Before there was Bonham.. Before there was Ringo. This was the drummer that many drummers loved.

bernard

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In this video he speaks about how Jon Bonham
drove himself crazy trying to figure out one of his songs...



Fun video, thanks for sharing that (love the other drummer, just filling in for Sandy's left leg). I hope I will still think it is that fun to play the drums (and be goo enough to be allowed to do it) at his age!
 

orvilleb

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Sandy was one of my earliest drumming influences back in the ‘60s. Didn’t realize that he lost his right foot and part of the leg in a motorcycle accident in ‘63. Incredible how he continued to play through it. I guess that resolved the question of playing heel up or down on the bass drum.
 

rhythmace

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I have to tell this story again. In '65 I got to do a drum solo (part of a stage band assembly) in front of the whole high school. I started playing a solo and the stage band walked away. (We had seen Sonny Payne do it with Basie the year before and I copied all I could.) At one point I went into the "Teen Beat" thing rather softly. I heard a couple of scoffs from the student body. Then I suddenly added very loud off beat rim shots (playing a Super Sensitive) and it added a modern rock aspect suddenly. It got a big round of applause. Then I added some double bass drum ( on one bass drum) punches, which was a new thing at the time. (I used the bass drum with the right hand) Big response again. When the other members came back we ended with a stage band version of "Wipe Out" of course. Our traditional stage band then started doing rock songs at basketball games and other concerts. The drum solo was always requested and, of course, I was famous doing the right thing at the right time and got all the girls. I had to get over shyness about playing that "junk" drumming that I had done for the fun of it in my basement. Hey, Jake Hanna, Buddy or Joe would never play that stuff. Laugh! I still have 2 Sandy Nelson albums. Ace
P.S. I still have that red blazer. It shrunk like crazy though just sitting in the closet 54 years. Stageband Assembly 1.jpeg
 
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rondrums51

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When I was a young kid, I had all the Sandy Nelson 45's. He was usually playing on the toms, but when he played on the snare, the sound was amazing. That was back in the days when drums were recorded live without any engineering bull crap. That snare drum rang like a bell. I couldn't get that sound out of my wood student snare drum. I discovered that sound on the orchestra snare drum in my school band room. Ludwig COB, early 60's.

Why are drums recorded today with so much muffling and engineering? It's boring.
 

Mongrel

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Why are drums recorded today with so much muffling and engineering? It's boring.
Fear and control. Most of the "modern" era commercial music scene has become totally formulaic. So you need to fit the "formula".

Resulting in:

Fear of something different that may not be commercially viable, and therefore unable to pay the record company tab.

Control over the entire recording process so they can avoid #1, fear.
 
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Elvis

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Why are drums recorded today with so much muffling and engineering? It's boring.
Isolation and cleanliness (blame The Beatles, I do).
Producers and engineers would rather add in the effect, than have it produced naturally.
I remember always asking on the recording sessions I would do, if the band could play "live" for just one song (just one! that's all I'm asking for!).
Man the looks one gets. It's like I spiked their Tab with Draino or something.
Last recording session I was on, I finally got my wish. Worked pretty good. I think we only had to do two takes.

...also, not to dump all over everyone's parade, but wasn't this whole "Teen Beat" / "Tequilla" thing with the hooky rhythm just a reaction to Cozy Cole's Topsy Part II ?



Elvis
 
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GeneZ

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When I was a young kid, I had all the Sandy Nelson 45's. He was usually playing on the toms, but when he played on the snare, the sound was amazing. That was back in the days when drums were recorded live without any engineering bull crap. That snare drum rang like a bell. I couldn't get that sound out of my wood student snare drum. I discovered that sound on the orchestra snare drum in my school band room. Ludwig COB, early 60's.

Why are drums recorded today with so much muffling and engineering? It's boring.
In an old interview in Modern Drummer ( have laying it around somewhere) Sandy explained that he hated muffling and played wide open except for an effect had flip on muffling with taped pieces of towel strips.. And, without realizing it, revealed his secret formula for the snare sound. First, he said he liked his snare top head a bit tight, but not choked. Then... the secret for "that sound"... ProMark Japanese Oak sticks.

I went right out and bought a pair of 727's. I found that you can tune higher and get lower tones than normally for such tuning. I loved it! It was a eureka moment for me! I believe it was a large part of what gave Sandy that "Nelson wallop" many of us marveled at.
 
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