Beautiful guitar chords?

Piggpenn

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I ended up taking over guitar duties when the pastor's son got old enough to play the drums and wanted to be the drummer.

I knew very little going in but man did I get a great education.

Take ANY contemporary Christian song and analyze the guitar chords. They are all 7ths and variants of Major and Minor chords and they all are simply beautiful to the ears. Was enjoyable to play those beautiful chords and also grow my musical knowledge and abilities.
 

Piggpenn

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I believe that the ability to play the guitar is good for your health, and also develops your hand motor skills well.
I believe that to be true as well.

Also see this is your first post. Welcome to DFO.
 

Singinly

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I think that music is an integral part of our life. I really like Lana Del Rey, for her sensual songs.
 

Rock Salad

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Beautiful chords explained (somewhat)
She has more basic ones too.
 
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Pat A Flafla

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Depends 100% on the context of the music. Show up to a blues jam with a guitar, end a tune on a maj. 7, and be ready to duck.
 

Rock Salad

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That's for sure. But put that same maj7 chord a half step down against the rest of the group and you just put a hard rock edge on your blues ending. Gives a b5, 7 and #9 (don't use the root)
 

Pat A Flafla

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If we're just picking a chord without context, for some goofy reason, I guess I like (0,2,6,8), also known by Forte Number 4-25, and appearing in tonal contexts as the Fr+6, regardless of transposition or inversion. In fact, I suppose I do like it best when used for color, rather than function.
 
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Rock Salad

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I like and use those intervals (I think.) I hadn't really considered using them with the root "0" (?), and 8 where you have them though. I will try that. Usually I use them as 5 7 R(1), or 3 5 6. It is a lovely chime sound for sure, beautiful chord.
 

Pat A Flafla

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I like and use those intervals (I think.) I hadn't really considered using them with the root "0" (?), and 8 where you have them though. I will try that. Usually I use them as 5 7 R(1), or 3 5 6. It is a lovely chime sound for sure, beautiful chord.
If you're referring to mine, those are half steps--not scale degrees.
It's a way of describing chords by construction only, with no reference to context or function.
Mine could be c d f# g#, or (as it might have appeared in the 1800s in a c major or minor tune) Ab C D F#, or any other voicing. It also covers transpositions, like G A C# D#.
(0,4,7) would describe any major triad (Forte # 3-11b).
 
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Rock Salad

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Neat!
I don't have a keyboard, so that chord is near impossible for me. It's like a whole tone type harmony? How would you use it?
 

Pat A Flafla

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Neat!
I don't have a keyboard, so that chord is near impossible for me. It's like a whole tone type harmony? How would you use it?
It can be whole tone based, but classical composers used it as a colorful dominant preparation, enhancing the weight of the V chord near structurally significant points. It's more dramatic than a IV or ii chord.
Note: it doesn't work well in this particular context on guitar because it needs to be voiced precisely, with the lowered 6th scale degree in the bass, and the raised 4th scale degree further above it, and those voices both need to resolve by half step, outward away from each other, to scale degree five. Now you can always do what you want with any chord, but "French Augmented 6th" describes a very specific chord that historically behaved a very specific way. (0,2,6,8) is just a cool sounding simultaneity of pitches.
 
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Pat A Flafla

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That totally helps. Neat-o, something new to try out
Well, I plunked an example out real quick from the C minor Chopin prelude, but apparently I can't attach the vid directly to a message, so since I'm not willing to create social media accounts to link from I guess it was a waste of time. FWIW, it's in measure 6, on beat 2.
 

Rock Salad

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Pat-a, I am getting it- I feel. I also enjoy camping out on a sub-dominant. It's a thing. In many contexts.


Ok guys,
TAB coming soon! Even if it gets pretty tangential, remember we are musicians- probably done these things before, maybe on another instrument. Pat-a 's notation is super scientific, but a real way to notate things without much context. It's hard to read but very precise, wish we could easily type standard bar notation huh? And the chord, question? please? Is it kind of a way to make a sub dominant be lydian? In a minor center? Because that sounds :cool:
 

Pat A Flafla

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Pat-a, I am getting it- I feel. I also enjoy camping out on a sub-dominant. It's a thing. In many contexts.


Ok guys,
TAB coming soon! Even if it gets pretty tangential, remember we are musicians- probably done these things before, maybe on another instrument. Pat-a 's notation is super scientific, but a real way to notate things without much context. It's hard to read but very precise, wish we could easily type standard bar notation huh? And the chord, question? please? Is it kind of a way to make a sub dominant be lydian? In a minor center? Because that sounds :cool:
Remember that in classical music the musical lines and voice leading came first, and the vertical harmonies came second. When they had raised 4th scale degrees, it was because they were trying to lead a line more strongly to a cadence on the 5. From a solfege standpoint, "Fi" happens all the time in major and minor classical music. "Le" happens frequently too, as a way of making a line pull downward to the 5 more strongle. That's what these augmented sixth chords are: "Fi" and "Le" at the same time, doubly enhancing voice leading tension to the 5.

It's my opinion that our ears got rewired for chords-first hearing when guitar took over as the primary instrument in western public consciousness. Sure, there are several ways to play a G major chord, but not enough to preserve four simultaneous moving lines with rock solid voice leading. Guitar is great at soaring melidies, and chunky chords. That's why so many bass lines now are root root root root root root root. We're now wired to hear harmonic verticality before horizontal harmonic lines. Because guitar (IMO).
 

Rock Salad

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I don't know about all that horizontal/vertical. I am going to try your chord tomorrow when I'm off work. See if I can sound classical lol
 

Rock Salad

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I had my doubts about Pat-a's chord as a beautiful stan-alone chord on guitar, but it qualifies! I sure don't know how to use it properly but here a TAB

0
7
X
0
X
8
 


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