks or Phoenix?..... who cares. They sing and I love them.







Additionally I was a piano tuner so I have wood tools, routers, some wood chops... and no brains.

So reluctan
 

Joe61

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Sorry but didn’t see posting until today. In southeast Michigan there’s Winston who owns Drum kitchen. Does superb work and great person to deal with. Has built three snares for me and would say he’s almost anal about his work. Pretty flawless.
Great thanks. Do you know if Winston is still offering this service? I searched Drum Kitchen with no luck. Is there a way to reach him?

Thanks
Joe
 

TRJR

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Great thanks. Do you know if Winston is still offering this service? I searched Drum Kitchen with no luck. Is there a way to reach him?

Thanks
Joe
For someone who’s meticulous about bearing edges in Southeast Michigan. Contact Craig Winston of MDK @ (561) 400-2350. Good guy who knows what he’s doing.
 

Joe61

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For someone who’s meticulous about bearing edges in Southeast Michigan. Contact Craig Winston of MDK @ (561) 400-2350. Good guy who knows what he’s doing.
Thanks for the contact information.
Joe
 

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