Beech VS. Mahogany

psmp50

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Hey everyone!
I’ve been lurking around here for a few months, so I finally decided to make a post.

I’m very close to moving on a vintage kit, but to be honest, I’m torn between a few things, and really can’t make up my mind.

I’m torn between a Sonor Teardrop from the 60’s - a three ply beech shell and a Slingerland/Ludwig mahogany shell. I’m hoping for a 20-12-14 setup (which I know I won’t really find in the Sonor - I’m ok with 20-13-16 as a secondary option)

so - I guess my questions are:
-what tonal characteristics can I expect as opposites in beech and mahogany?
-with slingerland/Ludwig, which models/years should I shoot for with mahogany?
-I’ve read the quality control at Ludwig and slingerland was hit or miss, but Sonors were always top notch. This true?

I play mainly blues, jazz, and some funk, but sometimes I’m in smaller venues without mics, so a great natural sound would be awesome!
I currently own a C&C player date 2 in 24-13-16 and a Tama starclassic maple in 22-10-12-14, so this would be meant to compliment, but be different.
Anyway - thanks! Looking forward to being a part of this great forum!
 

A.TomicMorganic

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I have now a 6 ply beech teardrop kit which sounds absolutely great and has exceptional build quality. I have owned older Americam mahoganies. To me both sound good, but the Sonor beech has the edge. Some of the best drums I have laid a stick to. I have no experience with the 3 plys though.
 

wayne

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Look into vintage Olympic kits. They are outstanding as well, but less expensive than Premier. Same shells, different hardware. Incredible drums!...I also have 50,s drops and they're #1 for sure
 

cdrummer

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I have now a 6 ply beech teardrop kit which sounds absolutely great and has exceptional build quality. I have owned older Americam mahoganies. To me both sound good, but the Sonor beech has the edge. Some of the best drums I have laid a stick to. I have no experience with the 3 plys though.
Having owned the 6-ply and 3-ply vintage teardrop kits and several vintage Ludwig kits, I would echo this and say that the teardrops are some of the best (if not the best) drums ever made. There's just something about the sound that no other drums seem to capture and they are so easy to tune and get sounding amazing. Also, my personal experience has been that vintage Ludwig kits will often have edge issues/out of round shells whereas the Sonor shells look brand new after 60 years.

Between the 3-ply and 6-ply, the 6-ply is more versatile and louder, which sounds like may be better for your situation, and the 3-ply is the best jazz sound you can imagine - warm, woody, and super resonant.

However, your are right about the sizes, it would be great if they had made these in 12-14-20 instead of 13-16-20. Have you thought about one of the new Sonor vintage kits? I don't have experience with them, but that may be a way to get the same shells with updated hardware and a choice of sizes.
 

psmp50

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I considered the new vintage series, but it’s definitely outside of my price range unfortunately.

Ive checked the for sale forum and don’t see one (Sonor teardrop) - but if anyone has one they are up for selling for a steal (even a players kit!) let me know!!

:)

Having owned the 6-ply and 3-ply vintage teardrop kits and several vintage Ludwig kits, I would echo this and say that the teardrops are some of the best (if not the best) drums ever made. There's just something about the sound that no other drums seem to capture and they are so easy to tune and get sounding amazing. Also, my personal experience has been that vintage Ludwig kits will often have edge issues/out of round shells whereas the Sonor shells look brand new after 60 years.

Between the 3-ply and 6-ply, the 6-ply is more versatile and louder, which sounds like may be better for your situation, and the 3-ply is the best jazz sound you can imagine - warm, woody, and super resonant.

However, your are right about the sizes, it would be great if they had made these in 12-14-20 instead of 13-16-20. Have you thought about one of the new Sonor vintage kits? I don't have experience with them, but that may be a way to get the same shells with updated hardware and a choice of sizes.
 

wayne

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I know of a 3 pc vintage 60,s kit going for a great price from Texas if you're interested
 

psmp50

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if it’s the Krystal Schwartz kit that’s up on reverb, I’ve definitely been watching that fir a while! Just need a few more bucks...

unless the one you know is different!

I know of a 3 pc vintage 60,s kit going for a great price from Texas if you're interested
 

Seb77

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I’m torn between a Sonor Teardrop from the 60’s - a three ply beech shell and a Slingerland/Ludwig mahogany shell.
Note that the Sonor 3ply shell is really thin (except for the rerings), whereas Slingerland/Ludwig used a thick core ply of poplar, so they differ in more than wood species.
I played a 20" Sonor 3ply for a while, sounded very warm but a bit too airy/thin, with not enough punch for my taste. The 3ply shells are unique, maybe the design stems from marching bass drums, very lightweight. The 6ply shells are a more versatile sound imo, 6mm I think, so in a way comparable to Gretsch and later Yamaha shell design, just in beech.
 

wayne

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All true, but you should grab that Texas kit, its a steal at that price. I,d grab it but i have to pay big just getting it across the border..FRUSTRATING!!
 

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